best hospital-based midwife groups in South Jersey/Philly? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 30 Old 09-26-2011, 08:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Hi,

I'm planning a homebirth (my 2nd), but will be in South Jersey (Cherry Hill area) for Thanksgiving at 36 weeks pregnant. My midwives say they're comfortable with that if I am, but they've assigned me to have the names of some hospital-based practices that I would feel comfortable going to in the unlikely situation that I went into labor while in the area of Thanksgiving. They say that at 36 weeks, it would be too early to try for a homebirth, so I should instead find a good hospital-based midwife practice.

I'm not planning to have any relationship with this practice in advance -- it's more that if my water broke and labor started, which hospital should I head to where I'll be able to request midwives, where the staff will be comfortable honoring my wishes for a low-intervention birth?

Recommendations?
indigosky is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 30 Old 09-30-2011, 07:51 AM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm not sure that any hospital has covering midwives that would attend a random birth.  Maybe Pennsylvania Hospital in Philly? They have a big midwifery group.  If you go to www.icanofnj.com, you can check out area hospitals birth stats which includes c-section and epidural rates, as well as # of births attended by midwives. 


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#3 of 30 Old 09-30-2011, 08:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
The link to the ICAN site with all the statistics is great! Some definitely emerge as winners! Is there an easy way to get equivalent data for Philadelphia or PA hospitals?

Thanks!
indigosky is offline  
#4 of 30 Old 10-01-2011, 06:01 PM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=809799&mode=2

 

Hopefully that link works for you.  Just scroll down to find method of delivery.  At least that gives you an idea of what hospitals to avoid and which are probably fairly decent!  :)


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#5 of 30 Old 10-01-2011, 06:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Thanks. Does PA not collect the same hospital-by-hopsital info that NJ apparently does about episiotomy rates, % of women with epidurals, % of midwife-attended births, etc?

What I'd love to figure out from the statistics is, given that if I just showed up I'm not likely to have much control over my care provider, which of the Philadelphia hospitals have nursing staffs who are accustomed to supporting natural, low-intervention births? And which have higher percentages of midwives (possibly, but not necessarily, the same thing), which may increase the chance of my being able to get one as a "drop-in"?
indigosky is offline  
#6 of 30 Old 10-02-2011, 07:08 PM
 
tbone_kneegrabber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Philly
Posts: 2,748
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Pennsy has a large midwifery group.  They also have a birthing suite (well they did 4 years ago when ds was born, they keep threatening to close it due to funding so I can't actually speak to right now).  Their policy used to be that everyone was assigned to the midwives unless there was a reason to go to an OB.

 

I had a really great experience laboring in the birth suite (and eventually delivering in labor and deliver)

tbone_kneegrabber is offline  
#7 of 30 Old 10-02-2011, 07:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Two clarification questions:

The hospital with the big midwife group that everyone is referring to is Pennsylvania Hospital, right? Not the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania? It seems very confusing since from what I can tell, Pennsylvania Hospital is also part of the U. of Penn? (Or do I have this all mixed up?)

Second, if Pennsylvania Hospital has this large midwifery group that many people seem to be fond of, why is their cesarean rate 38%, significantly higher than the national average? Are the midwives still such a small percentage of all the births that take place there, because it's huge and there are many high-intervention OBs?

Since I won't have the "protection" of an advance relationship with a provider I've selected, a cesarean rate that high overall scares me... I'm realizing that maybe the institutional attitudes and assumptions may matter more than the number of midwives.

Thoughts and insights?
indigosky is offline  
#8 of 30 Old 10-03-2011, 09:59 AM
 
klk197's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 148
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Pennsylvania Hospital (aka Pennsy) is the institution referred to here and its at 8th and Spruce Streets in Center City.  It is part of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, but not the Hospital of the U of P which is in West Philadelphia/University City--Yes, so confusing!

