Mothering Forums - Reply to Topic

Thread: Real gardeners don't use gloves: Give me your best handscrub/salve recipes! Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-02-2013 07:23 PM
journeymom

Lol! We are 'decluttering', a word so inadequate to describe this undertaking. I've been sorting dusty, rusty, filthy things in the garage.  Washing hands over and over, my hands were literally hurting. So now I wear either my work gloves or disposable medical-type gloves, as much as possible. 

 

We're moving in a few days.  I haven't had a decent back yard in 10 years.  I am SO excited!  This house we're moving to has a REAL backyard and there WILL be tomato plants in the ground in the next couple months. 

02-02-2013 06:47 PM
SweetSilver

Reviving this old thread is definitely useful, but since the OP hasn't been online in 2 years, I doubt she'll see this.

 

I like to garden barehanded at home, but having been a professional gardener, there is a definite practicality to gloves, even for tasks that I don't normally pull on the gloves for at home.

 

I like the bath soaks.  DH's hands have permanent ground-in dirt.  He does get cracked hands, and Bag Balm seems to be the only thing that helps.  Keeping fingernails short (really short) helps a little to prevent too much getting stuck in there.  Heavy-duty hand brushes and good enough, I say.

 

My hands have been depressingly clean this last year.  I am looking forward to the next 2 weeks to get those hands both in the dirt and in those gloves.  I have blackberries to weed out, a viciously thorny (and gorgeous) rose to transplant.  I do hate wearing the gloves as they make my hands hot and sweaty, so I do prefer to go without when I can.  Can't always!

 

 And even though it was meant for a fun title, I'd like to add that "Real Gardeners Couldn't Give A Rip if People Think They Aren't Real Gardeners For Wearing Gloves Because Gloves Are Damn Useful Because When You Come Home From Gardening For Others All Day, The First Thing You Want To Do Do When You Get Home Is Do Work In Your Own Garden And Your Hands Appreciate A Little Respect" orngtongue.gif

02-02-2013 03:53 PM
Lovesong
Quote:
Originally Posted by g&a View Post

This thread cracks me up.  You obviously don't have thistles in your area...

 

Or sneaky nettles hiding everywhere...grrr. Or hogweed. Or for that matter wild roses. There is a reason my garden gloves are real leather.

02-02-2013 09:24 AM
MonarchMom I use hand cream AND gloves! Otherwise the dirt dries out my skin and nails. I like to rub a thick cream into my finger tips and nails and then put on the nitril gloves. I work in an office and can't be showing up with dirt under my nails. Planting tiny seeds, or transplanting might be an exception... But 90% of gardening is in the soil with gloves.
02-01-2013 11:02 AM
g&a

This thread cracks me up.  You obviously don't have thistles in your area...

09-21-2012 11:39 AM
justmama

pumice stone.  It gets rid of the ground in dirt that won't come out of the cracks and creases of your hands and feet.

09-09-2012 01:37 PM
gardenqueenie

I garden quite a lot, in fact have done it professionally. So I get the hands problem, some of which just goes with the territory.  However, recently I have noticed that if I keep a bucket of water with me when I am working and occasionally rinse my hands in it as I work, my hands don't get quite so stained (nor do the handles of my shovels get yucky when I am working with compost). Also, when I go inside I clean my fingernails with a brush, warm water & dish soap immediately, not letting the dirt dry under my nails. Having rinsed regularly outside the dirt is still wet and comes off my fingernails much more easily. If all else fails, I use Bon Ami scouring powder.

 

Bag balm is a good remedy for cracked hands. When I was a potter (ceramic), all the potters used it. Seemed to be the only thing that worked for us. It is for cow udders, but available in many places other than farm grange stores.  Look for a square green can on the store shelf.  It is a petroleum product, so if you don't like that, never mind. Hope this helps.   By the way,  I NEVER use gloves! :-)   

07-26-2009 11:37 AM
lightheart pulling up an older thread here, and I don't know if this was suggested or not but I tried it yesterday and it did work!! Veggie Wash... mine is in a spray bottle and it is sold to wash your fruits and veggies...

I just wet my hands, washed with soap like usual then sprayed it on full strength working it into my cuticles and all around then rinsed and followed up with another regular soap wash. Under my nails didn't come real clean, a nail brush would of helped I think.

bottle says safely removes waxes, chemicals and soil. The ingredients listed are water, natural cleaners made from corn and coconut, citrus oil, sodium citrate (a natural derivative of citrus fruit) glycerin (from coconut oil) and grapefruit seed extract.

