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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-06-2013 11:25 AM
racheleuphoria

When I was choosing resources for my daughter's 1st grade Waldorf year, I bought several different sets of stuff used through the Waldorf yahoo group that sells lots of used Waldorf resources.  I looked at everything in person, devouring it, and then resold what I didn't want.  On what I resold, I only lost the cost of shipping!  I highly recommend spending time now to buy resources of interest, look them over and then plan for the new year.  You really do have to see stuff in person to decide!

 

That said, we used Enki for K and 1st grade.  For 2nd grade we are doing a more eclectic style year, rather than Waldorf-oriented.  I love the foundation that Waldorf gave her for imagination, love of language and understanding of math concepts.  But, now that she is older I find it easier to implement other education styles.  That said, my younger son is going to do the same Waldorf 1st grade that my daughter did a few years ago.  I don't want to change a thing!
 

02-04-2013 11:44 AM
GreenVariety

Can this be converted to a group so you don't have to read through all 20 pages or re-ask an old question please! :-) I would also love to see a "book list" for toddlers (because I have a toddler), activity recommendations for daily activities, etc! But this is a lot to read through :-D

 

BTW have my "Celebrating Irish Festivals: Calendar of Seasonal Celebrations" on the way and just got Earthways. Read "Heaven on Earth" when my son was wee and "You are your childs first teacher" recently. Love this stuff. Just would love to ask some specific questions.

01-18-2013 07:56 PM
mamahawk

Hi!  I understand your frustration, not being able to thumb through the curriculum before buying.  Which ones are you looking at?

 

We are going to be using Oak Meadow next year, which is considered 'Waldorf inspired'.  From what I've been able to look at on their website, it seems lighter on the spiritual/ anthroposophy stuff vs. Christopherus ( a true Waldorf curriculum).  

 

Christopherus is more true I think to Steiner's philosophy, and the presence of Steiner and anthroposophy in the curriculum is very discernible to me.  (in presentation, activities, etc.) However, I've heard that Christopherus is kind of 'open-ended', in that they give you an outline of subjects and suggestions, but it is up to you how you implement them-  So I see no reason why you couldn't tweak it to your liking.  Disclaimer-  I haven't used Christopherus so I can't testify to this from experience-  but I have done a lot of research and comparisons between Oak Meadow and Christopherus and this is what I have heard and seen in forums and discussions.

 

I think both are good curriculums (based on what I've seen on their websites and in my research) for Waldorf families, or for those who like the Waldorf pedagogy.  

 

I guess I still feel like I haven't answered your question though.  What parts of anthroposophy are you uncomfortable with (if any?).  The curriculums do not preach or attempt to indoctrinate students into anthroposophy, if that is what you are asking.  Just like as in a waldorf school (where my children are currently), anthroposophy is not brought to the children, or taught, but it does influence the curriculum and the teachers interactions with their students.  My oldest is a seventh grader, and if you were to ask her what anthroposophy was, she would have no idea what you are talking about, even though it's influence is present all around her-  from the color of her classroom, her interactions with her teacher, and with the intention and careful structure of her lessons. Does that make sense?

01-17-2013 12:56 AM
ejmama

Hi I'm new to this board and going to be new o homeschooling as soon as I figure out what I am doing.  I have visited heWaldorf school that is with in driving distance and love the feel there.  I like what I see the students doing and think it fits my DD (9) very well.  I've done a lot of research of waldorf curriculum and here are my concerns:

 

1.) I can't touch them and leaf through them before I make a decision 

      I want to compare and contrast, read the lessons for myself, and feel the books

 

2.) Wondering how much of Steiners anthroposophy is weaved through the different curriculums and how I can or can't leave that out of my homeschooling without taking away the integrity of the curriculum.

 

Any words of wisdom?

 

-April

11-25-2010 05:34 AM
Alotufuz


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nursingnaturalmom View Post

Anyone have a nice verse for after main lesson or any other transition time in your waldorf homeschool?
Circle time to start our day, but I thought having a verse for each transition might be nice too and then a nice one to end our day

Chandi


 

I just received a copy of seven times the sun and it is filled with all those potential verses for transitions.

11-24-2010 10:53 AM
Mittsy

We're very new to Waldorf, discovered this a bit late. We're starting off our Waldorf homeschool journey using Oak Meadow(Pre-K and K) for DS(4 in Dec) and DD(5), but we're open to looking into either Christopherus or Little Acorn if OM turns out not to be the best fit. I would say our biggest challenge so far is finances, we're in a pretty good financial position but buying all organic/wood/natural stuff as well as new curricula is certainly not cheap. My biggest inspireations are The Parenting Passageway blog, I'm so in love with Carrie, and my DD as she LOVES every aspect of Waldorf it is a really good fit for her.