 

There is a recent thread discussing the C rates of Philly hospitals with links that you may find helpful: http://www.mothering.com/community/t/1325857/hahneman-or-pennsylvania-hospital-for-delivery

 

What the data doesn't show, however, and I think was overlooked in the above thread/link, is the population this hospital serves.  Unfortunately, not every mother is prepared as the average Mothering reader.  Pennsy is in a rather posh neighborhood, which can be deceiving.  It is also located in the 2nd hungriest Congressional district in the country, and this reverberates in many aspects of community life.  Just blocks from my home are families living in extreme poverty.  I ride public transportation almost daily, and there are advertisements inside busses and subways urging pregnant women to seek prenatal care.  The local public school around the corner is home to children who speak 16 different languages in their homes, and many are the children of illegal immigrants.  I choose to live here because it is a dynamic, yet challenged, community.  

 

I didn't understand how this would impact the hospital until I gave birth there myself--and in my case I had a great experience with a midwife, but now know how its potentially difficult for many other families.  I was the only native-English speaker my postpartum nurse was caring for--she told me this to apologize for returneing to my room at the exact time she had promised (for a non-urgent issue) and much was getting lost in translation.  I was also delayed being discharged because much of the nursing staff was busy trying to communicate to another new mother that she needed a car seat to bring her newborn in a car to go home.  I can only imagine how communication troubles alone contribute to labor and delivery problems, and possibly compounded by poor prenatal care/health or cultural beliefs. . . Among my own demographic, "high risk" pregnancies are related to age, previous Cs, blood pressure, etc; yet in the greater community many other factors are at play contributing to less than ideal deliveries and the high C rate.  The hospital is actively working to reduce the C rate--the laborist model is part of their strategy--but there are broader social issues that the hospital can only be a small part in solving.

 

Good luck, and of course, this is just the view from where I stand. . . 

klk197 is offline  
#9 of 30 Old 10-03-2011, 05:22 PM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't think Pennsy's c-section rate is too far off from the suburban hospitals though. Why would a poor woman or a woman who doesn't speak English be more likely to need a c-section?   In NJ, you are better off in the inner city hospitals.  They have the lower c-section rates (e.g. Cooper) even though they are also the ones with the best NICUs.  The midwives at Pennsy tend to have a good reputation but my aunt was pushed into 2 c-sections with them about 8 and 15 years ago.    There are a lot of them though so who knows if the midwife she had is still there. That being said, it doesn't matter where you go.  You need to be educated on birth (which, as the pp mentioned, you probably are since you are posting here!) and know when to call the care provider on their BS.


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#10 of 30 Old 10-03-2011, 09:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I'm definitely educated on birth -- I'm an experienced, certified doula who's attended MANY other women's hospital births, and had a very uncomplicated homebirth with my own first. So I'm totally prepared to call staff on BS. However, if I were to wind up in a hospital far from home because something wacky happens near the end of my pregnancy, I'd rather not have to battle the nursing staff to have the kind of birth I'd like!

Which hospital do you think has nursing staff that are most comfortable with a very low-intervention, probably drug-free birth: Hahnemann, Einstein, or Our Lady of Lourdes in NJ? I think I've probably narrowed it down to those three. I wish PA provided data on rates of epidural use and episiotomies. I'm not too concerned about being "tricked" into things (I'll be yelling, "I do not consent! I do not consent!"), but they do seem like helpful indicators of hospital culture. Especially the culture of the nursing staff, which in my experience often has the biggest impact on how the hours of labor go.
indigosky is offline  
#11 of 30 Old 10-06-2011, 09:27 PM
 
MrsMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by indigosky View Post

I'm definitely educated on birth -- I'm an experienced, certified doula who's attended MANY other women's hospital births, and had a very uncomplicated homebirth with my own first. So I'm totally prepared to call staff on BS. However, if I were to wind up in a hospital far from home because something wacky happens near the end of my pregnancy, I'd rather not have to battle the nursing staff to have the kind of birth I'd like!
Which hospital do you think has nursing staff that are most comfortable with a very low-intervention, probably drug-free birth: Hahnemann, Einstein, or Our Lady of Lourdes in NJ? I think I've probably narrowed it down to those three. I wish PA provided data on rates of epidural use and episiotomies. I'm not too concerned about being "tricked" into things (I'll be yelling, "I do not consent! I do not consent!"), but they do seem like helpful indicators of hospital culture. Especially the culture of the nursing staff, which in my experience often has the biggest impact on how the hours of labor go.