I will warn that it burns and stings in all the little cuts, I have a fresh blister from using the rake and that stung big time! My hands weren't ground in yucky so I don't know how it will work on the true farmers hands out there but may be worth a try if you have a bottle of it or maybe a friend has one and you can wash your hands with it when you go visit. (maybe bring them some fruits of your harvest in exchange. )

Another thing that it helped with was smell, I ad been playing in the compost and my hands had that odor, not of nice mellowed compost but of rotting compost, took that smell off.

I think I will try it on mine and the kids' feet this evening since they are ground in dirty.
05-10-2009 03:11 AM
Jojo F. Wash with oil, or sugar and oil Butter is freaking awsome too Oh yes, lanolin at night feels sooooo good.
05-09-2009 09:40 PM
*Jessica*
Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen'nZoe View Post
I always have better luck cleaning my hands if I wash my hair first. The combination of the shampoo and running your fingers through your hair gets most of the dirt out, and then you can finish up with a nail brush.
:

Quote:
Originally Posted by AstridS View Post
I'm an archaeologist as well as a gardener. So I know all about dirty hands. The answer is: toothpaste.
I rinse my hands and my nails in toothpaste and then slander them in almond oil. An old archaeologist taught me this trick. Her hands are still soft and clean looking after many years at dig sites around the world.
If the cracks are really deep I apply lanolin before bedtime. It makes me smell like a sheep, but at least my hands are soft.
That I have to try! Toothpaste, who knew?! (And I'm super jealous of your job!)
05-08-2009 06:43 PM
Monkey's Mum I love lee valley! They have such cool garden stuff, but I always have to be very careful when I look through the catalog as I start to drool and my credit card appears in my hand
05-08-2009 03:20 AM
Carley
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey's Mum View Post
I don't wear gloves very often (usually just when I'm digging or raking). I use the "world's kindest nail brush" from Lee Valley tools and it works well.

http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...59&cat=2,42551

Whoa... that is exactly what I need! Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
05-08-2009 02:55 AM
Jane I've used lava soap, too - it has pumice sand in it to abrade the dirt away. I know there are homemade scrubs that use salt or sugar and oil. I wonder if you could use salt and regular dish soap?
05-07-2009 01:07 PM
journeymom I use Boraxo powdered hand soap and it really works. It's this grainy powder that scrubs your hands. It works every time. I don't mean to sound like an ad for the product, but this is what it says on the back of the can:

" Boraxo frees your hands from gardening gloves! Boraxo powdered hand soap removes dirt and soil from your hands. Its unique formula allows you to scrub your hands removing deep down dirt. Boraxo will remove most household and garden dirt."

It's no where near as harsh as dish washing liquid and my hands aren't as dried out, either. And it gets food smells off my hands, too.

The ingredients are sodium tetraborax decahydrate and 'fine toilet soap.'

Lanolin: try Lansinoh. It does not smell of anything. I first bought some when I was nursing my son, as it's meant for nursing mothers' sore nipples. I guess babies don't particularly like the taste or smell of sheep lanolin. I don't use it on my hands, I use it as a lip balm now (haven't nursed in eight years.), in fact my whole family uses it as a lip balm. But my sister does use it on her hands.

Again, I really don't mean to sound like I'm advertising the Boroxo, but it's the one thing I found that actually gets dirt and motor oil and food smells off my hands.


===========


Edited to say, that Lee Valley scrub brush looks really good. I used one to prep my hands when I visited my premature niece in the NICU.
05-07-2009 10:48 AM
AstridS I'm an archaeologist as well as a gardener. So I know all about dirty hands. The answer is: toothpaste.
I rinse my hands and my nails in toothpaste and then slander them in almond oil. An old archaeologist taught me this trick. Her hands are still soft and clean looking after many years at dig sites around the world.
If the cracks are really deep I apply lanolin before bedtime. It makes me smell like a sheep, but at least my hands are soft.
05-07-2009 09:02 AM
Monkey's Mum I don't wear gloves very often (usually just when I'm digging or raking). I use the "world's kindest nail brush" from Lee Valley tools and it works well.

http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...59&cat=2,42551
05-07-2009 08:39 AM
Hibou Not that I'm suggesting this, but this thread reminds me of my dad (a farmer) who used diesel fuel to get his hands clean before my little brother's graduation.