11-24-2010 09:22 AM
AngelBee

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommariffic View Post

How many pages does it have to be, before it can be a new thread?



Wee could pick a number! :D

11-24-2010 09:19 AM
mommariffic

How many pages does it have to be, before it can be a new thread?

11-24-2010 09:16 AM
AngelBee

Another great blog:

 

http://theparentingpassageway.com/ 

11-24-2010 09:13 AM
AngelBee

Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugz View Post

Subbin' ... I have a 2 year old and we're just starting to think about homeschool.  I'll probably find some ideas when I read back through the thread, but I would love some resources for getting started with waldorf homeschool and also for the early years too.  I've looked up some of the book recs I've seen, but the libraries here just don't have them, and I never see any waldorf resources at the used bookstore... is there a used or cheaper option to find these while I'm trying to figure out if this is for me?



:hug I am trying to figure this all out as well.  I will try to make a list for you of where I am getting my info from.

 

http://www.waldorfjourney.typepad.com/ 

This blog has been super helpful. 

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/homeschoolingwaldorf/ 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/waldorfhomeeducators/ 

Yahoo groups

 

That is to start. :)

11-24-2010 08:33 AM
treehugz

Subbin' ... I have a 2 year old and we're just starting to think about homeschool.  I'll probably find some ideas when I read back through the thread, but I would love some resources for getting started with waldorf homeschool and also for the early years too.  I've looked up some of the book recs I've seen, but the libraries here just don't have them, and I never see any waldorf resources at the used bookstore... is there a used or cheaper option to find these while I'm trying to figure out if this is for me?

11-21-2010 12:53 PM
AngelBee

Read throu alot of this thread and decided to bump :)

02-21-2010 05:49 PM
Nursingnaturalmom Anyone have a nice verse for after main lesson or any other transition time in your waldorf homeschool?
Circle time to start our day, but I thought having a verse for each transition might be nice too and then a nice one to end our day

Chandi
02-07-2010 04:45 PM
blumom2boyz
Quote:
Originally Posted by simplify4balance View Post
Hello all!
My DD is about to turn 5.
I love Waldorf... but I wonder if she will truly be learning enough?
She can already read... mostly just from reading cuddled up in my lap. She loves workbooks, though I only do them with her if she asks. It just seems that she could learn so much academically right now... not to mention that she seems like she could happily fall into a solid routine of doing school work everyday. She enjoys practicing writing letters and numbers and always seems to be discovering interesting letter and number facts on her own by being mindful of the world around her.
So I thought that I would purchase some type of Waldorf curriculum (mostly to keep us moving forward with homeschooling in an organized way which makes me feel confident that I am ACTUALLY Doing Something with her) and then supplement it with workbooks and gently teaching her math and reading as she requests it. Or I considered buying a a complimentary academic curriculum to supplement our Waldorf work.
The more I read about Waldorf... the more unsure I am that she should even be working on anything academic? But I am feeling nervous that she won't be exactly on par with her school attending peers as far at the 3 R's go.
Can I really just teach her a Waldorf curriculum and have faith that she will eventually learn all the 'regular' stuff when she is a bit older?
What about when she wants to do more formal learning- eg. workbooks, handwriting practice? Seems silly to discourage her!
Please, please give me some loving and balanced ideas as well as resources.
(I think that the Oak Meadow curriculum includes some academics?)
It sounds to me like you already have your mind made up! If you aren't comfortable with the what's and the why's behind Waldorf (what is introduced at what age and why it is done then), then there is no reason to pursue this for your daughter. Take what you like about Waldorf (I am assuming it is the arts, stories, and large focus on nature) and incorporate that into your life.

Good Luck!
02-07-2010 04:40 PM
blumom2boyz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post
Question for you Waldorfy mamas, how do you do the seasons part when you live somewhere without classic seasons? We have four seasons, sort of, but it would take a lot of attention and also pretending to make them all out. Mostly though, we just have two seasons; wet and raw and cool, and HOT humid and dry as can be.

DS has seen snow a few times, so he understands what it is fine. But, it's not at all the rhythm we lead.

And, that just leaves me confused.
No reason to "make up" the seasons if they don't exist where you live! Use your geographic area as a guide for your own nature stories. Observe and watch what your local animals are doing at certain times of the year, etc. If not much changes, so be it. It is what it is!