Stay out of Hahnemann and Einstein. I don't have much experience with Einstein, just what I've heard from others. I know a few people who work at Hahnemann, directly with maternity, and it's not the place you want to be for a peaceful and intervention-free birth. There are L&D nurses there who are very critical of the whole natural birth movement and they WILL fight you. Plus, the quality of care isn't the best, depending on what night you are there.

 


Jenn treehugger.gifmama to Monkeylearning.gifSquishyenergy.gif& Riverangel1.gif(8wks)Wife to Mikejog.gif See you at the rainbow1284.gif Bridge, Abigael cat.gifand McKenna dog2.gifgd.gifnamaste.giffamilybed2.gifbellyhair.gifcaffix.gifcrochetsmilie.gifom.gifknit.gifcomputergeek2.gif

MrsMike is offline  
#12 of 30 Old 10-07-2011, 05:01 PM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

I don't know how much this affects the stats, but the high risk mothers I've known in Philly seem to prefer Pennsy--and the CS rate for them is always high, everywhere. I'd be interested to see CS stats for the MFM group vs the midwifery group. (For that matter, I've seen stats skewed in the other direction: providers and hospitals that have outstanding statistics because they handle few complications.)

 

Disadvantaged populations often have higher rates of complications. More hypertension. More diabetes. More teen pregnancy. More poor prenatal care and social factors affecting pregnancy and birth. I've seen both extremes in communities like this--midwifery based programs aimed at the low risk, which have low CS rates, and lots of high risk pregnancies resulting in high rates of intervention. You have to go by reputation and not make assumptions that everyone is dealing with the same patient pool.


DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#13 of 30 Old 10-07-2011, 07:56 PM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post

I don't know how much this affects the stats, but the high risk mothers I've known in Philly seem to prefer Pennsy--and the CS rate for them is always high, everywhere. I'd be interested to see CS stats for the MFM group vs the midwifery group. (For that matter, I've seen stats skewed in the other direction: providers and hospitals that have outstanding statistics because they handle few complications.)

 

Disadvantaged populations often have higher rates of complications. More hypertension. More diabetes. More teen pregnancy. More poor prenatal care and social factors affecting pregnancy and birth. I've seen both extremes in communities like this--midwifery based programs aimed at the low risk, which have low CS rates, and lots of high risk pregnancies resulting in high rates of intervention. You have to go by reputation and not make assumptions that everyone is dealing with the same patient pool.




That argument sounds good but doesn't actually pan out when you look more in depth at hospitals.

 

Cooper Medical in Camden has a 26.7% c-section rate.  They have a level III NICU and are located in a poor area (not far from Pennsy).

 

St Barnabas and Monmouth Medical are in the same health care system in NJ.  They both have level III NICUs and handle high risk births.  St Barnabas has a 45.6% c-section rate while Monmouth Medical has a 24.9% c-section rate.  Makes no sense. 

 

I kind of have to disagree that you go just by reputation.  People are "wow-ed" by technology and advanced NICUs.  There are many people in North Jersey who think you are crazy NOT to birth at St Barnabas.  But if you want a natural birth, they aren't exactly what you are looking for.

 

That all being said....  my sister had a baby at Our Lady of Lourdes.  Her doctor started talking c-section  while she was pushing b/c the baby was posterior.  Her nurse got aggressive and brought in the squat bar and wrapped a towel around it.  I think her nurse probably saved her from a c-section.  But that's one good nurse.  My sister was also induced for reaching 41 weeks (heaven forbid!!!).

 

My personal suggestion (assuming you have time) is to drive up to Capital Health in Trenton and birth there.  The covering group is Obs and midwives (not sure if you could request a midwife but it doesn't hurt to ask!).  Almost 40% of their births are attended by midwives so it is a midwife-friendly culture.  They probably won't bat an eye if you refuse interventions.  They have wireless monitors there so if you need to be monitored you can still walk around and use the showers/tubs, etc.


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#14 of 30 Old 10-08-2011, 08:32 AM
 
AnastasiaM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: South Jersey (near Cherry Hill)
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I am seeing midwives from Pennsylvania Hospital, and am planning to deliver there.  I do not like doctors, and simply do not go to them for the most part.  I have incredbly high anxiety about medical issues. 

