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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-01-2013 08:46 PM
nenegoose

I have no idea if DD who is almost 3 is going to hit the magic 130 to be officially considered gifted in many districts but she is quite out there as far as cognitive and academic aptitudes go. In her areas of strength, she is functioning closer to 6 to 8 years old. 

 

As a baby, she hit milestones either early or on time. Doctors and nurses made a huge fuss over DD after birth but I thought they were just trying to be reassuring. When she could stay focused on books for as long as we were willing to read to her at 2 months, we didn't know that was unusual. We just wanted her to go to sleep instead. 

 

So in retrospect, there were many signs from day one but we were completely oblivious and we are glad that we were. We were already anxious enough being first time parents so we probably would have cracked under the added pressure of parenting a "gifted" child properly. 

06-01-2013 05:55 PM
CyndyRR327

My gifted ds was just a normal baby.  Honestly I don't remember anything "outstanding" that he did early.  He met all of the milestones on time, was a bit late in walking (walked at 13 months).  My non-gifted ds was the one who seemed to do everything early, sitting, walking (9mos), etc.  But he's also the athlete in the family, I think he just couldn't wait to MOVE haha.

 

From my experience I can see why they put age limits on making decisions if a child is gifted or not.  Oh, and my gifted ds' IQ is in the 130's.

05-30-2013 10:57 PM
sereneimago

My son who is 8 months has been extremely alert since birth... other than a brief colicky period, which we figured out stemmed from dairy sensitivity (which I eliminated from my diet til he was 6 months), he has been an extremely energetic, bright-eyed, curious, intrepid, happy baby.  At four months he could listen to me play an entire Beethoven Sonata movement on my cello, without his attention being broken at all.  He also amazed us and shocked us a little by speaking very early-- he said "na" for nursing starting at 3 months and "mama" since about 4 months.  He said "wa" for walk a few times before apparently forgetting it, but has also said his sister's nickname "noona" perfectly clearly a number of times in reference to her.  He grunts "uh" with a head nod for "yeah", and makes an "eh-eh" sound for no.  He said "no" perfectly clearly a couple of times but has regressed a little with language since he started moving about on grand crawling adventures!

He also does a few signs... he has surprised me by doing the sign for milk quite frequently while nursing... and has done so while holding a bottle as well.  He responds to us signing all done or more or will respond when we ask him which book he will like to read (reaching for it and picking it up).

This week he amazed us because started playing a game we used to play with his sister while reading "Goodnight Moon"- "where is the kitten?" but instead of pointing to the picture of the kittens playing, he pointed to the word "kitten".  He did this with two more words...with "mouse" and "bear".

 

His sister tested as profoundly gifted (she is 14 now) and as a baby was also extremely alert- she was wide eyed and calm from birth, starting standing at 3 weeks (with support), did everything a little early, and spoke in full sentances her first year.  She started memorizing books from cover to cover when she was 2 which made me think she might be reading but it was an oral memory.  She did waldorf preschool and kindergarten so didn't read until 1st grade but then she quickly skipped many levels within a few months.  By age 13 she tested for the CTY talent search and recieved "high honors", and was awarded a full scholarship to attend University this summer.  The main thing I remember her doing as a baby was being extremely reasonable and alert.  She understood what everyone said but amazingly used telepathy with me to tell me what she needed, so she very seldom cried.  The only time she was difficult was when she had food allergies and after her father took her to be immunized against my permission, she was catatonic for a week (back when the vaccines still had thimerosal in them.)

 

I did mostly homeschooling/unschooling with her but wish there was a gifted program she could have attended.  I was a low income single mother for much of her raising so I feel like she didn't get enough educational opportunities, except for music, art, and love of reading from her home environment.

 

I don't think it's much fun to compare special children to other more average children... even if your child is advanced you'll end up feeling embarassed, or their symptoms end up being so different, that it's hard for other parents to relate to you, and can be alienating.  I stopped sharing my son's accomplishments with most people I know because I don't know how to share the amazingness of it without seeming like I'm bragging.

 

I would like to find more support from other moms about how they dealt with their children's giftedness-- I'm thankful for this thread.
 

11-06-2012 05:20 AM
GrannyH

A long time ago (!) I had a gifted baby. I didn't know I did for thirteen months. She was born a few weeks early and was jaundiced and sleepy for the first six weeks. She then perked up and did well. On reflection she did enjoy shape sorters and puzzles early and was very alert  generally . I did nothing special but I was a very happy new mum.