Your "season" will also revolve around what festivals you participate in (not sure where you are), so maybe focus more on that then the "snow in winter that never comes".
02-06-2010 09:49 PM
Past_VNE Question for you Waldorfy mamas, how do you do the seasons part when you live somewhere without classic seasons? We have four seasons, sort of, but it would take a lot of attention and also pretending to make them all out. Mostly though, we just have two seasons; wet and raw and cool, and HOT humid and dry as can be.

DS has seen snow a few times, so he understands what it is fine. But, it's not at all the rhythm we lead.

And, that just leaves me confused.
01-29-2010 04:16 PM
pampered_mom simplify4balance - You might find this link helpful.
01-29-2010 02:34 AM
simplify4balance Hello all!
My DD is about to turn 5.
I love Waldorf... but I wonder if she will truly be learning enough?
She can already read... mostly just from reading cuddled up in my lap. She loves workbooks, though I only do them with her if she asks. It just seems that she could learn so much academically right now... not to mention that she seems like she could happily fall into a solid routine of doing school work everyday. She enjoys practicing writing letters and numbers and always seems to be discovering interesting letter and number facts on her own by being mindful of the world around her.
So I thought that I would purchase some type of Waldorf curriculum (mostly to keep us moving forward with homeschooling in an organized way which makes me feel confident that I am ACTUALLY Doing Something with her) and then supplement it with workbooks and gently teaching her math and reading as she requests it. Or I considered buying a a complimentary academic curriculum to supplement our Waldorf work.
The more I read about Waldorf... the more unsure I am that she should even be working on anything academic? But I am feeling nervous that she won't be exactly on par with her school attending peers as far at the 3 R's go.
Can I really just teach her a Waldorf curriculum and have faith that she will eventually learn all the 'regular' stuff when she is a bit older?
What about when she wants to do more formal learning- eg. workbooks, handwriting practice? Seems silly to discourage her!
Please, please give me some loving and balanced ideas as well as resources.
(I think that the Oak Meadow curriculum includes some academics?)
01-26-2010 12:07 AM
chrissy Thanks for your response. I think you're right. I think it is a combination of the older brother (whom she completely idolizes) and the preschool experience that have her so fixated on reading, writing, and even math right now.

Today was our baking day, and so after our walk and circle, we made blueberry muffins and then bread. It took a pretty good while. But still, afterward, when I sat down to work with Noah, she wanted to do what he was doing. She actually copied most of his work into her book.

So, I am going to try to get more creative about alternatives for her during my main lesson time with Noah. Hmmm, just now I'm thinking perhaps making that sort of a time for her to babysit her younger brother might work. I need to think more on that.

Thanks so much for your thoughts!
01-24-2010 04:43 PM
racheleuphoria Chrissy, I think this is a pretty common tension to feel with your kindy-aged child who has recently been removed from preschool. I struggled with this last year when my then 4-year-old (who had recently stopped preschool) wanted to learn to read, write and do "schoolwork". It's funny how a year later we have completely reached a balance!

My approach was to be clear and honest with her a few times, as in "At home, baking, painting, handiwork, etc are your schoolwork!" We removed any lingering workbooks from our house and started having scheduled time for drawing on blank paper and the like. I think that because I felt confident and excited about this new form of "school" for her, she bought in. Granted, she doesn't have an older sibling to entice her along ;0)

It sounds like your daughter can write already? My DD, who is now 5 as of Nov, also writes fairly well. She has taken to self-directed writing of her stories. I do tell her how words are spelled, but I don't give that activity any special preferance or honor than painting, for example. My DD is very verbal - it's her thing. Writing down stories is one way she plays. I don't feel that it's off-balance, because we also play outside every day, do art, I tell stories, and she loves handiwork.

My suggestion is that you consider your daughter's overall kindy experience. It sounds like you're doing a lot of great, well-rounded activities. IMO if you indulge her desire to write down some words and don't elevate it as a "school" activity, but treat it like play, you'll help her deal with the transition in a way that honors her interests.

