Women of Color #12 - Page 9 - Mothering Forums

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#241 of 2776 Old 08-02-2008, 08:28 PM
 
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I am back from vacation and exhausted. It is great to see this tribe active again. I'll be back when I am of sound mind to post more.
Peace.

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#242 of 2776 Old 08-02-2008, 09:22 PM
 
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YAY!, great to see this tribe active again! Im still here, lurking and all (but i think i'll post once i catch up), lol.

NMY actively making my dreams happen :
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#243 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 01:43 AM
 
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well, i really *really* have enjoyed catching up, and would like to say a welcome to all the new members and a hello to all the vets from a sporadic lurker!

so many things are interesting about what's been being said recently. (grammar police?) ...

the 'elite' thing - innnteresting. even though i hadnt known the class/demographics of the MDC board in particular, it is easy to understand how a board dedicated to self-educating about alternative childrearing practices would be a group full of people with a little more access to information, a little more health care choice, a little more free time than perhaps is normal in our society.

i was raised semi-granola (panafrican parents, natural hair, food co-op/health food store, semi-veg, home made clothes & toys, no/limited TV, emphasis on education, etc) in the 1980s and my parents had hardly any money. so, although i have always felt outside of the mainstream of african-american culture, i never thought of myself as 'elite' - just 'odd.'

that being said, i do consider myself an elite in that i am a member of a small sub-group: i'm a proud 'black nerd' (DH and i used to screenprint t-shirts that said 'BLACK NERDS UNITE' ) i consider myself VERY lucky to have many (like, half a dozen, LOL) really close, similarly cynical, outside-the-mainstream, nerdy black friends. to me who grew up a loner, this seems like a veritable BLOCK PARTY. in addition, my circle is full of smart and sexy black men who love and support (and marry!) their partners, support their families, homeschool and/or have a huge part in the daily rearing of their children, etc.

i am also firmly aware that elitism in the black community often means other things; although both of my parents are black, my family is cross-cultural in many ways. my mom's family is east coast traditional/historical black elite: the whole light skin, straight hair, professional/middle class, martha's vineyard, jack & jill type situation. my father's family is east coast classic: mid century migration from the rural south, blue collar roots. my siblings and i are among the lightest cousins on my father's side of the family, and the darkest cousins on my mother's side. quite grounding, IMHO.



the hair thing - that hair typing thing is a mess but it does come in handy for descriptive purposes. politically, i do believe that when black women - or women of any race with curly/kinky hair - straighten our hair, we are helping do our tiny part to perpetuate a eurocentric patriarchal beauty standard; and are participating in the devaluation of our racial type by treating our natural characteristics as some sort of 'problem' in need of fixing.

personally, i have relaxed my hair for maybe 6 years out of my life, mainly during high school, and during that time i was magically transformed from 'that nappyheaded girl' to 'that lightskinned girl.' so i've seen the hair thing from both sides; choosing to straighten after being natural, and choosing to be natural after straightening. for the past 14 years that i've worn a fro, locks, and a fro again, it's become less and less dramatic a situation for me in my daily life. i don't rant or prostheletize about it, or look down on individual women who choose to straighten, and i do look forward to a time when it is 'just hair' and is not loaded with as much political/cultural significance. i understand that for some individuals that day may have already come, and in many ways it has arrived for me as well. but i don't think it's arrived in general in the larger community; i think hair is still a huge significator in african-american culture and we can't ignore the fact that it conveys meaning - even if it's not the meaning we may have intended or the one that resonates with us inside.


(example) michelle obama, our next first lady, wears her hair in a demure, conservative, relaxed/straightened style not at all unlike that worn by condoleeza rice. when the new yorker did their [awkward/unfunny, imho - and does anyone want to talk about that?] 'satire' cover of the obamas the other week, what was the main change they made to their depiction of michelle? they gave her a huge, fluffy, kinky 'fro.' this is a hair style that i happily, sexily, lightheartedly rock on many occasions and guess what? i'm not a gun-toting militant radical who burns the american flag. but together with the other imagery that they selected for that cover, they selected kinky hair BECAUSE of the meaning it conveys. not because it is 'just hair.'

yknow?



