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#91 of 108 Old 12-31-2009, 05:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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ktd, we have an advisor who is involved in that association and she is an invaluable resource in terms of navigating the diagnosis process. It's still confusing though.

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#92 of 108 Old 12-31-2009, 09:32 PM
 
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Part of my Xmas Amazon order included the set of 3 SPD books (The Out of Sync Child, The Out of Sync Child Has Fun, and Sensational Kids). I've read through all of them now and am pretty sure that Sasha does not have SPD, at least not at a clinical level.

He certainly has many of the sensitivities on the checklists, but they don't interfere with his quality of life. For example, he is quite sensitive to the noise of flushing toilets and dislikes public bathrooms for that reason, but he'll go into one if need be without any fight or effort on my part. I just let him leave the stall before flushing (automatic flushers are an issue but if we know about them we can handle them). He also hates brushing and flossing but will tolerate it, so it does get done. The book kept stressing that SPD is when these sensitivities affect a child's quality of life, and make impossible certain things that must be done. Of all the sensitivities (from not liking socks to enjoying big bear hugs) none of them pose a problem for our family life as illustrated in the books.

I can't seem to find a clear connection between his physical aggression issues and sensitivities. He's not the sort who crashes into people and steps on toes b/c he is sensory seeking and moving all over the place. It's more deliberate than that. I'm not sure I'll ever be able to answer why he does it, but I don't think SPD is going to give me the answer in this regard.

It has been helpful to research SPD as a way of seeing further into my children's minds (I think Emily's extreme picky eating is likely due to hypersensitivities that I myself experienced as a child). But I feel at this point therapy is not necessary, at least not the sort directed towards SPD. We're working with his LC on assessing his fine motor skills (now that I'm actually paying attention they don't seem as bad as I thought) to see if a clinical assessment is warrented. Meanwhile we'll keep plodding along!

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#93 of 108 Old 12-31-2009, 09:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Piglet, good to hear that you're getting more clarity. I guess I have some comments/questions that I want to put out there. I don't have an opinion about the specifics of your situation and I believe you know best -- you're a great mom.

One comment is that the OT report picked up on a lot of things that I hadn't recognized as particular issues for ds.

And my question would be regarding accommodations. Would you say that you are accommodating a lot of issues for your ds by modulating his environment and activities? If you organize a child's life so that they never have to deal with situations/experiences that are an issue for them (that would be no problem for most children), I would consider that an accommodation and definitely in the category of "life affecting".

That's something I think about a lot. I think that my ds does really well in a lot of ways compared to how it could be -- but he would not do well if we didn't accommodate his issues by altering his environment and creating situations where he can be successful. People have not recommended that we put him in public school for example. That's a pretty big accommodation that I consider "life affecting" -- as in our case we are not just home educating because we think it's the "best way".

As homeschoolers we have the benefit of creating a situation that works for our kids and for many kids they thrive and develop beautifully without imposed expectations of age-appropriateness. But a small number of homeschooled kids probably don't get interventions that may be helpful to them for the same reason. That's my thinking on it this week any way, so don't take it too seriously.

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#94 of 108 Old 01-01-2010, 05:07 PM
 
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Interesting...

One thing I've come to realize with my Emily is that she didn't seem to have any major problems until she hit puberty. I mean, she was always... spirited. And I may have accommodated some things because I'm sensitive to them too (clothing issues, etc.) But as she approached menarche, that's when all the weird pain issues started. (Yes, at age 10). And if it's SPD, why wasn't it an issue when she was younger? Does that happen sometimes? Or is this a sign that it's not SPD, but rather, something else?

Well, at least testing for SPD doesn't involve needles!

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#95 of 108 Old 01-01-2010, 06:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ksenia View Post
And my question would be regarding accommodations. Would you say that you are accommodating a lot of issues for your ds by modulating his environment and activities?
Yes, the book talked about this a bit too as I recall. When I think about it, I can't think of what we've done to remove him from these experiences. For example, he will let out a yelp and put his hands over his ears if he's in a public stall when the toilet flushes. But it's not like he has a fit, or refuses to go back into a public bathroom. And there's these new-fangled hand dryer thingies in Science World...they are really loud and he does NOT like them, but if he needs to use the bathroom he won't hesitate to go in.

He still has to brush teeth every night, and other than the fact he reminds us how much he hates it, it gets done and we rarely have tears over it. He doesn't like to wear socks (or clothes at all, really!) but he never argues about putting them on to go outside, or does he complain when he's not allowed to strip naked at other peoples' houses.

The aggression thing, of course, is a much bigger issue and we do make accommodations for that to a certain extent, but I'm just not sure that SPD addresses the cause of this behaviour.