 

At 12 months she had about 12 words and could walk well. Completely normal. At thirteen months I was surprised to discover that an 8 year old neighbour had taught her all her letters with words attached in one afternoon! I discouraged it as I thought she would be confused between letters and words. But she went into overdrive after that! By two she was making up long stories and reading the Mr Men books without having to sound out anything.

 

When she started kindy at three she was called "The Professor". She won many scholarships and prizes throughout school. At medical school many years later she was called "scary smart" . Her IQ is well over 160. She is now a very bright doctor with 2 separate first class honour degrees and a university medal. She is a happy, fulfilled adult with lots of friends and a baby of her own. She enjoys her work, continues to study, to  learn things just for fun and to enjoy passing passions in recreational activities. 

 

I was a teacher for many years and have seen some terrible attempts to pressurise gifted children and many who were not really gifted and must have had a hard time indeed living up to their parents' expectations. Here is my advice:

 

. Talk to your children, read to them even when they can read themselves, play with them , have fun together as a family in whatever ways you enjoy.

 

. Allow your children to enjoy all stages of being a child without pressure. If they are truly gifted they will seek out ways to learn through books and real life experiences without being coached or pushed.  Going to university at 12 with parents in tow is theft of childhood and risks their overall development, maturity, independence  and balance.

 

. Allow them lots of spare time and space to think up things to do on their own or with friends. You may be surprised what they think up. Fortunately, gifted children do not need to study for too long! Leaving plenty of time for mischief!

 

. Hobbies and pastimes are very important too. Music is especially good for gifted children as it requires effort no matter how gifted they are. Also something that involves helping others .

  

. Encourage them to spend time with friends. It will help them stay sane if they stay connected to other people and, as they become older, networking is very important and will provide opportunities. Being able to get on with all kinds of people is very important. So is empathy!

 

. Encourage travel and independence. My daughter went off to Europe on her own with a youth orchestra at nine and had a great time. Every time she went away she returned more mature and more confident.

 

. Enjoy your children for who they are , not as possessions you can boast about.

 

. Most important of all, remember that you cannot live vicariously through them. They own their own lives.  

06-05-2012 09:19 PM
DeeplyRooted

DS5 was an unusually alert baby, too.  (Seems like almost everyone is saying that!  I wonder if it's a more common characteristic of gifted children, or if the broader MDC population would say their babies were "alert" in the same proportion.)

 

One thing I remember was taking an infant class at Isis Maternity, when DS was a few weeks old.  The other few-week-old babies mostly lay down passively, cooing, staring, sleeping, and generally being content.  But not my kid.  No, he wanted to sit up and look at everyone!  He paid attention the whole time, making eye contact with other class participants and tracking all that was going on.

 

His attention span continued to impress us throughout his babyhood.  I recall him holding a small toy -- a torus with a tiny ball inside it -- and gently tipping it back and forth, back and forth, back and forth for ages, watching that little ball on the inside roll around.  Later, as he developed fine motor control, he would experiment with rolling ring-shaped or disk-shaped items on the floor to see them roll and wobble.  (In fact, it became kind of an obsession, which led us to have him evaluated for autism spectrum disorder.)  Today, his attention and focus manifests itself when he builds with train sets or Legos. wink1.gif

 

He walked a little bit late, and he talked quite late.  And he never really picked up baby signs, nor did he ever use his hands to wave at people or point to anything (again, ASD indications).  No other delays to speak of, though.  Sleep?  No, he never did much of that!  He was wakeful and hard to put down for months and months.  Then, finally, he got the idea that sleep was his friend, and it suddenly became much easier for him to just lie down happily and fall asleep within minutes.  Cosleeping helped a lot.  (Not that we would have done it, but we are 100% convinced that crying it out would never have worked for DS -- too stubborn and easily wound up!)

 

 

He was, and still is, extremely volatile emotionally.  When things go wrong for him, they quickly go Really Really Wrong, and his extreme upset is hard for him and for us to handle.  It's getting better now that he's 5, though; 4 was kind of awful...  The flip side, however, is that he has an enormous capacity for delight!  His smile is brilliant, and his laugh is utterly contagious.  Many things in life bring him joy, including his remarkable abilities to read, manipulate numbers, identify plants and clouds and such, remember obscurities, and master knowledge quickly. 