 

I've only been in twice, but the two midwives I saw were TERRIFIC.  They were gentle (I had never had an internal exam before; they did one the first time, and I can't IMAGINE having some of the doctors I've seen in the past do that); gave me tons of information, were very supportive, and explained everything; they gave me choices about a number of procedures, and discouraged me from having any of the unnecessary tests done (which I wouldn't have wanted anyway, but it was nice to hear them say that).   I came away feeling 100% better about everything.  I do still need to ask alot of questions, because I have only recently been reading more about birth and want to be sure that I will have the options at the hospital that I need.  However, I also feel that anything-can-happen-anywhere: no guarantees that everything will go smoothly, no guarantees about who will be on-call, etc., and at some point I needed to stop making myself sick and relax a little bit. 

 

I was very, very concerned about the 1 in 3 caesarean rate at the hospital however.  While I want to do whatever it will take to keep my baby alive, having a c-section is about the worst fear I have (never had an operation or stiches for anything, other than dental work; for some reason I'm totally okay with any amount of extensive dental work); and having an epidural sounds pretty horrifying as well.  I asked about the rate last appointment, and the midwife told me that for the midwives, the rate is more like 15% for a first baby, and after you have one vaginal birth, that goes way down.  She also explained that because Pennsylvania Hospital has such a specialty in obstretrics, they see alot of high-risk mothers.  Which makes sense to me, because I know people in the area with major problems who chose Pennsylvania for that reason. 

 

I'm still a little nervous (been reading Ina May's book and wishing I could go to the Farm!), but I feel ALOT more positive than I did at the beginning. 

AnastasiaM is offline  
#15 of 30 Old 10-08-2011, 12:25 PM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
By reputation, I don't just mean NICUs and so on--I mean women's experiences delivering there, their reputation for being mother-baby friendly, etc. where I am currently, the hospital with the better CS rate (terrible VBAC, though) is the one with the outdated policies on L&D.

Stats do matter--aside from really unusual cases like the CHOP delivery unit, the units with really high CS rates tend to be practicing in ways that inflate that rate, and there's really no justification for these 45-50% rates some NJ hospitals are posting. But I've seen too many flaky figures to ever pick a hospital on stats alone. Pennsy's stats are higher than I would like to see, but I think it's a more complex situation and you can't make assumptions about how you would fare. (there are hospitals where I would not say that, btw... Though you can always be surprised; a friend had twins vaginally at Hackensack recently!)

DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#16 of 30 Old 10-08-2011, 12:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlm194 View Post

My personal suggestion (assuming you have time) is to drive up to Capital Health in Trenton and birth there.  The covering group is Obs and midwives (not sure if you could request a midwife but it doesn't hurt to ask!).  Almost 40% of their births are attended by midwives so it is a midwife-friendly culture.  They probably won't bat an eye if you refuse interventions.

Interesting recommendation. The rate of midwife-attended births sounds great, and 38% of their vaginal births are unmedicated, which is very high comparatively. But according to the numbers I got from one of the links someone provided above, Capital Health's c-section rate is 34%, higher than the national average, and higher than Our Lady of Lourdes (33% and very close to where I'll be), Einstein (30%), Cooper (also very close, 27%), and Hahnemann (26%). Capital also has a higher episiotomy rate than Lourdes and Cooper.

If I were going to travel that far, I think I'd be inclined to choose South Jersey Hospital, which would be about the same distance for me. South Jersey has a slightly higher percentage of midwife-attended births, roughly the same c-section rate, a lower rate of episiotomies, and the highest rate of unmedicated vaginal births in the state (57%). Is there any reason why Capital would be a better choice than South Jersey?

You're absolutely right, whoever said it could drive one crazy to make the decision based on stats alone -- they make no sense, especially in areas with so many hospitals! Where I live (many fewer hospitals), the stats seem to be more predictable -- the hospitals with higher percentages of midwife-attended births have dramatically lower c-section and other intervention rates.

indigosky is offline  
#17 of 30 Old 10-08-2011, 09:52 PM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't  know much about South Jersey so I can't really help there.  I had a baby at Capital health. I was a VBAC with an extremely long labor and I had no interventions pushed on my by my midwife or by the staff.  The staff didn't bat an eye about wanting to go without drugs.  I know the back up doctors there have been pretty comfortable with midwives which is a plus.  I know the midwives have positive things to say about the back up doctors.