Another thing the book said is that "normal" kids may not like a certain stimulus, but will adapt to it after repeated exposure. SPD kids don't adapt in the same way. It seems that DS is able to adapt to his sensitivities - the tooth brushing thing being one example (it took a long time to get to where we could brush, but we got there).

Quote:
...But a small number of homeschooled kids probably don't get interventions that may be helpful to them for the same reason.
It's very true. Like Sasha not wanting to do any drawing/colouring. We've never pushed it and only now I've been thinking perhaps he has a problem. In school this may have been brought to our attention sooner (though he was in preschool last year and it wasn't). But now I'm actively inviting him to come draw/colour with me (those Doodle and Scribble books have been awesome for that!) and seeing just how "bad" the situation is (not as bad as I thought, turns out).

I think the solution is to be on the lookout for areas in which the child is struggling (and wanting to do better) or areas where we are accommodating them to the point of not allowing them to progress.

The best part of all this learning about SPD is that it has motivated me to examine DS's daily life more closely and look for signs that he is struggling in some area.

I do appreciate the questions, it helps me think things out!

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#96 of 108 Old 01-01-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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...But as she approached menarche, that's when all the weird pain issues started. (Yes, at age 10). And if it's SPD, why wasn't it an issue when she was younger?
That is a very interesting fact about her "case". Immediately brings to mind the issue of hormones, and perhaps them being out of balance in some way?

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#97 of 108 Old 01-08-2010, 06:08 AM
 
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It occurred to me recently that maybe the reason she's not interested in boys (and I know she's not interested in girls either b/c I've asked) is because she doesn't want to be touched. Thinking about the ramifications of that blows me away. This is not some trivial little thing. And how will she be able to have regular employment as an adult if she has to call in sick all the time for things that would be trivial in normal people, and she looks perfectly healthy? She'll be fired from everywhere! Which will be very demoralizing and just worsen the cycle. Urg.
Lori, I am just lurking here as my dd does not have signs of sensory issues. However, I had to respond to this one. I am not a "touch" person and have not been for a while, likely from about age 10 as well. As in, I would not let my mother hug me because I found it physically irritating. I still have those issues but have managed to work through them in a few specific cases, dd being the most prominent, since I ended up with a child who demanded (and still demands) rather constant physical contact. So there's hope. Not that Emily will be a huggy person, but that she might be able to work this through for a few important people.

Also, web-based work is a wonderful thing for those of us who communicate best through text. I love doing online writing, for example.

Not to negate your concerns, but just saying...there are ways to become a functioning adult with these issues, but you do need to be creative about it.

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#98 of 108 Old 01-08-2010, 08:22 AM
 
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I've been noticing so many things lately that D does that are so obviously sensory issues, but none of them are life-altering in and of themselves. He does a lot of things, though, that are incredibly annoying/messy/etc, and that does turn out to be life-altering, when we harp on him (however nicely) about not stepping on everything, not eating at the table with his knees up to his chest, not biting his fork loudly with each bite, not eating his bacon all wadded up in his fist, not grabbing my boobs every chance he gets ("but mommy, they're so soft and thick!" ) et cetera.... all this harping (and while we let a lot of it go, I do feel it is our responsibility to help him refine his "manners" so to speak) wears on him, and he tells us we insult him too much. he's incredibly sensitive, so we do just nicely remind him -- put your legs all the way down, use your lips not your teeth, just use your pincher fingers for your bacon, here's your napkin... the list goes on and on at mealtime, but they really are just nice, friendly reminders because we know why he's doing these things, and it appears he can't really help but eat this way. I suspect he will grow out of a lot of these things (surely he won't tuck his knees under his chin on dates, will he? ) but the constant reminding doesn't seem to be working, and if there is some therapy that will address ALL of the various sensory issues, maybe a lot of the problematic behaviors will go away...

when he was younger I felt everything was just part of being little, but now I know he's dealing with sensory issues, and I wish we had known this earlier... his issues aren't all table-manners related, those are just the ones at the forefront lately because we've been eating at the table more lately, with guests

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#99 of 108 Old 01-08-2010, 10:34 PM
 
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This Just In!

I was talking to Karen, the director of Oscar's school today - she is talking withBrock and Fernette Eides (the athors of The Mislabelled Child, and in the forefront of GLD education) about a possible workshop in Vancouver!!!!
I'll keep you posted!
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#100 of 108 Old 01-09-2010, 12:33 AM - Thread Starter
 
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eating at the table with his knees up to his chest, not biting his fork loudly with each bite, not eating his bacon all wadded up in his fist
Omigosh, I was *just* giving a little manners talk on these things . I really hope we can do therapy...ASAP. Posture was an issue mentioned for ds -- low muscle tone even though he has lots of energy.
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I was talking to Karen, the director of Oscar's school today - she is talking withBrock and Fernette Eides (the athors of The Mislabelled Child, and in the forefront of GLD education) about a possible workshop in Vancouver!!!!
I'll keep you posted!
That's fantastic

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#101 of 108 Old 01-09-2010, 02:52 AM
 
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Posture was an issue mentioned for ds -- low muscle tone even though he has lots of energy.That's fantastic
yes, it's amazing how a child who is so strong and has such amazing balance *at times* can also be so incredibly clumsy and floppy and bull-in-a-china-shop at other times...

and also hope you're feeling better soon ksenia, pneumonia can't be helping...