on fubu and 'urban' fashion - meh. i am ITA with the PP who said she doesn't pay money for the right to advertise for others. i have never been into labels and i don't think a name brand is a valid substitution for style or quality.


why am i rambling so long? oh i dunno. it's late. hee hee!
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#244 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 07:37 AM
 
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[QUOTE=oyinmama;11848695]

Quote:
the 'elite' thing - innnteresting. even though i hadnt known the class/demographics of the MDC board in particular, it is easy to understand how a board dedicated to self-educating about alternative childrearing practices would be a group full of people with a little more access to information, a little more health care choice, a little more free time than perhaps is normal in our society.
ITA with this. I tend to think that this board (and not just the WOC board but MDC as a whole) is populated with women who are mostly highly educated and probably mid to higher income. I often marvel at the fact that some mamas on this board have posts in the 10s of thousands!


Quote:
that being said, i do consider myself an elite in that i am a member of a small sub-group: i'm a proud 'black nerd' (DH and i used to screenprint t-shirts that said 'BLACK NERDS UNITE' ) i consider myself VERY lucky to have many (like, half a dozen, LOL) really close, similarly cynical, outside-the-mainstream, nerdy black friends
. .

In HS, my friends and I were outside the box and yes, we were nerds (although I don't think we would have admitted it back then). Going to a math and science high school and liking things like Star Trek helped.





Quote:
the hair thing - that hair typing thing is a mess but it does come in handy for descriptive purposes. politically, i do believe that when black women - or women of any race with curly/kinky hair - straighten our hair, we are helping do our tiny part to perpetuate a eurocentric patriarchal beauty standard; and are participating in the devaluation of our racial type by treating our natural characteristics as some sort of 'problem' in need of fixing.
What you said.

Quote:
i don't rant or prostheletize about it, or look down on individual women who choose to straighten, and i do look forward to a time when it is 'just hair' and is not loaded with as much political/cultural significance. i understand that for some individuals that day may have already come, and in many ways it has arrived for me as well. but i don't think it's arrived in general in the larger community; i think hair is still a huge significator in african-american culture and we can't ignore the fact that it conveys meaning - even if it's not the meaning we may have intended or the one that resonates with us inside.
I think it's unfortunate. It will be a long time before our hair is not an issue or a political discussion every time we bring it up.


Quote:
(example) michelle obama, our next first lady, wears her hair in a demure, conservative, relaxed/straightened style not at all unlike that worn by condoleeza rice. when the new yorker did their [awkward/unfunny, imho - and does anyone want to talk about that?] 'satire' cover of the obamas the other week, what was the main change they made to their depiction of michelle? they gave her a huge, fluffy, kinky 'fro.' this is a hair style that i happily, sexily, lightheartedly rock on many occasions and guess what? i'm not a gun-toting militant radical who burns the american flag. but together with the other imagery that they selected for that cover, they selected kinky hair BECAUSE of the meaning it conveys. not because it is 'just hair.'

yknow?
If Michelle Obama was rockin' a natural, I doubt Barack Obama would be where he is now. Her hair (to a lot of folks- not saying it's right or wrong) is reminiscent of Jackie Onassis. I mean, not only is Michelle Obama good looking, poised and smart (all scary traits for a black woman to have to some people!), but she's got a Jackie O thing going for her. Obama has a Kennedy aura too. A natural would scare the pants off of folks. Straight is mainstream...and acceptable.

Sheila, mother to William and Min Hee, wife of David
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#245 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 10:31 AM
 
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well, i really *really* have enjoyed catching up, and would like to say a welcome to all the new members and a hello to all the vets from a sporadic lurker!

so many things are interesting about what's been being said recently. (grammar police?) ...

the 'elite' thing - innnteresting. even though i hadnt known the class/demographics of the MDC board in particular, it is easy to understand how a board dedicated to self-educating about alternative childrearing practices would be a group full of people with a little more access to information, a little more health care choice, a little more free time than perhaps is normal in our society.

i was raised semi-granola (panafrican parents, natural hair, food co-op/health food store, semi-veg, home made clothes & toys, no/limited TV, emphasis on education, etc) in the 1980s and my parents had hardly any money. so, although i have always felt outside of the mainstream of african-american culture, i never thought of myself as 'elite' - just 'odd.'