As I said, my DD really wanted me to teach her how to read. I did firmly, kindly tell her that learning to read was for later. That she might learn all by herself when she was ready, but that we weren't going to do lessons until she was older. You child will trust you if you feel 100% confident about the decision. Maybe share with her about all she is learning already all day long!
01-24-2010 11:17 AM
chrissy hi there Waldorf homeschoolers

i am looking for some ideas on what to do with/for my sweet 5yo, Lilah. she is pretty newly 5 (her birthday is 10/1), so she wouldn't be due to start first grade until fall of 2011. meanwhile, she is dying for first grade work right now. part of this is probably b/c she was in preschool until just recently, and though it was a play based preschool, they did letter of the week and things like that. in any case, she and my 8yo son, Noah, have been home since November. Noah is in 2nd grade.

i have been trying very hard to create a solid kindy rhythm for her, but it just doesn't seem like it's enough. she is constantly asking me how to spell words, copying things from other places, trying to sound out words. since november i have been trying to gently "ahh" and "hmmm" her, but it is really beginning to feel like i'm ignoring her or putting her off.

i make sure to always have something to do with her, especially for her, before i start work with my 2nd grader, or sometimes once he has gotten started. she does seem to enjoy that, but she really wants more academic work. she fully enjoys the kindy things we do (baking, painting, crafts, housework...) but when we're done that she wants "work."

i really don't know what to do. i by no means am trying to suggest that she is some gifted genius or anything, though of course she is smart

i guess i am looking for ways to either gently guide her back away from academics or ways to gently introduce her, in ways that will fulfill her but not further awaken her too soon.
01-16-2010 03:27 PM
bluebell
Quote:
Originally Posted by calynde View Post
Hi Bluebell,

Let me start off by saying that I have a similar age gap between my kids as you...and really, the only time I'm able to sit with my 7 year old and do something focused is when the little one takes a nap. So if I were in your position with the needy baby...we wouldn't do much together homeschool-wise. I understand your predicament!

I might have a couple of suggestions. First, do you think your older child would do a few things on her own? Although I do have a short window where I can do stuff with my son, he wants more than that...so we started a kind of Waldorf-inspired-workbox system...where I put in a few things in his "box" and he works on them throughout the day when he feels like it. Another idea is to (for example 1st grade) tell the fairy tale before bed (when the other child can be watched by dad maybe) and then have the main lesson book set up at the table before lunch or dinner so that they can work on it while you prepare the meal. I suppose neither is ideal, but perhaps a starting point for how you can think about moving forward.

Doing a true Steiner-based curriculum at home is actually fairly time-intensive...there is a lot of prep to tailor it to the individual child etc. I find this preparation time and pre-reading on my end to be extremely beneficial to me as a person...but we do have to look at where we are in our life. Maybe that would work better for you next year? Oak Meadow has an all-in-one curriculum that is Waldorf-inspired and it's laid out for you so there is little prep. It's not as "magical" as writing your own but there are plenty of good ideas in there, and a lot of unschooly types use it to pull activities from without following it to the letter.

That being said, I think unschooling with a Waldorf flair works very well for certain families. You could work on creating a more waldorfy space at home and adding in more rhythm to your day and week and month. If you went fully into this with all the crafts, festivals, food prep, stories etc, I would imagine it to be very enriching for your DD.

I hope you find what you're looking for. Good luck!

p/s The book Heaven on Earth is wonderful and has lots of ideas for setting up your home and life rhythms for young children.
calynde, thanks so much for posting, its great to know that others have similar age gaps and with that similar needs to meet. i will definitly check out the oak meadow curriculum, if it can be loosly applied that sounds great, as i dont' think i'll be able to keep up with anything too strictly and also my dd is extremely strong willed and if she feels that i'm directing things too much she'll not be happy.
i will also have a look at the book you recomended as i would really like to get a rhythm going - we lacked a rhythm when dd was a baby and toddler and i think she really needed it.
i really appreciate your posting your tips and experience thanks.
01-13-2010 05:21 PM
calynde
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiminalOne View Post
I do have to say that Oak Meadow doesn't include hearing the story and then sleeping on it before working with it. And I have found the sleep cycle to be amazing.
Oak Meadow 1st grade definitely does this...I don't know about later grades.

I agree with the sleep cycle...it has worked very well for us!
01-13-2010 05:18 PM
calynde Hi Bluebell,

Let me start off by saying that I have a similar age gap between my kids as you...and really, the only time I'm able to sit with my 7 year old and do something focused is when the little one takes a nap. So if I were in your position with the needy baby...we wouldn't do much together homeschool-wise. I understand your predicament!

I might have a couple of suggestions. First, do you think your older child would do a few things on her own? Although I do have a short window where I can do stuff with my son, he wants more than that...so we started a kind of Waldorf-inspired-workbox system...where I put in a few things in his "box" and he works on them throughout the day when he feels like it. Another idea is to (for example 1st grade) tell the fairy tale before bed (when the other child can be watched by dad maybe) and then have the main lesson book set up at the table before lunch or dinner so that they can work on it while you prepare the meal. I suppose neither is ideal, but perhaps a starting point for how you can think about moving forward.

