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Thread: Do you regret or love the popular baby name (top 5 SSA list) you chose? Reply to Thread
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08-01-2014 10:13 AM
EnviroBecca Janet Lewis, have you considered making Rennie a nickname for something? Renata...Karen...Lorenna...

PeaceBeWithYou wrote:
Quote:
Isabella is the 3rd on the list of national most popular names - http://www.ourbabynamer.com/2013-popular-names.html That makes the name quite popular but considering that it means that there are 19000 girls of this name named last year.. that gives you average of 380 Isabellas born in 2012 per state.. Considering that they all will go to schools somwere.. each state has on average 200 public schools and scores of private schools and that would mean at worse one Isabela per class level per school. Considering that each school has few kindergarten classes.. that brings chances of having so many Isabellas in the class even more down. Lastly school makes an effort not to put the kids with the same name in the same class for their comfort and school's practicality to avoid mistakes.
The numerical reasoning isn't quite accurate because names are not evenly distributed around the country. Think about what is popular in your immediate area as well, especially among people who are similar to you in academic values--because not only will they likely choose the same school, but many schools group students by academic ability to some extent. My name, Rebecca, was fairly popular at the time I was born but was a name used more by college-educated parents; 4 of the 5 Rebeccas in my high school grade were in honors classes, so in any given section of a course there was likely to be another Rebecca/Becca/Becky.
07-30-2014 02:34 PM
IsaFrench Isabelle was a popular name in the sixties in France ... one year, there were 7 of us -out of 35 i think- in grade school, i mean in the same class ....
nowadays, hardly anybody french will call their daughter Isabelle (those names that were SO trendy tend to become less popular after a few years)
i only know french women about my age (50 something) called Isabelle

.... on the other hand at least 4 english speaking expats - local to me- have a less than 10 years old "Isabelle" amongst their children ...
07-30-2014 07:06 AM
JanetLewis Hi like the name Isabella a lot. I came across it in movies and books, it has its own glory. Its popular because of that. But I have in mind the name Rennie. Its a bit uncommon but I like it.
09-29-2013 06:27 AM
PeaceBeWithYou

1. I agree with previous posters - it is not fair for your husband to have the only say on the name and it appear to be so. At least he should enjoy picking the first child and give you the freedom of choice for the second one.

2. Bring things to some perspective for you - Isabella is the 3rd on the list of national most popular names - http://www.ourbabynamer.com/2013-popular-names.html

That makes the name quite popular but considering that it means that there are 19000 girls of this name named last year.. that gives you average of 380 Isabellas born in 2012 per state.. Considering that they all will go to schools somwere.. each state has on average 200 public schools and scores of private schools and that would mean at worse one Isabela per class level per school. Considering that each school has few kindergarten classes.. that brings chances of having so many Isabellas in the class even more down. Lastly school makes an effort not to put the kids with the same name in the same class for their comfort and school's practicality to avoid mistakes.

 

3. Per comparison when my dc was born, I did not think of implications of the name popularity and I just happened to love the very popular name which was 2nd on the national list at the time. It was just few years ago. Now at school there are literarly 2 girls of this name on her grade level in all classes. TWO. Not to say that there are no girls of this name in other levels but it will be pretty much the same ratio.

 

4. Names popularity changes fast. It is popular today it won't be popular next year. I promise :) Just wait for an actor or actress or other celebrity naming a kiddo and watch the trends changing.

 

5. I see lots of benefits of having a popular name and I can't speak of having a child named unique name as I don't have that experience but here is what I feel about us:

- everyone knows how to spell the name.

- people like the name a lot and say so

- child is very happy to hear so many kind comments "Oh, what a beautiful name, I love your name" and although many would comment on any kid's name and it is true for myself :) my dc just get tons of more comments.

- people have instant association with the name. that helps with instant positive reaction. It is not because of your child but because they know someone famous and they like that person and you get extra points on that first impression charts :)

- life is so much easier for people with popular and nice names, everyone remembers your name instantly and will call your child by that.

Example - it is enough to introduce your child by Isabella usually only once for people to remember, whereas it takes many times for them

to remember Sarifaihata for instance.

- in many cultures there is a believe that a name makes a person and when you come to think of it all Barbaras you know and all Susans and all Stevens and Kevins tend to be somehow .. similar and there is something that the name brings to them that is  in common?

congrats on your baby and happy naming.