that being said, i do consider myself an elite in that i am a member of a small sub-group: i'm a proud 'black nerd' (DH and i used to screenprint t-shirts that said 'BLACK NERDS UNITE' ) i consider myself VERY lucky to have many (like, half a dozen, LOL) really close, similarly cynical, outside-the-mainstream, nerdy black friends. to me who grew up a loner, this seems like a veritable BLOCK PARTY. in addition, my circle is full of smart and sexy black men who love and support (and marry!) their partners, support their families, homeschool and/or have a huge part in the daily rearing of their children, etc.

i am also firmly aware that elitism in the black community often means other things; although both of my parents are black, my family is cross-cultural in many ways. my mom's family is east coast traditional/historical black elite: the whole light skin, straight hair, professional/middle class, martha's vineyard, jack & jill type situation. my father's family is east coast classic: mid century migration from the rural south, blue collar roots. my siblings and i are among the lightest cousins on my father's side of the family, and the darkest cousins on my mother's side. quite grounding, IMHO.



the hair thing - that hair typing thing is a mess but it does come in handy for descriptive purposes. politically, i do believe that when black women - or women of any race with curly/kinky hair - straighten our hair, we are helping do our tiny part to perpetuate a eurocentric patriarchal beauty standard; and are participating in the devaluation of our racial type by treating our natural characteristics as some sort of 'problem' in need of fixing.

personally, i have relaxed my hair for maybe 6 years out of my life, mainly during high school, and during that time i was magically transformed from 'that nappyheaded girl' to 'that lightskinned girl.' so i've seen the hair thing from both sides; choosing to straighten after being natural, and choosing to be natural after straightening. for the past 14 years that i've worn a fro, locks, and a fro again, it's become less and less dramatic a situation for me in my daily life. i don't rant or prostheletize about it, or look down on individual women who choose to straighten, and i do look forward to a time when it is 'just hair' and is not loaded with as much political/cultural significance. i understand that for some individuals that day may have already come, and in many ways it has arrived for me as well. but i don't think it's arrived in general in the larger community; i think hair is still a huge significator in african-american culture and we can't ignore the fact that it conveys meaning - even if it's not the meaning we may have intended or the one that resonates with us inside.


(example) michelle obama, our next first lady, wears her hair in a demure, conservative, relaxed/straightened style not at all unlike that worn by condoleeza rice. when the new yorker did their [awkward/unfunny, imho - and does anyone want to talk about that?] 'satire' cover of the obamas the other week, what was the main change they made to their depiction of michelle? they gave her a huge, fluffy, kinky 'fro.' this is a hair style that i happily, sexily, lightheartedly rock on many occasions and guess what? i'm not a gun-toting militant radical who burns the american flag. but together with the other imagery that they selected for that cover, they selected kinky hair BECAUSE of the meaning it conveys. not because it is 'just hair.'

yknow?



on fubu and 'urban' fashion - meh. i am ITA with the PP who said she doesn't pay money for the right to advertise for others. i have never been into labels and i don't think a name brand is a valid substitution for style or quality.


why am i rambling so long? oh i dunno. it's late. hee hee!
Omg, you sound a lot like me in many ways. More later, I am in need of coffee!

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#246 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 03:35 PM
 
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A hair question for those that are natural and WOTH:

Do you straighten your hair for job interviews?

+ + =
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#247 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 05:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by piad View Post
A hair question for those that are natural and WOTH:

Do you straighten your hair for job interviews?
Nope. To be honest even before I loced 4 years ago I would just wear my hair the way I always wore it. My thoughts are that would I want to work at a place that had issues with my hair, probably not. Plus living in the whitest state in America, it would seem silly for me to straighten my hair anyway. I have been natural 8-9 years and aside from the year I stayed home after dd was born, I have always worked since being natural. I have never had issues with my hair, to be honest I sometimes wish folks would not comment on my hair, my hair is mid-back length and always folks around here comment, generally someone who has never seen locs and thinks they are braids. LOL

Oyinmama, reading about your family history reminds me of how diverse the experience can be within a Black family and how elistism plays out in Black families. Like you my folks were a mixed family, my Dad straight from the south, son of sharecroppers but my Mom's folks were racially mixed Black/Mexican and had a few coins and property. It was interesting to say the least anytime the whole family came together. My folks definitely had color issues since my Mom was the darkest person in her family, to the point her Dad's family questioned if she was really his . My great-Grandma is fair with blue eyes, most of that side is Lena Horne color.. my Mom though was not and neither are me or my brother.