06-04-2012 11:26 AM
Cgilber5

So interesting to read your posts!  My daughter also has sensory processing disorder and is gifted. She was a VERY difficult baby!  She seemed to need zero sleep, cried constantly for months, and could only be somewhat calmed by a dark room with water running (white noise).  I always assumed she'd grow out of her colicky stage, but she didn't really.  She hated the grass, being on her stomach, being wet, having water on her face, tags, shoes.  I could go on forever. She is very emotionally reactive and always has been. She always cried at family gatherings and we'd always leave early.  She wasn't a baby friends and family enjoyed visiting.  She was very alert and observant.  She was also very serious and didn't laugh much.  She had a great attention span, loved books, loved sorting very young, had an impressive vocabulary and new over 200 signs by age 2.  She had an intense desire to learn.  At her 2 year check-up at a University hospital, the doctor went and got other doctors to "come see this 2 year old who acts and talks like she's five!

 

She is almost 8 now. She is lovable, creative, artistic, and has a HUGE heart.  She is very empathetic, but has major meltdowns over things that seem insignificant to others.  She starts the gifted program in the fall and I'm wondering if she'll meet some kids with similar issues. 

 

I have to mention that a Gluten Free diet has helped her.  She is still emotional, but doesn't have the dark feelings she was having before we started.  She is enjoying things that she didn't before (birthday parties, small rides, festivals).  Before she could only focus on the negatives after these events.

08-01-2011 05:04 AM
Rainbow2911

My ds1 was totally different as a baby. He slept a ridiculous amount of time (we barely saw him awake the first 6 months!) and was very behind physically. I found his baby book the other day and at 8 mo he wasn't sitting unassisted or rolling over. He was however very happy looking at books and stacking bricks (went ape if they fell over though). He didn't crawl until nearly a year old and wasn't talking until he was 2.5. He could recognise all the letters and numbers before he was a year old (hard to say when he was reading words as he wasn't vocal but we were certainly aware that he recognised what quite a few words meant by 18 months). He is very gifted (and on the spectum).

 On the other hand my dd was physically precocious - very like your baby. She was insanely alert and aware and never slept. She is bright but I wouldn't say unusually so.

 

Kids all do things differently bless them! I think they just like to keep us guessing....

 

07-25-2011 02:50 PM
MomofSev

First of all, she is ADORABLE!

 I am very impressed with her ability to sit up so well at such a young age. Although, I only have one child to compare it to so take that for what it's worth. I would say the pedi has a pretty good comparison meter, though.

 

My son was very alert as soon as we brought him home from the hospital. He was able to track things with his eyes that very first day. I remember how surprised my husband and I were, not that we have any real experience with babies besides our son. He learned sign language at 4 months, though (the "eat" sign.. it's pretty important haha!) He didn't sit up unassisted for long periods of time until closer to 6 months, like most babies I believe. He started crawling around 7 months and walked just before he turned 10 months old. Like everything in life, once he was ready to do it.. he just went for it. :)

 

Here is a video I took 8 days before he was 4 months old signing "eat". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHCk-4Bjdtk

This surprised us, but we went with it and kept teaching him signs as soon as we could.

07-06-2011 08:26 AM
BennyPai

Of course it's difficult to tell so early, but it is great to be in tune with your little one's personality and interests.  I have always followed my dd's lead.

 

My older, gifted dd was in the normal range with her infant milestones, including sitting up and eventually walking.  She was an alert baby, though, and had a marked interest in books.  A friend of mine gifted her Where the Wild Things Are when she was almost 4 months old because dd was smiling, cooing, reaching for the pictures and generally showing so much interest. 

 

As someone else mentioned, it is really interesting to reflect back on her life so far and see how her personality was forming so early.  She still loves books!   As a first grader she excelled in all subjects, but reading especially.  She started first grade reading at fourth grade level and was reading at the eighth grade level by June.  (So glad her school is flexible with students being at different levels:  so far she hasn't been singled out at all.) 

 

My second dd was ahead of most others her age with the infant milestones.  She was walking (and climbing-Eek!) by nine months.  She didn't have the patience to sit through an entire book until she was three years old.  As a second child, though, people say they are in a bigger hurry to "keep up with big sister/brother."  So far, she has impressed her Montessori teacher with her 3-D puzzle skills and frustrated her public school Kindergarten teacher with her behavior... Just like with dd1, I am following dd2's lead.  Is she gifted?  Time will tell, but meanwhile I am just focusing on meeting her needs.