 

To be honest, I'm kind of guessing that you are only going to go to a hospital in the area if you have a real issue.  In that case, most of these points will be moot anyway. 

 

ETA:  I think the South Jersey hospital you are talking about only has a basic nursery.  Probably not the right place to be with an early baby.  You'd want at least a level II NICU


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#18 of 30 Old 10-11-2011, 10:09 PM
 
breastmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

As far as a hospital, I didn't see anyone mention Elmer hospital...they do water births there (that's where I'm planning on birthing) and I'm guessing they have a list of midwives you can contact. It's about 45 minutes from Cherry Hill so I'm not sure if Philly is closer but it's an option

http://www.sjhealthcare.net/content/Elmer_MaternityCareCenter.htm

The midwife practice I'm going through is called Gentle Beginnings, which is about a mile or so from the hospital...

breastmama is offline  
#19 of 30 Old 10-12-2011, 08:51 AM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Isn't Elmer the South Jersey hospital the OP is referring to?  I'd really caution about going there with a preterm baby.  I think you'd want at least a level II NICU.


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#20 of 30 Old 10-12-2011, 03:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Yes, South Jersey Hospital is the same as Elmer (at least that's my understanding).

I would be 36 weeks around Thanksgiving (which is what I'm planning for). Is that earlier than would be safe to give birth there? I'll admit I don't know a lot about various levels of NICUs, and various degrees of prematurity. My DD1 (and all my mom's babies) were born at 38 1/2 weeks with easy, uncomplicated births.
indigosky is offline  
#21 of 30 Old 10-12-2011, 03:50 PM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

At 36 weeks, babies are usually okay but may have some difficulty. They normally don't have breathing issues but can be poor feeders (also true of 37 weekers, BTW). Your biggest risk would be jaundice, which is more common in late preemies and early term babies. You certainly don't need to plan on having a level III NICU (of course, any baby might need that, but you don't need to plan on it). Level I is basic well baby care, no capabilities for anything but the mildest illnesses. Level II is special care nurseries for babies over 28 weeks without serious issues--some schemes distinguish between nurseries with no capability for ventilation and ones that can do short term. Level III is for babies younger than 28 weeks offering a fuller spectrum of services.

 

I would probably want a Level II in this scenario unless I had reason to believe something was wrong. I have never given birth in a hospital without a NICU, but I have heard that because they don't have the ability to take care of anything, they transfer everything. Which, in the unlikely event this happens, would just be the worst scenario IMO.


DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#22 of 30 Old 10-13-2011, 02:14 PM
 
AnastasiaM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: South Jersey (near Cherry Hill)
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

It could take a good 40 minutes to get to Elmer from Cherry Hill, especially with Thanksgiving weekend traffic.

AnastasiaM is offline  
#23 of 30 Old 10-13-2011, 04:14 PM
 
dlm194's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

A hospital can't turn away a mom in labor so if you were close to delivery upon arrival, they would have to attend you.  If the baby was having issues, they'd transfer the baby but that does NOT mean they would transfer you (you can leave AMA, of course but it doesn't mean you'll be admitted into another hospital).  If you show up at a basic care nursery hospital about to give birth to a 36 weeker, I wouldn't count on then calling in midwives and assisting you in having a beautiful, peaceful low intervention birth.  Anything can happen of course and I'm not trying to be negative, just realistic.  I think it would be a crazy scene of them trying to call in an anesthesiologist and neonatologists because there is a good chance (at least a perceived good chance) your baby will have some issues.


Proud mommy 9/2004 ribboncesarean.gif , 11/2007 vbac.gif, 2/2011 ribboncesarean.gif
ICAN of New Jersey --> find 2010 NJ hospital birth stats here!

dlm194 is offline  
#24 of 30 Old 10-17-2011, 06:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
So it sounds like the consensus is against Elmer/South Jersey Hospital for a 36 weeker, even if it has the best stats.