Its interesting to me that so many of the WOC who come here to MDC are a bit at times outside the box of how some would decribe Blackness yet we are still very much Black. I actually find that at a lot of Black boards I frequent, sistas who were the nerds in HS, or like me listened to white music back in the mid 80's.. I often wonder where ya'll were when I was a kid.

Shay

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#248 of 2776 Old 08-03-2008, 07:05 PM
 
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Nope. To be honest even before I loced 4 years ago I would just wear my hair the way I always wore it. My thoughts are that would I want to work at a place that had issues with my hair, probably not. Plus living in the whitest state in America, it would seem silly for me to straighten my hair anyway. I have been natural 8-9 years and aside from the year I stayed home after dd was born, I have always worked since being natural. I have never had issues with my hair, to be honest I sometimes wish folks would not comment on my hair, my hair is mid-back length and always folks around here comment, generally someone who has never seen locs and thinks they are braids. LOL

Oyinmama, reading about your family history reminds me of how diverse the experience can be within a Black family and how elistism plays out in Black families. Like you my folks were a mixed family, my Dad straight from the south, son of sharecroppers but my Mom's folks were racially mixed Black/Mexican and had a few coins and property. It was interesting to say the least anytime the whole family came together. My folks definitely had color issues since my Mom was the darkest person in her family, to the point her Dad's family questioned if she was really his . My great-Grandma is fair with blue eyes, most of that side is Lena Horne color.. my Mom though was not and neither are me or my brother.

Its interesting to me that so many of the WOC who come here to MDC are a bit at times outside the box of how some would decribe Blackness yet we are still very much Black. I actually find that at a lot of Black boards I frequent, sistas who were the nerds in HS, or like me listened to white music back in the mid 80's.. I often wonder where ya'll were when I was a kid.

Shay

I know, right? It would have made my teen years a lot easier and perhaps more fun. *sigh*

I definitely do not change my hair when I was going on job interviews, etc. My thing was, accept me for who I am or spare me the trouble and don't hire me.

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#249 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 06:54 AM
 
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A hair question for those that are natural and WOTH:

Do you straighten your hair for job interviews?
No, although I do wear it back in a bun when I want to look conservative. I don't have locs, by the way.

Sheila, mother to William and Min Hee, wife of David
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#250 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 06:57 AM
 
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I actually find that at a lot of Black boards I frequent, sistas who were the nerds in HS, or like me listened to white music back in the mid 80's.. I often wonder where ya'll were when I was a kid.

Shay
We were home listening to Duran Duran, reading sci fi novels.
Anyway, I guess my experience was a little different considering my mother is Korean, but on my father's side of the family, we come for a large family of very proud black folks. As in most black families, my aunts and uncles ran the gamut in terms of color (my grandmother was dark and my grandfather was almost light enough to pass). I never really noticed any colorism in my family growing up, although I am told that my grandfather, who died when I was about 2, really favored me and made comments about my "olive skin". Anyway,I come from strong, God-fearing, poor black folks who stressed education above everything. I am blessed.

Sheila, mother to William and Min Hee, wife of David
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#251 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 09:37 AM
 
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We were home listening to Duran Duran, reading sci fi novels.
I was a huge Duran Duran fan, all the albums and posters on my walls . I got a lot of ribbing from family about my love of Duran Duran.

Mothering since 1992...its one of the many hats I wear.
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#252 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 10:17 AM
 
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Hey I am still reading the sci fi novels. We weren't supposed to stop where we?