06-27-2011 06:41 PM
MelissaBarnes

Have you thought about having him tested for Sensory Processing Disorder? They have some really good techniques to help kids deal with that.

Melissa

06-26-2011 10:22 AM
Moon Faerie

My ds is extremely gifted. He's also an aspie and has motor delays. As a baby, his gross motor skills were always on the back end of normal. He didn't start crawling until 10 months, walking until around 17 months. He was a late talker (which he has since made up for, lol). He didn't fully potty train until almost 5. Now, at almost 8, he still struggles with many fine motor skills things. He can't button, snap, or zip. He struggles with scissors. Etc. 

 

My dd was always very far ahead on meeting milestones. She was running at 10 months. She talked in full sentences really early. (I remember going trick or treating when she was 2.5, and she told us. "This hill is just too steep.") Etc. She's not gifted though. Academically speaking, she's merely an advanced student. She's quite the athlete though. winky.gif

06-20-2011 09:07 PM
Casha'sMommy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calliope84 View Post




 

Avalon is so happy now, too! She will be 7 months in 9 days and she is crawling all over the place, pulling up on everything, opening drawers, dumping out any basket she sees, etc. But she is actually happy now. She started giving us belly laughs finally. She was really serious and didn't make much noise before... she only just started babbling (mama, dada ada,ohgo etc a week or so ago. I was wondering about that because I think the baby books say they do it between 4-6 months.)



It is my belief that, as babies, gifted children do not follow milestones like babbling as typical children tend to. I think those that are gifted are far too busy expoloring, experiencing, observing, etc differenet things and situations that they're too busy for babbling. (I believe the same holds true for crawling, walking, etc.) I think that once they get past a certain point they can let all that language out but not before they've figured some stuff out.

16yo dd never really babbled, she had individual words which she used regularly but never put them together much to make phrases or sentences. She didn't really talk much before 2yo but once she started she never stopped and still hasn't to this day. lol

06-20-2011 07:53 PM
Calliope84

Quote:
Originally Posted by CA Mom View Post

My son was a train wreck and as soon as he could move so was our house. He was a very unhappy baby until he could move. He started crawling at 7 months out of frustration to get to everything he wanted to explore. He had a ton of SI issues too. He s out growing them now. It's funny I never saw him as gifted that young. I can see it now, but back then he was just a very busy very difficult baby. I always thought my oldest was going to have the abilities because she learned her letters early, could memorize whole books by 2 and I couldn't even get my son to look at a book until 3. Now my oldest struggles in language arts and my son reads 3 grade levels above his own.


 

Avalon is so happy now, too! She will be 7 months in 9 days and she is crawling all over the place, pulling up on everything, opening drawers, dumping out any basket she sees, etc. But she is actually happy now. She started giving us belly laughs finally. She was really serious and didn't make much noise before... she only just started babbling (mama, dada ada,ohgo etc a week or so ago. I was wondering about that because I think the baby books say they do it between 4-6 months.)

06-20-2011 06:46 PM
loraxc My son was also born with his eyes open! He was a waterbirth and I guess the midwife could see him looking around before his body was born. She went on and on about this, so I guess it's unusual?
05-24-2011 07:11 PM
emmaegbert

funny, DD was literally born with her eyes open too- apparently she looked around at the midwives and the room when just her head was out (she was born with just  3 pushes, so this was in between numbers 2 and 3). She was a very calm baby though compared to her older brother who was born "floppy" (briefly non-responsive probably due to shoulder dystocia). DD has just turned 2 and I think jury's out on her learning style and cognitive strengths, but her temperament is still very calm and easygoing.

05-17-2011 08:00 PM
Casha'sMommy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco Infiltrator View Post

my son was born with his eyes wide open. I remember sitting in a parenting support group where the leader said that babies will "wake up" and you won't see their eyes for a while because they're closed and I was really, really confused because DS was always eyes-wide-open. We were so delirious with sleep deprivation after he was born and I remember us joking that he was keeping his eyes open in case some predatory baby came and stole his milk.


Us too! DS was literally born looking dh in the eyes. When ds restituted his eyes were wide open and looking around the room, says dh.

From the minute ds was born we were on our toes but that pretty much describes all of my children with the exception of the dd who was born profoundly deaf. We've pretty much come to the conclusion that she was much more calm because she didn't how much was going on around her and now that she has cochlear implants she's off the charts wild.