09-28-2013 07:22 PM
erigeron
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackieP View Post
 

Although I'm not a fan of 'trendy' names, I have to say, I really do love the name Bella, and I also love the name Sophie.  I'm not ruling them out with this one.  My fave. so far is Lucy for a girl.

I think there's also a difference in terms of "trendy" between names like Bella or Sophie, versus, say, Ryleigh or Madison. The former are names that have been around for a long time that are experiencing a spike in popularity over baseline; the latter are pretty much unique to this generation. There's a different feel to them. Also I would expect a name that has been around for centuries to continue to be around at some popularity, whereas the jury's still out on some of these newer names. I mean, 100 years from now will anybody still be naming their kids Madison or will it be completely unheard of? Who knows? There are definitely a few names in my family genealogy that you'd never, ever see on anyone nowadays, but there are also names out there that were more or less invented by a single individual at some point that are now in common use (Jessica, for instance, was invented by Shakespeare). 

09-27-2013 07:02 PM
JackieP

Although I'm not a fan of 'trendy' names, I have to say, I really do love the name Bella, and I also love the name Sophie.  I'm not ruling them out with this one.  My fave. so far is Lucy for a girl.

09-27-2013 07:00 PM
JackieP

My daughter is Lauren, and I have no regrets. It's a common name, but it's a sweet, pretty name.  I wanted to play around with spellings, and maybe spell it Laurynne, but then I decided that she'd like it better if it were spelled the conventional way, so that people didn't CONSTANTLY misspell her name.

My son, Trevor, isn't a super-popular name.

 

My third?

Thor.  :haha:   DH got to name him.

09-27-2013 06:23 AM
porcelina

Selissa, I don't think you have to worry about Isaiah for now! LOL!

 

I forgot to add that we named DS1 a top 5 SSA name, and while we have met several other little ones with the same name, none has ever been in his class. I think it is so true that it varies by region and even by neighborhood! We don't regret his name at all -- it was the only one we could agree on at the time! DH is from Latin America so all the names he thinks sound good I don't, and vice versa!

09-27-2013 05:58 AM
Selissa

Ds2's name is Rowan, which I had reservations about because it was at the time a sorta trendy hippy girl name. I knew quite a few toddlers to preschoolers online who were named Rowan.

 

We have only ever met one other Rowan, she was a girl, and Rowan was to young to care. So it turned out to not be a concern.

 

That being said, I am totally a name nerd. If this baby is a boy, we will be naming him Isaiah and I'm not even looking at the rankings, I don't care, I love the name and I have only ever known one or two Isaiah's in my entire life. I like old fashioned boys names so I think it will be fine...

 

 

now i'm curious and i sorta want to look. DANG IT! lol

09-26-2013 05:45 PM
DaisyO
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillysapling View Post
 

Regional popularity is so much more important- but is also very hard to find out, compared to national popularity. You could choose the most popular name and your kid never be in a class with another, or you could choose a fairly uncommon name and your kid knows someone else with it. With as often as people move nowadays, there's really no way of knowing for sure. It really is best to go with a name you like.

 

One of the difficulties for us is that my partner's British and I'm American, so we have different ideas of what names are popular/etc as well as different connotations. My partner's and my name are very uncommon in the UK, but INCREDIBLY common among our generation in the US. My partner chose a name expecting it to be rather uncommon, then got here and ran into so many other people with it! :rotflmao

 

We had a name picked out before we got pregnant. Then in the second trimester my partner decided that it wasn't the right name. shrug.gif 

 

This is very funny.  Where we live, in Maine, we know seriously about 7 girls called Isla.  Then there are a bunch more called Ayla, which sounds nearly identical.  I thought it was so funny when I thought back to the 1990s when there were lots of Kylas and Kaylas.  Anyway, I think "Isla" and "Ayla" must be uncommon overall, but here it is the opposite.  I do think Isla and Ayla are beautiful, but here they are like Jennifer and Jessica for some mysterious reason.

 

Also, we live in the US and gave our daughter a name that is apparently pretty common (in both senses) in England, or so English people tell me.  In the US it is supposed to be very common in South Dakota and Wyoming!  What could that mean?  Cowgirls?  I actually had a hard time with her name until quite recently...my partner chose it, and it took me a looooong time to warm up to (for some reason, although I've always loved names, I didn't put any effort into selecting a name for my only child.  Bizarre.  Big regret).  I am just starting to come around to her name, and she's three.  Let this be a warning to you if you have a partner who insists on his idea of the perfect name. 

 

Whatever, though...I like her name now.  It's her, you know?