Shanese mom of 2ds
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#253 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 10:41 AM
 
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We were home listening to Duran Duran, reading sci fi novels.
Anyway, I guess my experience was a little different considering my mother is Korean, but on my father's side of the family, we come for a large family of very proud black folks. As in most black families, my aunts and uncles ran the gamut in terms of color (my grandmother was dark and my grandfather was almost light enough to pass). I never really noticed any colorism in my family growing up, although I am told that my grandfather, who died when I was about 2, really favored me and made comments about my "olive skin". Anyway,I come from strong, God-fearing, poor black folks who stressed education above everything. I am blessed.
Wow, reading that warmed my heart. I really wished that we would stop focusing so much on the differences that separate us, but look for the things that unify us. My mom tells me stories of how her extended family didn't want her to marry my dad because he was too dark. The irony is that my mom is darked skin! It changed when they thought he "came from money".
My mom's family is very haughty and believes that the light tone of their skin and educational status makes them "special". I sort of understand it in the context of racism and classism; what I don't get is why it is perpetuated in this day and age. My mom looks at her extended family and shakes her head in disgust,but was determined not to raise her children with such silly, self loathing beliefs!
I think black folks, in particular, continue to struggle for acceptance by the wider population, so we look for things that make us appear acceptable, ie hair, skin, style of dress, etc. Growing up, I bought into that, because I longed to be accepted by my white peers. As I got older and my world expanded, so did my sense of self. I was always a natural leaning, bohemian styled person, but I evolved the more I realized being a beautiful natural living and loving black woman was a great thing!
As some of you know, I just returned from "The Vineyard". It has a very long history of being the vacation spot for well to do black folk. However, there is also a distasteful history of discrimination amongst blacks who were darked skinned. If you didn't pass the "paper bag test", you were not accepted into the social gatherings. My granddad used to visit the vineyard back in the 50's. Ironically, he would have been allowed in homes that I, as a dark skinned person, would not have been. Weird, eh? It is no longer that way, well at least not obviously so. I thought about you all while I was there. I saw you in the faces of the black and multi racial women I passed on the streets. One very light skinned woman had her baby in a sling as her white partner held her hand. I remember a dark skinned woman rocking a head of huge natural hair, with her birkenstocks and scents of patcholi. There were spanish women from all over who were obviously proud of their banging bodies and style!! I was like, "dang--there are some pretty women here!"
I stayed up the street from one of the most beautiful homes I have ever seen and later learned that it was owned by the inventor of norton antivirus. His wife is a black woman! There were all types of family compositions in the "ink well". It is truly my happy place!!
Oh yeah, I saw Spike Lee who was rocking a Yankees flag in front of his home. Did I mention it is red sox territory!??! So typical Spike.
Anyway, that's my humble contribution to this great conversation

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#254 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 11:32 AM
 
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Oh yeah, I saw Spike Lee who was rocking a Yankees flag in front of his home. Did I mention it is red sox territory!??! So typical Spike.
Anyway, that's my humble contribution to this great conversation
Spike is bold up here in Sox Nation.

Mothering since 1992...its one of the many hats I wear.
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#255 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 11:38 AM
 
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Spike is bold up here in Sox Nation.

I overheard this guy with a very heavy Boston accent, talking about how much he hated Spike After seeing that Yankee's Flag, I totally got it!

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#256 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 12:09 PM
 
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A hair question for those that are natural and WOTH:

Do you straighten your hair for job interviews?
I wear a bun for interviews. My hair is about bra strap length so its pretty easy to wear it back.
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#257 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 01:39 PM
 
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I actually find that at a lot of Black boards I frequent, sistas who were the nerds in HS, or like me listened to white music back in the mid 80's.. I often wonder where ya'll were when I was a kid.
Shay
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I know, right? It would have made my teen years a lot easier and perhaps more fun. *sigh*
mmmmmmm hmm!!

although, sometimes when i am feeling philosophical, i wonder how much the 'outsiderness' itself contributes to the experience. yknow? i went to a large, diverse HBCU center and most of the close friends i have now, i met then - i think there were finally enough of a concentration of black folks around for us to stumble across other 'alternablacks' like ourselves. but almost all of us had had that experience of being the 'only' - the only one in AP physics, the only one at the duran duran concert, the only one reading ursula k. leguin or octavia butler novels, whatever. and i think it is a big part of what turned us into the iconoclastic, individualistic people that we are. which, i wouldn't trade for the world, even though growing up was a little lonely at times.
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#258 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 01:47 PM
 