05-17-2011 10:03 AM
CA Mom My son was a train wreck and as soon as he could move so was our house. He was a very unhappy baby until he could move. He started crawling at 7 months out of frustration to get to everything he wanted to explore. He had a ton of SI issues too. He s out growing them now. It's funny I never saw him as gifted that young. I can see it now, but back then he was just a very busy very difficult baby. I always thought my oldest was going to have the abilities because she learned her letters early, could memorize whole books by 2 and I couldn't even get my son to look at a book until 3. Now my oldest struggles in language arts and my son reads 3 grade levels above his own.
05-17-2011 06:25 AM
crunchy_mommy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco Infiltrator View Post

my son was born with his eyes wide open. I remember sitting in a parenting support group where the leader said that babies will "wake up" and you won't see their eyes for a while because they're closed and I was really, really confused because DS was always eyes-wide-open. We were so delirious with sleep deprivation after he was born and I remember us joking that he was keeping his eyes open in case some predatory baby came and stole his milk.

This was DS too!! Very very alert. I remember when we left the hospital they handed us some paper about babies sleeping 18+ hours a day at first. WHAT?!?! I don't think he slept 18 hours TOTAL over the 3 days we were there!!
05-17-2011 06:16 AM
Disco Infiltrator my son was born with his eyes wide open. I remember sitting in a parenting support group where the leader said that babies will "wake up" and you won't see their eyes for a while because they're closed and I was really, really confused because DS was always eyes-wide-open. We were so delirious with sleep deprivation after he was born and I remember us joking that he was keeping his eyes open in case some predatory baby came and stole his milk. He was one hundred miles an hour from the beginning - doing supported standing from very early on, earlier than three months, started crawling at 5.5 months. Cross crawling at 7 months and cruising, as well as being able to get down from standing all at the same time. Now he's four and whip-smart. The kid has a memory that will not stop and can remember things from years ago and will verbally negotiate pretty much almost any situation. He's a boy so his verbalization is pretty normal but his vocabulary amazes me. Now we have a much more average baby as a second and it's helping me realize how different DS was. Very intense kid.

We are unschooling DS and DD and I have no desire to even mentally label DS as gifted, although I suspect he could be. Like I said, he's at least whip-smart. I don't want my expectations to get in the way of him being a kid and I firmly believe that he will meet his own needs through his natural curiosity and passion for learning, all I have to do is follow his lead and provide a rich and supportive environment. So there's just no need to KNOW based on that.

I've heard that you can't truly test a child for being gifted until older.

Lastly, I've found that DS will do things that interest him and if he's not interested, he won't do them. We don't push any rote memorization in our home, he doesn't spout off his numbers or alphabet, both big benchmarks for parents around us. I've noticed that he does know his numbers and letters, can even do some simple math, but push him on these things and he shuts down. He's not reading "early" but I'm not expecting him or pushing him to read at all. It will come when he's ready, right now he sees no value to it. Instead he runs around doing experiments and building robots out of household objects. I'm trying to get at that there are all kinds of ways to show giftedness besides being ahead on benchmarks - he's been ahead on some and average on others and a little behind on a few, but I don't think any of that takes away from him being a pretty smart kid. And now I will go cuddle him because I'm ignoring him to write this.
05-15-2011 08:08 PM
emmaegbert

oh yeah- kids of all ages are pretty much fascinated by somewhat older kids. but the reverse is not always the case (though some older kids do particularly like little ones). Anyway looking at my old post, it was written unclearly. Babies interact- just not so much *with eachother*. Then when they get older, they start to, though at first often still kind of mediated by adults. And they will interact much more readily and easily with peers who they know well, kids with whom they have a lot of regular contact, etc. At least, that is what I have mostly observed in my own kids and others.

05-11-2011 10:14 AM
Calliope84

Quote:
Originally Posted by emmaegbert View Post

hand thing sounds totally normal.

 

babies really don't interact at that age. really not for a good long while, though they MIGHT interact with an older kid who pays attention to them, or a child who they see very regularly. Our friend's daughter was over today- she is 9mo- my 24mo daughter was engaging her occasionally and they laugh with eachother some. But mostly she is just observing us but focused on the adults (esp her mom, until mom leaves).

 

Don't worry. Like I said in my earlier post and others have said too: She's so young. Enjoy her and don't put too many expectations on yourself or on her. give her opportunities to be around other people- and she will engage with them when she's ready. I was more gung-ho to encourage peer friendships with my first, now with my second, I don't worry as much. Of course- she has her brother around all the time. And we live with extended family too- so more community at home. But only recently has she started being interested in having "friends"... and she just turned 2.