So that brings me back to these options, I think:
Cooper
Einstein
Hahnemann
Our Lady of Lourdes

Do they all have Level II NICUs? Any more analysis to help me narrow it down?
indigosky is offline  
#25 of 30 Old 10-23-2011, 06:39 AM
 
mom2tatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: outside of Philly
Posts: 1,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnastasiaM View Post
 I asked about the rate last appointment, and the midwife told me that for the midwives, the rate is more like 15% for a first baby, and after you have one vaginal birth, that goes way down.


I'm sorry, I know you are feeling much better about your decision and that is good - but this rate is just false info. I don't know where she pulled this % from because it is very far off. Which midwife, can I ask? I've been there many times, mostly with women who are planning 'natural' births'. I really wish women would ask all of us doulas who attend births there enough to know a little (from an OUTSIDER's perspective). Many of us see quite a different story for our clients. And maybe we aren't doing a good enough job telling women the truth either b/c of a lack of a great hospital option in this area. Yes, the midwives can be great, I really like a few of them alot. And I have had a few smooth unmedicated births happen there. But also a lot of unplanned medicated ones and unplanned cesareans. But the hospital overall has a 96% epidural rate, I've heard training nurses tell this stat consistently to trainee nurses three different times. And the midwives attend a good chunk of births there actually. The birthing suites are rarely even used, and it seems such a bizarre thing to request when going into triage and you thought it would be much easier to just go in there with your shift midwife and have a baby without medication. It just doesn't look like that very often. It can, but it is NOT the norm. Not even for the midwife patients as they are led to believe. One midwife not too long ago said to me (after my client ended up with an epidural and was sleeping due to not being allowed in the birthing suites) that unfortunately most of their patients are ending up with epidurals and pitocin at some point, too, although they really try to prevent it. I asked why and she said sadly because of high rate of inductions or if that is avoided, women coming in to the hospital not really in a good active labor yet.

 

My advice as always is hire a doula. We can try to help you avoid both of those things from happening. In the end, though, it is your birth, your choices, your path! And I want people to be at peace with their choices of birth location and care provider, as always, but I just hate when women are lied to or led to believe their pregnancy and birth experience will most likely be what she wants when statistically, that is so far off from the truth. I'm tired of clients saying to me afterwards, "I just really wanted to believe xyz" or "I thought if I had the midwives there, that it'd be fine..." or things like that. Frustrating.


Already!?!?! cold.gif  ~ Lori, doula, childbirth educator, wife to Jermaine 6/04, and mom to two happy and energetic boys - Tatum 6/06 and Keegan 3/09

mom2tatum is offline  
#26 of 30 Old 10-23-2011, 06:45 AM
 
mom2tatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: outside of Philly
Posts: 1,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

Also to the OP, why are you so concerned about a labor transfer at 36 wks? I was, too, while planning my homebirth but b/c my first was born at 36 wks. Just curious. I'm sure it'll be fine, whatever place you decide to go if that is the case, though. I say the smaller the hospital, the better...especially in that situation. But most 36 wkers are totally fine and don't need NICU at all. Mine was on the small side, 4'13", and nothing medically required him to go NICU, just his weight being under 5 lbs - so I asked to keep him with me and eventually they agreed it was unreasonable to put him in there.

 

Best of luck!

 


Already!?!?! cold.gif  ~ Lori, doula, childbirth educator, wife to Jermaine 6/04, and mom to two happy and energetic boys - Tatum 6/06 and Keegan 3/09

mom2tatum is offline  
#27 of 30 Old 11-01-2011, 10:05 AM
 
MrsMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by indigosky View Post

So it sounds like the consensus is against Elmer/South Jersey Hospital for a 36 weeker, even if it has the best stats.
So that brings me back to these options, I think:
Cooper
Einstein
Hahnemann
Our Lady of Lourdes
Do they all have Level II NICUs? Any more analysis to help me narrow it down?


