moving to NYC area: city or burbs? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 34 Old 02-10-2011, 08:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you!

 

We're going to see what's available in Brooklyn just for fun. BUT, Linda, you mentioned so many things that are important to us! I did not like that subway commute AT ALL, and i only stayed in Brooklyn for a week! I don't think my husband would love that, honestly...the train sounds much more appealing.

 

Funny that you're in Rye! That's one of the places we are looking. One of dh's colleagues moved there over the summer and they are positively euphoric about it. haha We are definitely going to check it out...and also Greenwich over the border in CT for the easier homeschool laws...it's not too much further along on the train line and may save us a lot of hassle. I'm so glad to hear that you get into the city often still...I was worried that we might not...that we might feel too cut off. Thanks so much for the helpful response!


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#32 of 34 Old 02-11-2011, 05:26 PM
 
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You may have stayed further out in Brooklyn, if you're remembering an annoying subway commute.  From Park Slope or Carroll Gardens area (i.e. "Brownstone Brooklyn"), the subway commute is really, really easy...  I do the reverse commute (Manhattan to Brooklyn) everyday and it takes me 30 minutes door to door, 15 minutes on the train.  Going out of the city and taking a commuter train would take significantly longer than 30 minutes door to door.  Commuting from Brooklyn is no harder than commuting from uptown, it's only about 4 stops from downtown Manhattan.

 

If you do decide to stay in Greenwich, it's...  well, I'm sure there are many people who like it, and it's not much different from any other uber-rich snotty area, but it certainly isn't offering an interesting unique living experience. 

 

I know I've been pushing Brooklyn a lot, but I really think there is no where else like Park Slope in the world, *maybe* Berkley comes close.  It's not for everyone, but it's certainly a very unique experience.  And with some money you can get great space, indoors and out.  And there is an active homeschooling community and Brooklyn Free School is a truly democratic school.  And the biggest food co-op in the country.  The co-op is a reason in itself people move there!  And Prospect Park as your backyard is really lovely every season. 

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#33 of 34 Old 02-12-2011, 08:22 AM
 
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Wanted to put in some thoughts (again) I've had after following for a bit. 

 

I am the type that thrives in a more natural setting; I like to wake up and have peace, walk outside and not see anyone (or if anyone is around they are not right.there.) Living here (again I live right across the river Weehawken) makes that challenging. Because while I have my outdoor space and home, the houses are right next to each other and when I'm gardening there's always someone outside as well (which may sound like a lame complaint, but I like my privacy!..) It's lovely to walk down the road and greet people but all that interaction wears me out. When we do want nature (real nature, not a small park) we have to travel 45 minutes or so. I know there's fantastic parks in the city, but they are fantastic parks filled with people. It's beautiful and fun but not peaceful.


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#34 of 34 Old 02-25-2011, 01:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair View Post

You may have stayed further out in Brooklyn, if you're remembering an annoying subway commute.  From Park Slope or Carroll Gardens area (i.e. "Brownstone Brooklyn"), the subway commute is really, really easy...  I do the reverse commute (Manhattan to Brooklyn) everyday and it takes me 30 minutes door to door, 15 minutes on the train.  Going out of the city and taking a commuter train would take significantly longer than 30 minutes door to door.  Commuting from Brooklyn is no harder than commuting from uptown, it's only about 4 stops from downtown Manhattan.

 

If you do decide to stay in Greenwich, it's...  well, I'm sure there are many people who like it, and it's not much different from any other uber-rich snotty area, but it certainly isn't offering an interesting unique living experience. 

 

I know I've been pushing Brooklyn a lot, but I really think there is no where else like Park Slope in the world, *maybe* Berkley comes close.  It's not for everyone, but it's certainly a very unique experience.  And with some money you can get great space, indoors and out.  And there is an active homeschooling community and Brooklyn Free School is a truly democratic school.  And the biggest food co-op in the country.  The co-op is a reason in itself people move there!  And Prospect Park as your backyard is really lovely every season. 


I "heart" Brooklyn too, although I don't live in Park Slope but my daughter goes to Montessori school there.  We're in Bay Ridge, but belong to the Park Slope food co-op.  I'm all for pushing Brooklyn too, we have been here almost 20 years and love it!  We do live a little deeper into Brooklyn but we're right on the bay and our neighborhood (while not having the crunch factor of Park Slope and its environs) is really, really culturally diverse.  There is a little more space down there, which we've grown accustomed to (I've trained for marathons on the Shore promenade for years).  Brooklyn to me has never really lost its identity as a separate and distinct place from the rest of the city.  We really consider it home and will for a long time.

 

Also echoing previous sentiment regarding midtown.  I work in midtown and couldn't be happier every day when I'm leaving it.  Aside from the extreme east and west parts of midtown, it feels very corporate and touristy to me. 
 


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