Viewing Review: A good pregnancy book for moms with disabilties - Mothering Forums

A good pregnancy book for moms with disabilties Edit
by briannas auntie Combined Rating: 4.0

I bought "The Disabled Woman's Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth" on Amazon.com in the used book section.  I was trying to find a book for people with disabilities who have been pregnant.  My...
Pros Cons
  • written just for disabled women, orgqanized well, many references
  • didn't talk much about breastfeeding, no section on ostomies

I bought "The Disabled Woman's Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth" on Amazon.com in the used book section.  I was trying to find a book for people with disabilities who have been pregnant.  My gyno suggested this book to me and said that there was lots of useful information in it.  It was a great price, so I had to buy it.

 

This book is written by Judith Rogers, a woman who help start Through The Looking Glass, an organization for disabled parents.  The book's first section is about different disabilities and women who have them that are mentioned in the book.  For example, a lady name Carolynn has cerebral palsy and talks about how her pregnancy was and how it made her spasticity better.  The next section talks about pregnancy and how it can be different for women with disabilities.  For example, someone with multiple sclerosis might have fewer symptoms, whereas someone with muscular dystrophy might have more symptoms while pregnant, such as spasticity and pain.  The book explains how some common pregnancy symptoms, such as morning sickness and fatigue, are the same for disabled women as they are for normal women.  Being disabled doesn't cause these symptoms to be worse. This section also talked about infections and how some women with disabilities are at higher risk for them, including women with spinal cord injuries and spina bifida (bladder infections are common for these women).

The next section talks about labor and birth.  This section I was very interested in, but found it very basic.  It talks about what happens during labor, pain relief options, and delivering in a hospital.  I honestly didn't see any mention of birthing at home or in a birth center.  It did talk about C-Sections and that disabled women DO NOT have a higher rate of them, so that was positive to read. 

There was a small section on breastfeeding and bottle feeding, and I didn't care for this section, because there was little talk about breastfeeding, except for adaptive devices that can help with breastfeeding a newborn while sitting in a wheelchair. 

The final section was about adaptive help for parenting a baby while disabled.  I especially liked that they had different tips on changing a baby, extreme fatigue with a newborn, and even adaptive devices.  They had a picture of a crib that had been adapted for a wheelchair user, as well as pictures of babies in slings.   

The reference section had the website and address for Through The Looking Glass as well as information on their book that teaches you how to make adaptive baby equipment. 

 

Though the book was very well organized and included lots of stories of moms who are disabled, I felt it lacked on the breastfeeding section and didn't include labor/birth alternatives. There was also no information on being pregnant and having an ostomy, which I was really looking for.  If this doesn't matter to you, then its a great book.

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