 Hahnemann is a Level III. Coming in a 36 weeks, you would have a very big fight to get a vaginal birth, let alone a natural birth. They are used to dealing with micro-preemies, drug babies and very critically ill babies. Many of their births are emergencies. The staff is used to seeing childbirth in an emergency setting with some need for intervention. A normal, natural birth is not common to them. As I mentioned before, several of the L&D staff members find natural birth laughable and the comments I have heard are extremely unsupportive. They used scare tactics with me (I did not birth there - but I know these people) and would say horrible untruths about birth. It is also a teaching hospital and you may end up with a few more people in the room than you like.I have a relative and a few friends who work there and I can attest that the level of care for you situation may not be what you're looking for. Also, it may be a pain in the butt to get there from Cherry Hill during the Thanksgiving holiday. I feel bad blasting them like this, but IME this hospital probably wouldn't be the best for your situation.

 


Jenn treehugger.gifmama to Monkeylearning.gifSquishyenergy.gif& Riverangel1.gif(8wks)Wife to Mikejog.gif See you at the rainbow1284.gif Bridge, Abigael cat.gifand McKenna dog2.gifgd.gifnamaste.giffamilybed2.gifbellyhair.gifcaffix.gifcrochetsmilie.gifom.gifknit.gifcomputergeek2.gif

MrsMike is offline  
#28 of 30 Old 11-01-2011, 05:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
OK -- the only reason Hahnemann is still on my list at all is because its cesarean rate is lower than any of the other hospitals on my "final contenders" list above.

I'll be near, not in, Cherry Hill -- 15 minutes from the downtown Philly hospitals. Of course, if I go into labor at some peak travel time and things seem to be moving quickly, I'll be forced to go to one of the super-close hospitals regardless of whether it's my first choice. But based on many decades of Thanksgivings in the Philadelphia/South Jersey area (including traveling back and forth between them, since I have parents in both places), I know over the range of all of Thanksgiving weekend, there are lots of times when traffic isn't a big deal at all.
indigosky is offline  
#29 of 30 Old 11-03-2011, 12:33 PM
 
MrsMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by indigosky View Post

OK -- the only reason Hahnemann is still on my list at all is because its cesarean rate is lower than any of the other hospitals on my "final contenders" list above.
I'll be near, not in, Cherry Hill -- 15 minutes from the downtown Philly hospitals. Of course, if I go into labor at some peak travel time and things seem to be moving quickly, I'll be forced to go to one of the super-close hospitals regardless of whether it's my first choice. But based on many decades of Thanksgivings in the Philadelphia/South Jersey area (including traveling back and forth between them, since I have parents in both places), I know over the range of all of Thanksgiving weekend, there are lots of times when traffic isn't a big deal at all.


The c-section rate listed confuses me. I asked my relative who works in maternity there to look at this and that person is not in agreement with the percentage. They can be very cut happy. Even so, just a percentage is not something to go by. Even if their c-section rate is low, will you still be able to have the birth experience you want? While their rate may be low, their overall attitude regarding natural and normal births is piss poor. I hate to harp on Hahnemann because there are things I like about the hospital, but their attitude towards birth is not one of them. I've been referred to as crazy and uniformed by their maternity staff for my own birth choices. They are not friendly about homebirths. At 36 weeks they will likely give you a very hard time about a vaginal birth, let alone anything natural.Their NICU is great if you need it, but they can be slightly unfriendly about breastfeeding, depending on who is on staff that day. My relative says Thanksgiving can be unbelievably hectic and you may be subjected to people who just want to get things done and over with as quick as possible. I know it seems I'm harping, but I don't want to see you have a less-than-ideal experience. Hopefully, you won't need it at all.


Jenn treehugger.gifmama to Monkeylearning.gifSquishyenergy.gif& Riverangel1.gif(8wks)Wife to Mikejog.gif See you at the rainbow1284.gif Bridge, Abigael cat.gifand McKenna dog2.gifgd.gifnamaste.giffamilybed2.gifbellyhair.gifcaffix.gifcrochetsmilie.gifom.gifknit.gifcomputergeek2.gif

MrsMike is offline  
#30 of 30 Old 11-03-2011, 08:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
indigosky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
No problem -- I'm not arguing in favor of Hahnemann, either, just explaining why it's on my list at all.

If I eliminate it, that still leaves Cooper, Einstein, & Our Lady of Lourdes. Not sure how to narrow it down further than that...
indigosky is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off