09-22-2013 11:14 PM
alaskanmomma I have an Autumn, Sylas, and Calliope. I've only met Autumn's in their 20's and 30's though it always seems to be on people's long list of baby names. Sylas was relatively unheard of when I named him, but thanks to a certain redneck uncle on TV, I've seen it being used more and more. Haven't met another Calliope lol. I've yet to actually in person meet anyone with any of my kids names in their age group, kind of hope it stays that way, but even if they were 1 of 10 in the same class, I'd have no regrets, I love my kids names.
09-21-2013 09:16 AM
barefootmama0709
Quote:
Originally Posted by redheather View Post
 

Yeah, I wonder if being one of many Heather's, especially in the 70s and 80s, is why I chose a very unique name for my DD! At least I wasn't among the multitudes of Lisa's and Jennifer's, but still, when I'm 80 it'll be like the Mildred's of today-- an old lady name haha!

 

I was an 80s kid too-one of many Sarahs! There were 5 or 6 in my graduating HS class. My last name is very common too.

09-21-2013 08:40 AM
sillysapling

Regional popularity is so much more important- but is also very hard to find out, compared to national popularity. You could choose the most popular name and your kid never be in a class with another, or you could choose a fairly uncommon name and your kid knows someone else with it. With as often as people move nowadays, there's really no way of knowing for sure. It really is best to go with a name you like.

 

One of the difficulties for us is that my partner's British and I'm American, so we have different ideas of what names are popular/etc as well as different connotations. My partner's and my name are very uncommon in the UK, but INCREDIBLY common among our generation in the US. My partner chose a name expecting it to be rather uncommon, then got here and ran into so many other people with it! :rotflmao

 

We had a name picked out before we got pregnant. Then in the second trimester my partner decided that it wasn't the right name. shrug.gif 

09-21-2013 03:59 AM
Sphinxy Growing up I didn't know my name was popular, or I suppose more accurately, was becoming popular. There was no one else in my grade with it, and maybe just one or two others that I remember hearing about in other grades near me. Then I went to college. There were quite a few of us. Both my first and second years there I had other people living on my floor with the same name, and senior year in a club of eight, three of us all had the same first name. But it was kind of fun. It didn't bother me. Regionally my college was not far at all from where I grew up, but socioeconomically I suppose it was very different. I can't think of any other common factor that might play into naming (if you read any of the freakonomics books, they talk about this theory). Anyway, now that I'm older and working I'm back to not knowing many people with my name. Popularity clearly increased in the 5-10 years after I was born, so my name is common enough that people can pronounce and spell it, but rare enough among the people in my circle that I still feel a little special about it. Out of an office of 100, I'm the only one with my name.
09-20-2013 10:15 PM
nmelanson

My DS1 is named Kieran. I had never met a male named Kieran, but I grew up with an East-Indian female Kiran in my school. Kieran is an Irish male name meaning "little dark one"; the Indian Kiran means "child of light. I chose it because I felt it had a balance between light/dark, masculine/feminine...

 

   2006 - the year DS1 was born, there were 6 Kierans born in the whole province of British Columbia. Three or four of them ended up being on the little island where I live. One of them ended up being in DS's class in kindergarten and grade one in a school of 35 kids - that was weird!  You can never tell... you can never tell. The best you can do is choose a name that feels good to you. You want take pleasure in saying it. :)

09-20-2013 01:49 PM
EnviroBecca

My son's name is Nicholas.  It was #13 nationwide and #5 in our state the year he was born.  We went ahead with it because he has an unusual last name, and because we liked the name so much.  He has never had more than 1 other Nicholas in any class or group he's been in, and currently he's the only Nicholas in the 3 classes of his grade.  So that's not so bad.  He loves his name, and we feel it suits him very well.

 

My partner and I were working from our experience having very common 1970s names--Rebecca and Daniel.  I managed twice to have roommates named Rebecca, so that was confusing, but I'm Becca while one of them was Becky and the other was always called Rebecca, so that helped.  Our university had an unusually high concentration of Dans (also Kevins) but it wasn't ever a big problem.

 

I feel that the popularity/ordinariness of the last name is an important consideration.  With a last name like Smith or Campbell or Taylor or Chen or Lopez, I would go with a more unusual first name to reduce the likelihood of meeting someone with the same first AND last name.  (You might laugh at the ethnic examples, but seriously, there were two Kevin J. Chens in my university at the same time, and they had a registration mixup such that the Kevin who was my friend was scheduled for a double courseload!)