Doing a true Steiner-based curriculum at home is actually fairly time-intensive...there is a lot of prep to tailor it to the individual child etc. I find this preparation time and pre-reading on my end to be extremely beneficial to me as a person...but we do have to look at where we are in our life. Maybe that would work better for you next year? Oak Meadow has an all-in-one curriculum that is Waldorf-inspired and it's laid out for you so there is little prep. It's not as "magical" as writing your own but there are plenty of good ideas in there, and a lot of unschooly types use it to pull activities from without following it to the letter.

That being said, I think unschooling with a Waldorf flair works very well for certain families. You could work on creating a more waldorfy space at home and adding in more rhythm to your day and week and month. If you went fully into this with all the crafts, festivals, food prep, stories etc, I would imagine it to be very enriching for your DD.

I hope you find what you're looking for. Good luck!

p/s The book Heaven on Earth is wonderful and has lots of ideas for setting up your home and life rhythms for young children.
01-13-2010 03:17 PM
quester Hi everyone! We'll be starting up soon- and I also find Enki very appealing. I am planning to order it next week and starting soon after.

01-11-2010 12:24 AM
LiminalOne
Quote:
Originally Posted by pampered_mom View Post
I should probably clarify a tiny bit...it's mostly a mechanical type query as in what do you use to make your plan? Online curriculum scheduler (like some of the Classical types use)? Simple word document/pencil and paper kind of thing? Cheap-o teachers book? I'm not sure if the general hs type methods that are talked about will work or are well suited for Waldorf. I know ALGF has a planner EBook, but it's $20 and I'm wondering if that's even worth it.
I'm new to this thread, but I didn't see an answer to this question, but I fold a piece of paper in half each direction to get four squares and then use 7 of them (including the backside) to write my plan for the week. On the plan, I have abbreviations for each piece of the day in order, from movement to my chores to quiet time to snack and all the way to dinner and evening plans. I can always change the order of events to match a special day and then I can see which days make sense for a complicated dinner and which demand quicker fare. I like it not being on the computer as I try to keep that off as much as possible during the day. Very customized and easy. You could photocopy them blank if you want, but I create a new one each weekend for the coming week. I also have my blocks planned roughly 4 weeks to a sheet of paper.

Hope that helps. We're doing Enki in 3rd grade with incomplete materials and so I've been doing lots of planning, but enjoying it all. Just about to finish up with the Torah cultural block (14 weeks long) with a musical about Moses put on with some friends.

I have seen a few other curricula and have friends that each love Christopherus and Live Education. I do have to say that Oak Meadow doesn't include hearing the story and then sleeping on it before working with it. And I have found the sleep cycle to be amazing.

Angie
Finn, June 2001 and Theo, April 2005
01-10-2010 08:17 AM
bluebell hi i'm in england just outside london, i've just found this thread and am really glad! - i'm sorry i've not been able to read the whole thread and have only read the first few posts - i'm hoping to get some time to read more.
i've been thinking about starting a steiner curriculum with my dd who is now 6 1/2yrs. i've always been interested in steiner and i used to take dd to the parent and child groups at our local steiner school, we did try kindergarten for 1 day but dd didn't want to go to school and i have always wanted to homeschool her anyway.
my biggest challenge at the moment is that i have a 4month old ds who is very very high need - (just the same as dd was which was why we have a big age gap!) i'm finding actually doing anything for or with dd very difficult - i'm just about able to make her meals and thats about it, because ds is very diffiuclt to get to sleep and then keep asleep (he'll only sleep on my lap in a nursing chair and if i so much as move he wakes up and then its back to square one again) so most of my day is spent trying to help him sleep and stay asleep (slings only work if we go out). so at the moment she is getting very little attention from me, and unfortunatly the dreaded dvd usage has been creeping up, we've had moments of being tv free before ds was born but at the moment i'm too exhausted to argue and she is so bored, it is not what i want for her but i dont' know how to get out of the habit again. she is now asking for a nintendo - which i'm completly opposed to.
so i'm trying to get more motivated to follow a curriculum, as we have basically been autonomous up until now but i think she needs some more structure becuase i don't think she is getting her educational needs met.
anyway i just wanted to say 'hello' and sub to this thread because i'm hoping i can get some more ideas as to how i can get more organised.
is it easy to transition from being autonomous (i think that is that the same as unschooled?) to a waldorf curriculum? and do you follow all the anthroposophical guidelines - such as no tv and video games etc?
i do hope this makes sense - i'm struggling to think straight at the moment!
01-08-2010 08:31 PM
LuxPerpetua
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrissy View Post
I love your story idea! I think I am going to use that. Hopefully I can remember enough for my oldest, who will be 9 on his next birthday! What a beautiful idea!