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@ purplegirl - thanks for the martha's vineyard stories... makes me smile. my great aunt used to run a guest house in oak bluffs so, even though my parents didn't have money, we used to go every summer when young children ... my mom or one of the cousins was always helping with the books and me and my sister would carry sheets and towels to the rooms or fill juice glasses at breakfast, LOL! it was a great time to see extended family and a wonderful, comfortable, homey vacation situation. i haven't been since she sold the houses when i was a teenager, but now that i have a little one maybe i'll think about reviving that tradition. . .perhaps next year when he'll be old enough to fit on the back of a bicycle. when we were little it was a wonderful experience; the beach choked with black sunbathers @ the inkwell, walking by ourselves early in the morning to pick up apple fritters at the bakery, watching them make fudge and pull saltwater taffy in the window of the chocolate shop, making friends with enough of the neighborhood cops to get a little police pin @ the precinct, and of course catching the rings at flying horses. good stuff.

the tradition of MV is indeed an interesting one, proud and affirming, but not without certain embarrassments/conflicts for today's Progressive Negro around the history of color and class... i remember my grandmother (who looked and behaved like a foulmouthed lena horne) smoking her cigarette and bitterly complaining about MV's cliquishness. she'd be like, 'why would i want to go up there and be around the same idiots i can see down here?' this is the same woman who, when the 'good hair' concept came up in conversation, would snap, "don't be ridiculous. if it grows out of your head it's good hair."

lol my grandma was the greatest

& LOL @ spike lee!! is brooklyn in the house??!!
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#259 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 01:53 PM
 
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In HS, my friends and I were outside the box and yes, we were nerds (although I don't think we would have admitted it back then). Going to a math and science high school and liking things like Star Trek helped.
LOL - so true! it's part of why me and the hubster had to make the t-shirts. so many years spent ashamed, hiding the nerdly truth!!

we had to take back the night.
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#260 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 02:02 PM
 
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@ purplegirl - thanks for the martha's vineyard stories... makes me smile. my great aunt used to run a guest house in oak bluffs so, even though my parents didn't have money, we used to go every summer when young children ... my mom or one of the cousins was always helping with the books and me and my sister would carry sheets and towels to the rooms or fill juice glasses at breakfast, LOL! it was a great time to see extended family and a wonderful, comfortable, homey vacation situation. i haven't been since she sold the houses when i was a teenager, but now that i have a little one maybe i'll think about reviving that tradition. . .perhaps next year when he'll be old enough to fit on the back of a bicycle. when we were little it was a wonderful experience; the beach choked with black sunbathers @ the inkwell, walking by ourselves early in the morning to pick up apple fritters at the bakery, watching them make fudge and pull saltwater taffy in the window of the chocolate shop, making friends with enough of the neighborhood cops to get a little police pin @ the precinct, and of course catching the rings at flying horses. good stuff.

the tradition of MV is indeed an interesting one, proud and affirming, but not without certain embarrassments/conflicts for today's Progressive Negro around the history of color and class... i remember my grandmother (who looked and behaved like a foulmouthed lena horne) smoking her cigarette and bitterly complaining about MV's cliquishness. she'd be like, 'why would i want to go up there and be around the same idiots i can see down here?' this is the same woman who, when the 'good hair' concept came up in conversation, would snap, "don't be ridiculous. if it grows out of your head it's good hair."

lol my grandma was the greatest

& LOL @ spike lee!! is brooklyn in the house??!!

Omg. I love it That's my kinda woman!!
You should definitely go back to the vineyard. You have a lot more history there than I do. The same charm is there but the diversity of folks has grown.

I discovered this art gallery called Feather Stone. It was magical and guess, what--a black woman is the executive director. I spent hours there, walked the labyrinth and hiked the trails on the property. If you go next year, be sure to let me know!

afro.jpg
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#261 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 02:21 PM
 
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@Purplegirl & Oyinmama, all this talk about MV is making me think maybe next summer I should go down there. Its less than 2 hours from me and might make for a good close to home vacation.