09-20-2013 11:26 AM
mareseatoats I do think the popularity charts can be misleading. I haven't met any Liams in a long time but just met two Arthurs in as many days. I see Clara bring picked in all the due date discussions, but never meet one in real life.
09-20-2013 09:19 AM
SweetSilver
Quote:
Originally Posted by redheather View Post
 

Yeah, I wonder if being one of many Heather's, especially in the 70s and 80s, is why I chose a very unique name for my DD! At least I wasn't among the multitudes of Lisa's and Jennifer's, but still, when I'm 80 it'll be like the Mildred's of today-- an old lady name haha!

 

There were 4 Lisa Marie-s in my 6th grade class (girls born late '68-'1969).  Heather, Jennifer, Melissa.... Julie..... you never hear Julie anymore.  I hardly ever met a "Sarah" growing up (though not unheard of-- and the ones I met were spelled "Sara").  Until I moved to Seattle, with it's considerable Jewish population.  I met a dozen of "Sarah"s through the family I rented a room from, plus many more friends afterwards that weren't Jewish.  Very odd regionalism....

 
What I see are dozens of variations on the same names.  I wonder if you combined all possible spellings for one name pronunciation, how the popularity chart would look?  And not that it makes a difference in classes, but I see a big divide between parents my age that got a late start, and younger parents with kids the same age.  The 40+ moms seem to be giving more classical names (and classically spelled names) and the younger ones I meet *tend* towards creative spellings and non-traditional names (that sound beautiful, but are spelled atrociously IMO!)
 
OP, lovely name, and I hope she likes it.  *That* you can never predict!  They might like it (or hate it) because no one has it, or because it's popular.  There is no predicting it, is there?
 
I never minded or loved my name.  My girls enjoy their names, chosen partly for their meaning, and enjoy meeting other girls with the same name.  "Georgia" is more popular here for girls than "Sylvia", and most Sylvia-s I meet are older women-- the name was very popular for women of a certain age.  I only wish I'd given G a different middle name.  I still like what I chose, but ache for the name that I passed by, partly due to other key people not liking it.  G knows this name, and if she likes it that much, she can take it when she's older.  Both girls like hearing what they might have been named.  [My heart still leaps when I meet other "Gretchen"s (my beloved kindy teacher was Gretchen Leaf)]
 
I don't know that Mildred will be that far behind.  I am already hearing Estelle, Edith, Ethel, Myrtle.... 
09-19-2013 10:08 PM
fightintxaggie98

I wouldn't consider a popular name because I knew I'd regret it. My kid's name hasn't been in the top 1000 at any point in the last 133 years. (I only know because I searched the SSA list after seeing it mentioned here. I didn't pine over it beforehand.)

09-19-2013 07:42 PM
erigeron

That is exactly why I am in favor of names that are at least somewhat common. I've spent all my life with a last name I always have to repronounce and spell (maiden and married are both difficult). My kids will already have one name that everyone has trouble with; I don't want to inflict them with two. If I'd married my college boyfriend whose last name was Baker, I might feel differently. 

09-19-2013 04:31 PM
porcelina
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleCapucine View Post

Hey, you know - there is relaxation and peace in a familiar name. I have a very unusual name, and I do not consider it a gift, nor a common name a drag. A rare name must be spelled out and pronounced at every introduction, and often the story too. A familiar name causes not even a ripple, which most of the time is perfect - never misspelled, never cause for pause. Your child will belong to her time, which is beautiful. If she is meant to be distinguished in a crowd, let her personality create that reality! Best of luck to you in your delivery and name list-making.

This is a good point. When I was little, my name was extremely uncommon. Strangers would ask me my name (like grocery market checker, etc., when with my mom), and then would not understand, or would misunderstand for a similar name, and I had to constantly repeat or correct them (which I hated; I was shy). Then my name hit the charts in the 80s and it was no longer a problem! I still don't like it, though, mainly because it is very difficult to pronounce in other languages.

09-19-2013 04:22 PM
ocelotmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irielyn View Post
 

To this the day I still dont like my name and dont feel like a Jessica and am even considering changing my name. I told myself long ago that when I had kids they would have names like no other name out there and that their names would have a special meaning dear to my heart. Just my 2 cents!

I don't really feel like a Jessica either, but I have no idea what I'd change it to. Jess is ok, and seems to be what people naturally end up calling me, even though I don't introduce myself that way.