 

 


We are visiting in-laws right now and she LOVES her 3 yr old cousin. She watches him and tries to carry on conversations, but I think he isn't very impressed with what she has to say lol. I am trying to enjoy her. I am a little sad she is crawling now. I miss having her in my arms without being so wiggly!

 

05-10-2011 08:04 PM
emmaegbert

hand thing sounds totally normal.

 

babies really don't interact at that age. really not for a good long while, though they MIGHT interact with an older kid who pays attention to them, or a child who they see very regularly. Our friend's daughter was over today- she is 9mo- my 24mo daughter was engaging her occasionally and they laugh with eachother some. But mostly she is just observing us but focused on the adults (esp her mom, until mom leaves).

 

Don't worry. Like I said in my earlier post and others have said too: She's so young. Enjoy her and don't put too many expectations on yourself or on her. give her opportunities to be around other people- and she will engage with them when she's ready. I was more gung-ho to encourage peer friendships with my first, now with my second, I don't worry as much. Of course- she has her brother around all the time. And we live with extended family too- so more community at home. But only recently has she started being interested in having "friends"... and she just turned 2.

 

 

04-26-2011 01:15 PM
crunchy_mommy OK take this gently but...

I think you are worrying too much.

I also think 5mos old is just very, very young, and a lot could change in the coming weeks & months.

Obviously this is a great place to find out more, vent your worries, etc. but it sort of sounds like you are putting a lot of pressure on her. I don't know many babies that young that socialize/interact with others and I don't think DS mimicked me at all at that age (or if he did, I didn't notice?? It wasn't something I was on the lookout for at all...)

I would really, really try to step back & just enjoy her, enjoy watching her learn and grow... it sounds like she is doing wonderfully.

But, to answer your original question (because I totally get being curious on this, I don't mean to discredit your question at all!)...

I have no clue if DS is gifted -- he's only 27mos old. He does a lot of things that a lot of people and his pedi have told me seem "advanced" but I also suspect he has some kind of sensory issues or something. But, at 4-5mos he was pulling to standing on nearby objects. He was definitely able to sit unassisted before that point, but had almost no interest in doing so. He was a velcro baby -- wanted to be in my arms all the time. He loved loved LOVED books and listened incredibly intently to pretty long stories (i.e. Dr. Seuss)... that interest in books has continued and his favorite thing ever is reading. He was taking steps by 7mos but never crawled and didn't walk much until he was around a year old (to be honest, he still doesn't walk all that much -- he always wants to be carried). I don't remember when he said his first words -- though I do remember around 9mos old he'd say things like "kitty" and "uh-oh drop cup"... He had ~1000 words and was using mostly phrases & sentences by 18mos. He was great at things like puzzles and shape sorters early on, but hasn't sustained much interest in them. He is very mechanical, and the first time he ever saw a screwdriver (around a year old) he just knew how to use it & walked around pretending to unscrew all the screws in the house. He loves things like phones, cameras, LED candles, outlets, etc. He has an interesting way of thinking and relating to people -- it's hard to specify or explain, but he just seems to think differently than other kids. I feel like he gained a lot of milestones quickly & early on, and somewhere around 18mos maybe leveled off a bit.
04-26-2011 09:55 AM
Calliope84

Quote:
Originally Posted by pranava View Post

Staring at their hands while turning them every which way is totally normal and seems like she is at the right age for that.

 

Babies don't really interact with each other.  Most prefer other adults to look at.  Only around a year do most babies start parallel play - they play next to another child, but not with the child.  At 25 months my DS has really just started to fully interact with other kids his age, and some kids his age still don't interact.  It's normal.

 

The mimicing will come with time.  She is studying you, but may not have the physical control to repeat your movement as she sees it.  Also, watching + doing is multi-tasking for a baby!  She will clap and wave at you soon, but it would not be out of the ordinary if she didn't mimic you  with movement until 10 - 12 months.  The fact that she mimics your smile, I think means she is fine. Many babies don't say mama or dada until 12 months.  Just keep talking to her and say the letter sounds M M M and D D D to her often and she will pick them up.