Mothering since 1992...its one of the many hats I wear.
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#262 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 02:26 PM
 
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@Purplegirl & Oyinmama, all this talk about MV is making me think maybe next summer I should go down there. Its less than 2 hours from me and might make for a good close to home vacation.
Girl, what are you waiting for? From what I have gleaned, you'd love it and feel right at home! If you want to go, start planning now. It gets crazy busy and getting a ferry reservation for your car, becomes nearly impossible after Jan. I cannot recommend the place we stayed this year, but I certainly can vouch for the spot we previously rented. I can get you the info, if you'd like.:

afro.jpg
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#263 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 05:49 PM
 
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Girl, what are you waiting for? From what I have gleaned, you'd love it and feel right at home! If you want to go, start planning now. It gets crazy busy and getting a ferry reservation for your car, becomes nearly impossible after Jan. I cannot recommend the place we stayed this year, but I certainly can vouch for the spot we previously rented. I can get you the info, if you'd like.:
Please share your information with me too! I want to take DS to the beach for his 3rd birthday, but I was unsure as too which one. Since you spoke of traveling to MV I have looked up information on the island and contacted my cousin who visits the area frequently.




As for straightning my hair, I have not done so for interviews. However I do plan on straightning my hair when I take pictures for my med school aplications. Whichever pictures look best I will submit.

+ + =
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#264 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 07:29 PM
 
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A hair question for those that are natural and WOTH:

Do you straighten your hair for job interviews?
never!

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#265 of 2776 Old 08-04-2008, 09:48 PM
 
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Please share your information with me too! I want to take DS to the beach for his 3rd birthday, but I was unsure as too which one. Since you spoke of traveling to MV I have looked up information on the island and contacted my cousin who visits the area frequently.




As for straightning my hair, I have not done so for interviews. However I do plan on straightning my hair when I take pictures for my med school aplications. Whichever pictures look best I will submit.
PM me and I'll be glad to share with you all I know :

afro.jpg
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#266 of 2776 Old 08-05-2008, 12:02 PM
 
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LOL - so true! it's part of why me and the hubster had to make the t-shirts. so many years spent ashamed, hiding the nerdly truth!!

we had to take back the night.

I almost got one of those shirts, I think, if you were the one selling them online!

Sheila, mother to William and Min Hee, wife of David
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#267 of 2776 Old 08-05-2008, 01:22 PM
 
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Can I tell yall how excited I am to see this thread popping again: It's also especially nice to see mamas that I have encountered on other parts of MDC join our tribe!!

afro.jpg
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#268 of 2776 Old 08-05-2008, 05:40 PM
 
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Hey mamas! I just wanted to pop in and say I am so sorry for unpleasantness that was on this thread earlier, and to thank all of you who reported/PM'd rather than trying to deal with the poster yourself. I wasn't sure whether to post this or not, but it really did make "clean up" easier. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

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#269 of 2776 Old 08-05-2008, 06:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Well... i guess i'm glad i missed it.

I loaded videos of the oldest three kids to the net. The catch is that you have to be my Facebook friend to see them. PM me if you can't find me and you'd like to do so.

The kids are discussing some mythical creature they refer to as "The Next Baby." I told them that no, there would be no more babies. "Oh, you might get one next year!" says Bean. "From where?" "From an egg," he says. "Inside your body, because you're a mammal." : "There will be NO MORE BABIES in this house." "There might be... next year you can fertilize an egg and then we'll have another baby. I'd like to see another baby boy like Bear."

: : Child's gone and lost his MIND.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#270 of 2776 Old 08-05-2008, 10:49 PM
 
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Ok, im mad i missed the past few days convo (ive finally caught up), but im choosing not to misdirect the flow of the current chat to give my less than 2 cents about what was discussed, lol.

Only thing I want to comment on is,...I wish I would try to straighten my hair for a j.o.b. lol. Other than it being impossible to do (i have locks down to my butt), i think that if they have a problem with my hair during the interview, they just did me a huge favor, because not only are they interviewing me, im interviewing THEM and they FAIL my interview at that point and would promptly be dismissed as a possible employer.

NMY actively making my dreams happen :
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