09-19-2013 01:57 PM
ashleybess

Isabella and Samantha are both beautiful names in themselves, but the popularity would be a huge deterrent for me. Both my children have uncommon names - my daughter's name isn't even on the SSA radar at all and my son's is in the 200s. My name is Ashley and I absolutely HATED being among so many other Ashleys in school - I always longed for a name that was meaningful and unusual.

09-19-2013 12:52 PM
LittleCapucine Hey, you know - there is relaxation and peace in a familiar name. I have a very unusual name, and I do not consider it a gift, nor a common name a drag. A rare name must be spelled out and pronounced at every introduction, and often the story too. A familiar name causes not even a ripple, which most of the time is perfect - never misspelled, never cause for pause. Your child will belong to her time, which is beautiful. If she is meant to be distinguished in a crowd, let her personality create that reality! Best of luck to you in your delivery and name list-making.
09-19-2013 12:10 PM
redheather

Yeah, I wonder if being one of many Heather's, especially in the 70s and 80s, is why I chose a very unique name for my DD! At least I wasn't among the multitudes of Lisa's and Jennifer's, but still, when I'm 80 it'll be like the Mildred's of today-- an old lady name haha!

09-19-2013 10:28 AM
Irielyn

I have to agree with Philothea....I too grew up with the most popular name ever(Jessica), every where I went there were others and I ended up being given a nickname also which I hated. When asked why my parents named me Jessica they told me they thought it was pretty. If I were named after someone in my family or a song perhaps I might have liked my name more but no, they were 9 other Jessicas in the nursery when I was born and they thought it was "pretty". To this the day I still dont like my name and dont feel like a Jessica and am even considering changing my name. I told myself long ago that when I had kids they would have names like no other name out there and that their names would have a special meaning dear to my heart. Just my 2 cents!

09-18-2013 05:51 PM
sniffmommy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Wiggins View Post
 

 AND i found out there is another Ocean Tigerlily! what are the odds!

 

Seriously!  What are the odds!?!

Those are great names.  I picked out a couple of names for my kids when I was a teenager, and then Paris Hilton got popular, and I had to trash that choice. 
09-16-2013 08:07 PM
Lou Wiggins

My name is Lauren. when i was in school there were like 5 other laurens around me all the time so when i had my first i wanted a unique name. DH and me couldnt decide until i read a certain comic book run we both decided on Harvey. It means Battle Ready. So ofcourse we had to pair it with something equally awesome. He's Harvey Tomahawk. Then we wanted to keep running with the weapon names and were planning out names well before actually planning on another child. we wanted Lolita Machete for a girl. It just sounded so cute. Ended up getting a black lab/pit mix and naming her Machete instead. Then years later we had our DD and named her Ocean Tigerlily. Thought both were pretty unique names and they wouldnt run into others with the same these days. I have been meeting many other Harveys lately and DD is only 8 months old and already have met 3 other girls named Ocean. Its funny what goes around. AND i found out there is another Ocean Tigerlily! what are the odds!

09-16-2013 05:09 PM
Viola
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lidamama84 View Post

Haha, I HATE when I hear a pet called by a person name, especially a name I like!! eyesroll.gif

 

My daughter's name is a popular dog name, although we also had a cat with the name when I was growing up, which is in part why I decided why I liked it.


Bella is a very popular name for dogs in my neighborhood.  Sometimes I think people pick names for their dogs that they like and might want to give to a child. Our gerbils had human names like Paul and Sadie, and then we had one we called Bitey because he would bite you when you picked him up.  But the gerbils didn't get outside, so no one really had to know what names they were.  But for my dog, I decided to give her a name that most people wouldn't name a child.  She is named Dandelion.  We did consider Daisy, but I know that has grown in popularity for children, so we picked Dandelion and call her Dandy.

My name is actually now more popular for dogs than people.  My daughter said the other day that there are no children with my name, just kids' moms.  My named peaked in popularity in the mid-70s, about 9 or 10 years after I was born.
09-16-2013 04:43 PM
Viola
Quote:
Originally Posted by devilish View Post
 

Some people *cough* me *cough* chose the name of their children LONG before they've even conceived. (I had DD1's name picked out since I was 12. I was 30 when I had her.)

 

So I picked names for my 4 children when I was 7,  and they didn't end up with those names.  When I was 11, I picked a different name for a future daughter.  My husband likes almost no names, and I didn't like the couple that he liked, so he picked one that was similar, and it turned out it was the name I chose for a daughter when I was 11--which was in the 70's, btw!  

 

Yep, my daughter was born in the 90's and I picked her name out 22 years before she was born.

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