Well, I guess I don't have to worry too much about play dates right now, then. I think this is called asynchronous development. I doubt it would be so noticeable if less happened in the first year of life, but so much does! I guess no baby really goes according to "the book" anyway, though.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjej View Post

Having a new baby is really exciting and intense, but do try to take all your observations with a grain of salt.  I mean, she's 4 months old...  It's a bit of pressure for you to be expecting these things and being worried or disappointed that they aren't happening.

 

For the mimicry, my DD didn't do that much either.  She didn't imitate my speaking either.  But when she ended up with a retired teacher for a week the summer she was 1 she started doing it tons.  I think it's just not how I interacted with her and/or she just wasn't wanting to at that young age yet. 

 

As far as your DD being an observer in large groups - my DD is 5 and she is still like that (to a lesser extent).  You can read about introversion if you want to occupy yourself and learn about that possible aspect to your child's personality.

 

Tjej

 

Very true. Good to know about the mimicry... I am an introvert so I get it. I don't know if we can tell this early, though. If we go out all day she needs to nurse every hour and probably feels a bit overwhelmed, but it probably is just because she is a baby...
 

 

04-26-2011 09:39 AM
Tjej

Having a new baby is really exciting and intense, but do try to take all your observations with a grain of salt.  I mean, she's 4 months old...  It's a bit of pressure for you to be expecting these things and being worried or disappointed that they aren't happening.

 

For the mimicry, my DD didn't do that much either.  She didn't imitate my speaking either.  But when she ended up with a retired teacher for a week the summer she was 1 she started doing it tons.  I think it's just not how I interacted with her and/or she just wasn't wanting to at that young age yet. 

 

As far as your DD being an observer in large groups - my DD is 5 and she is still like that (to a lesser extent).  You can read about introversion if you want to occupy yourself and learn about that possible aspect to your child's personality.

 

Tjej

04-25-2011 07:34 PM
pranava

Staring at their hands while turning them every which way is totally normal and seems like she is at the right age for that.

 

Babies don't really interact with each other.  Most prefer other adults to look at.  Only around a year do most babies start parallel play - they play next to another child, but not with the child.  At 25 months my DS has really just started to fully interact with other kids his age, and some kids his age still don't interact.  It's normal.

 

The mimicing will come with time.  She is studying you, but may not have the physical control to repeat your movement as she sees it.  Also, watching + doing is multi-tasking for a baby!  She will clap and wave at you soon, but it would not be out of the ordinary if she didn't mimic you  with movement until 10 - 12 months.  The fact that she mimics your smile, I think means she is fine. Many babies don't say mama or dada until 12 months.  Just keep talking to her and say the letter sounds M M M and D D D to her often and she will pick them up.

04-25-2011 05:04 PM
Calliope84

So.. I think she is a week or two from crawling (she can lurch forward and almost has it), now and will be 5 months on the 29th. Some things worry me, though. We went to this event the other day and there were about 50 babies there. She just sat there, occasionally showed interest in the book we brought for her, but mostly just studied everyone. I wanted to introduce her to other babies but she wouldn't interact at all. All the babies who could sit or crawl played the entire time alone or with each other and all the babies who couldn't do much or looked like they were 3-5 months old just sat there and didn't show much interest in anything. They did this game where we moved her arms up and down and danced with her a little and she got really excited during it and while watching the girl leading it all, though. 

 

The other thing is - she won't mimic me. She has never copied me. All my books say they start to copy you very early on. She does smile at me when I smile at her, but she smiles when she sees us, even if we are not looking. She is also squealing a lot lately and has ah-bo, oo-la type of words, but no dada or mama, yet.  All the books I have say babies take great interest in their hands, but I've never seen her look at them... until last night. She was extremely tired, lying in the bed after nursing and really out-of-it / staring and she lifted up one hand to the light and slowly turned it back and forth and moved her fingers very slowly in different positions and studied it. It was really, really weird.

04-25-2011 01:54 PM
emmaegbert

My son was very coordinated (like somewhat extraordinarily so, similar to your DD we have lots of pictures of him sitting and playing unassisted at 4m), he had definite favorite books by 7mo, he had quite a few signs and words by about 9m (I didn't count and I am not a good record-keeper by nature), and he walked very average time, one day after his first birthday. He could climb ladders with ease unassisted at 13m, could jump well by 14m, and so on. He began to vocally protest dirty/wet diapers and request to be changed at 15m, and was regularly using the potty if it was offered at 18m. He is still remarkably coordinated and graceful. He has always had excellent fine motor skills. He was speaking in complete grammatical sentences using past and future tenses etc by 2 (probably before 2, but I didn't realize it was unusual b/c several of the other kids he was friends with were more advanced). He was a joyful, super-energetic, strong-willed, funny, affectionate kid. He had lots of separation anxiety and definitely engaged and communicated far more with me than others. He tested 99.7 percentile on the WPSSI-III at age 5 (but that includes hitting the ceiling on several subtests for visual-spatial stuff so its *possible* that is a low-ball score). He did not read words or numbers independently until recently (at 6).