As for curricula choices, I admit that I have a bit of a curricula and book collecting... problem. In the past couple of years (and I must admit that for the majority of that time my kids have gone to school!) I have owned Enki (kindy and grade 1), Oak Meadow (grade 1), Christopherus (kindy, grade 1 and the books for all grades), ALGF (grade 1, grade 2, math book), and Live Ed (grade 1 and 2). Phew! I bought much of it used and sold much of what I didn't need (or what I thought I didn't need!). My short and sweet reviews are as follows.... I did not like Oak Meadow at all. I did like Enki, but for a first time homeschooler, I found it a lot of work, plus it doesn't go any higher than 2nd grade. ALGF is GREAT for the money. The 2nd grade and math book I think are a fabulous buy! Christopherus, love it! Live Ed, love it!

For 2nd grade, I am using bits and pieces of Christopherus, ALGF, Live Ed and do-it-myself.

Next year I will use either Christopherus or Live Ed for 3rd grade and 1st grade. Hopefully whichever I choose, I will stick with for the duration.
I'm glad you like the birthday ring idea. We've had a lot of fun with it. I always go back and look at our digital pictures at the end of the year to try and remember what we've done. That's a big help!

As for curricula, I can totally see me following your footsteps. I'm pretty certain we're going to do Enki for kindy-2nd and then switch but to what I'm not sure. I actually think I'm going to buy ALGF, Christopherus, and Live Ed! to compare in person and then see. I'll probably buy ALGF each year anyway because it's so cheap, why not?, but I'm really torn between Christopherus and Live Ed! Live Ed! you cannot buy pieces individually I know, which is a bit annoying, but I loved the samples I saw online, much moreso than Christopherus, but without seeing both it's just so hard to tell. Would you mind letting me know how next year goes with your choice? I'm really curious.
01-08-2010 07:37 PM
chrissy
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuxPerpetua View Post
We do something similar only our ring just has the figures set beside the candles, not in holes. We have a birthday story that I write a new "page" for each year that goes by, starting with pregnancy and birth and then I add a new page for what dd did the previous year. We also include pictures. We read this as we do our b-day ring and light a candle for each year as we read (ours has a central candle for her "birth" that we use to light all the other candles). We set this out on our breakfast table along with dd's birthday crown and birthday balloon. It's her favorite part of her whole birthday.
I love your story idea! I think I am going to use that. Hopefully I can remember enough for my oldest, who will be 9 on his next birthday! What a beautiful idea!

As for curricula choices, I admit that I have a bit of a curricula and book collecting... problem. In the past couple of years (and I must admit that for the majority of that time my kids have gone to school!) I have owned Enki (kindy and grade 1), Oak Meadow (grade 1), Christopherus (kindy, grade 1 and the books for all grades), ALGF (grade 1, grade 2, math book), and Live Ed (grade 1 and 2). Phew! I bought much of it used and sold much of what I didn't need (or what I thought I didn't need!). My short and sweet reviews are as follows.... I did not like Oak Meadow at all. I did like Enki, but for a first time homeschooler, I found it a lot of work, plus it doesn't go any higher than 2nd grade. ALGF is GREAT for the money. The 2nd grade and math book I think are a fabulous buy! Christopherus, love it! Live Ed, love it!

For 2nd grade, I am using bits and pieces of Christopherus, ALGF, Live Ed and do-it-myself.

Next year I will use either Christopherus or Live Ed for 3rd grade and 1st grade. Hopefully whichever I choose, I will stick with for the duration.
01-08-2010 07:05 PM
LuxPerpetua We do something similar only our ring just has the figures set beside the candles, not in holes. We have a birthday story that I write a new "page" for each year that goes by, starting with pregnancy and birth and then I add a new page for what dd did the previous year. We also include pictures. We read this as we do our b-day ring and light a candle for each year as we read (ours has a central candle for her "birth" that we use to light all the other candles). We set this out on our breakfast table along with dd's birthday crown and birthday balloon. It's her favorite part of her whole birthday.
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