I'm loving all the suggestions, as I'm one of those women with permanently dirty looking hands all summer too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrogirl
I just wanted to tell you that as the mom with the nice hands, whenever I saw a woman with hands like yours, it immediately garnered my respect and admiration. I remember thinking "here's a woman who does stuff - stuff that i would like to do. How can i get to be friends with her?" and feeling embarrassed that I looked so wimpy and polished. Definitely be proud of your hands. It can tell you everything about a person.
Wow. I think I'll print this and put it on my fridge. :
05-06-2009 11:53 AM
PinkinPA Run your nails over abar of soap before gardening, it keeps the dirt out. For my hands, I just vaseline them before I go out.
05-06-2009 03:57 AM
Carley
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apricot View Post
I use nitrile exam gloves. If they're good enough for IV starts, they're good enough for anything I do in the garden.
: Brilliant!
05-05-2009 10:18 PM
Rhiannon Feimorgan I onlt wear gloves for cultivation and weeding. But that's what gets my hands the most dirty.
05-05-2009 07:22 PM
Jane I use nitrile exam gloves. If they're good enough for IV starts, they're good enough for anything I do in the garden. I tend to wear my mechanic's gloves over them for more durability when weeding.
05-05-2009 04:49 PM
tankgirl73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carley View Post
How the heck do you guys wear gloves? I would never trust gloves around my seeds sprouts or transplants. Gloves block sensation!
I wonder the same thing. I haven't done any gardening in years, and getting set up this year, I bought a nice pair of gloves. Snug-fitting, good quality.

Then I filled my starter pots and put seeds in... and quickly took the gloves off! I couldn't handle anything! Even the snuggest gloves I could find were still too bulky at the fingertips. I couldn't control anything with NEARLY enough precision for handling seeds, small pots, and baby seedlings.

And lest anyone say I'm just lacking find motor coordination, let me point out that I am a professional classical pianist with a Master's degree lol
05-05-2009 01:32 PM
Carley
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrogirl View Post
I just wanted to tell you that as the mom with the nice hands, whenever I saw a woman with hands like yours, it immediately garnered my respect and admiration. I remember thinking "here's a woman who does stuff - stuff that i would like to do. How can i get to be friends with her?" and feeling embarrassed that I looked so wimpy and polished. Definitely be proud of your hands. It can tell you everything about a person.

I can't tell you how better this makes me feel! Even if other mom's don't think this way, at least I know somebody out there might!!! Thank you thank you thank you!
05-05-2009 01:31 PM
Carley GREAT ideas!!! I hadn't thought of lemon juice, Dawn or slathering up before gardening! I guess I should buy some Dawn? Heh.

How the heck do you guys wear gloves? I would never trust gloves around my seeds sprouts or transplants. Gloves block sensation! I probably couldn't even hammer with gloves on. Definitely not a skill saw or most of the work I do around here.

I can see wearing them for cultivation, but I still prefer to get my hands in there when transplanting or planting seeds. I only use gloves if I'm using a long tool in the rain. Rock crushers & hoes get slippery here in the PacNW!

It's clearly my own doing. Maybe I should keep food handler's gloves in my bag

Pedicure... mmm.... *drools*
05-05-2009 11:05 AM
Rosemarino Not that you asked, but I wear gloves too. Unless it's a really wet and muddy job. And I'm a REAL gardener! Really, really, really, real.

I second the baking soda. Also, here's a trick if you get into poison ivy or oak. Wash immediately with Dawn which cuts the grease.
05-05-2009 10:05 AM
SarahGuinn I wear gloves for some things. :

I also carry a travel sized tube of burts bees hand repair in my pocket for when I'm taking them on and off. My hands are torn up from winter still, though.
05-05-2009 12:27 AM
luv-my-boys I use gloves but I do occassionally still get dirt on my hands. I make up a mixture of course salt (like the kind you use for margaritas) and baking soda and scrub with a pumice stone brush.
05-05-2009 12:24 AM
lightheart Usually washing dishes and scrubbing the house does the job for me so I save chores up like that for a day or so before I want my hands to be really presentable. I do wear gloves, not always, but probably 50% of the time, more for when I'm pounding with a tool or something like that, not just for digging in the dirt. They are not as clean as when I waited tables many moons ago (like you said folks probably don't like to see built up dirt and grime when they are being served food, back then I was careful to always where gloves outdoors when my livelihood depending on my tips)

My hubby swears by dove soap, he has been known to use lava and gojo on his hands, while testing different soaps out on our son dove came along in our trials - now we always keep a pink bar of it around for hubby to use on occasion, he dislikes the smell but puts up with it for the cleaning that it does on his hands. He says the white unscented doesn't clean as well as the pink. He gets those deep dark cracks from winter exposure that just seem to fill with dirt that won't ever go away.
05-04-2009 09:30 PM
Rhiannon Feimorgan I just thought of something. A sugar scrub might help. Mix a bit of sugar with some oil (any kind-olive, vegetable...) Make a paste and rub it over your hands then rinse off with very warm water.
05-04-2009 07:12 PM
notwonamesalike not much help here - as I wear gloves...but

If you scrape your nails across a bar of soap before you go out to garden, it will make clean up much easier. The dirt doesn't get under the nails and it keeps them nice and clean.
This thread has more than 30 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off