 

DS is at a gifted school with kids I believe all tested high-99th percentile (I haven't asked their parents) but I can easily see (and *have* heard, unprompted from several other parents) that many of the kids in his class have gross and fine motor delays, speech articulation issues, and issues with impulse control and problems with being easily overstimulated. I have no way to know if this is occurring at a higher-than-normal rate, or just normal for the age group- I am not an expert in this. Many of those kids with these "problems" are far advanced over my son in reading and math and may test higher. So I would certainly say that physical development doesn't seem to track with academic giftedness from what I've seen.

 

And as a parting thought- frankly with a baby I would recommend don't worry too much and don't put too much stock in those development trackers (unless your child is *delayed*- that may be different). A LOT of it evens out. What is important is to be there with her, where she is at. I just had to learn not to look at other kids and think "what is wrong with that limp, floppy baby" when they were perfectly fine- in fact their parents were well aware that they were just as magical and wonderful as my baby ;)

 

And as for IQ testing... From what I understand, there really isn't any point in testing a baby or toddler. I felt it was a bit silly to test my son at age 5 but we did it for school admission reasons. Basically testing becomes relevant when its guiding decisions about educational settings/choices or in more complex theraputic/diagnostic situations.

04-20-2011 06:08 AM
marimara

My dd was a very alert baby.  I have photos of her at 3 days old, eyes bright, wide open staring around the room and and at us.  As a baby she absolutely loved bright colors, paintings, books, and stories.  She was sitting up (propped up) at 4 months holding books and turning the pages. She would sit and look at them for a looong time.  She knew the alphabet/letters/numbers at 15 months and started reading 3 letter words at age 2.  Her gross motor skills were average, maybe a bit delayed.  She didn't crawl till 9 months, didn't walk till 13 months.  She couldn't ride a tricycle till she was almost 3.  She didn't get her first tooth till 13 months either.  Today as a 4 year old, she's reading on a 3rd grade level, writing stories and "books", is very creative, inquisitive,  and intuitive.  Her vocabulary is amazing and everyone comments on her intellect. The pediatrician told us she's most likely gifted which we know anyways.  Both parents (me and dh) were gifted as children.  She still is a bit slower physically.  She rides a bike now (with training wheels) and a scooter.  She can run and skip and dance and climb, but is still fairly clumsy and is prone to accidents, lol.  She has some sensitivities and I suspected Sensory Processing issues for a while but she hasn't had any therapy for it.  Her ped said that most gifted kids are fairly sensitive and that is most likely a part of it.  

04-18-2011 09:38 PM
Aufilia

I haven't the faintest if DD was a particularly alert baby (she was my first! lol) but she did love books early. She would always sit quietly and seem to pay attention when we read to her from about 2 months onward.  Her comprehension was very good and she's always enjoyed books that were "too advanced" for a child her age. She started to read around age 3 and I would guess she is reading on a 3rd grade level now (she's 5).

 

She started to talk around 8 months and never stopped; she easily had 500 words by 18 months. She has a good vocabulary now and uses a lot of complex words I don't hear from other 5-year-olds.

 

She had poor gross motor skills but sat alone at 6 months and crawls by 9--but then she didn't walk until 21 months. She is still taking physical therapy.

 

She also has sensory processing disorder, which in hindsight was apparent by the time she was about 1. She hated getting wet or dirty, hated messy hands, would flip out if something got spilled, has always been very, very particular about sleeping arrangements (never would cosleep -- she just couldn't handle being in our bed).  She still naps every afternoon--I think she needs it to unwind after being bombarded with sensory input at school all morning.

 

My son, who is 18 months, is opposite in nearly every way. He says 5 coherent words but has spectacular gross motor skills. Coslept until 14 months (but isn't much of a sleeper in general).  Couldn't've cared less about books until recently. Good problem solving, but seems fairly average in most ways. I haven't the faintest idea if he'll turn out to be gifted or not.

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