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#102 of 108 Old 01-16-2010, 02:23 AM
 
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Was reading about oral habits today and came across this site, thought it might be helpful for people in this thread http://pacificpediatricsupply.com
They have products for kids with sensory processing and sensory integration issues.

Mom to Kayleigh (05/07) Jacob (05/09) and Ned decluttering 615/2010
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#103 of 108 Old 01-16-2010, 02:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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ktd, here's a brochure:
Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder in Children and Adolescents
A Guide for Healthcare Providers

A great read!

We just got the results of ds' sleep study. No sleep apnea, but he is a "light sleeper, with frequent spontaneous arousals and perhaps some PLMs [paroxysmal limb movements]". There. Proof of what I could have told you when ds was a week old. The PLM thing seems to indicate a possibility of Restless Legs Syndrome if I am interpreting correctly.

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#104 of 108 Old 01-17-2010, 04:43 AM
 
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fantastic, I think our first order of business is going to be iron supplements for myself and DD. I've had low iron most of my adult life and we don't eat a lot (barely any) red meat or other foods rich in iron.

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#105 of 108 Old 01-17-2010, 03:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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kdt, there are a lot of factors that affect iron absorption. Calcium-rich foods inhibit iron absorption and vitamin-c containing foods facilitate iron absorption. There are various underlying causes to low iron including lead toxicity, etc. (hope none are the case for you and your little one). I don't think that there's a strong relationship between eating red meat and iron status -- my mom had her worst anemia crisis while she was regularly eating red meat. I wouldn't supplement without a low or low-normal ferritin test result as iron can damage organs if it accumulates in them. Having said that, Floradix is a great iron supplement and we used it when ds had very low ferritin.

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#106 of 108 Old 01-17-2010, 04:20 PM
 
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The last time I was anemic was when I was on a strict budget and could not afford meat, I was otherwise very healthy. Eating more red meat (helpfully supplied by my parents) DID bring my iron back up. I was run through a myriad of tests to rule out any other possibilities, including heavy metal testing because I had been working on some research for electroplating metals (Nickel, Cobalt, Zinc) and working daily with lead compounds. bleh, so glad I'm not there any more!

At any rate, if you look at my DD's diet... there aren't many sources of iron. She eats cereal rather sporadically (dairy allergy), pasta occassionally (both are fortified) but mainly prefers to eat rice. And for fruits and veggies, nothing she will eat consistently has any appreciable amount of iron in it (red peppers, tomatoes, blueberries, oranges, mushrooms, etc),

And of course, back to the real problem, she refuses to eat foods high in iron - potatoes, egg yolks, broccoli, spinach, etc. And has even been "off" her beans for the last 6 months or so. I used to be able to get her to at least eat beans! She asked for beans for lunch today, so maybe we'll get back to that. With all the travelling we've been doing in the last 6 months it's been really hard to get decent food into her. Relatives cook what they cook and if she doesn't eat it then too bad and restaurant food is just bleh.

I have to head back to the doc shortly anyways, maybe I'll at the very least have MY iron tested (I hate to put my kid through that) and see where that stands, as MY RLS has been worse lately. Do you happen to know if they'll do a finger prick iron test here in Canada? I know they do in the US and I think it would be less traumatic than having blood taken.

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#107 of 108 Old 01-17-2010, 06:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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kdt, we had blood drawn at the Children's Hospital (you can take the lab requisition form there) and it was incredible how much better they were at doing it with children! It was so much less traumatic for me and for ds. I'm not aware of finger prick being an option, and not convinced that it would less painful or traumatic.

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#108 of 108 Old 01-18-2010, 06:19 AM
 
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We had DD's blood drawn at Children's last Thursday and they were good with her- it was so much harder on me then anything. She did cry but nothing three mini marshmallows and mama love couldn't fix. We were getting her iron tested too, as well as other stuff to make sure her weight and growth is normal for her. To think of it though, when Dh donates blood they test his iron with a finger prick but that of course (I think) just tell them if it's above a certain amount to safely donate, not iron stores or anything. Don't know if a doc can do that? Im sure the naturopath we have seen could do a non invasive test if your interested.

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