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Thread: when did you discover your child had an eye problem? and what was done? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-20-2014 03:52 PM
Linda on the move
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazytownmama View Post
 

 

As far as school goes... I really don't know what to expect, but you hear lots of "i pulled my kid from school because they woudln't do x,y.z when you homeschool...  and I don't really know any ps parents irl to combat that...  so thanks!!! :)

I

 

I understand. We homeschooled until the kids were 10 and 12, so I heard lots and lots of those stories.  But when my kids did start school, they had awesome teachers. My older DD is on the autism spectrum, and we were very fortunate to have WONDERFUL school staff who were totally willing to work with her. I now work in a school that works very hard to meet the needs of special needs students (and I enjoy being part of that team).

 

Schools aren't experts at eyes. When we have a student with a suspected vision problem, we hook the parents up with information about how to access free eye exams, and we've even helped arrange transportation when that was an issue. But in spite of a range of specialists at our school, no one can figure out a kid's eyes.

 

When you meet with the school, I would be clear, provide documentation, but be non-confrontational. Remember that you are the school are going to be a team in your child's education, not adversaries. They want him to succeed.

03-20-2014 02:17 PM
Polliwog My DD actually does see double without her glasses, so don't rule it out.
03-20-2014 10:37 AM
crazytownmama

We go back next Tuesday for a more in depth test to figure out what his issues really are (although he's now using it as a get out of jail free card...oooh, i can't see that, i see double that...etc...so I hope they are able to call him on his BS and figure out whats actually going on...  sigh... So I'll know more of what we're actually dealing with then...

As far as school goes... I really don't know what to expect, but you hear lots of "i pulled my kid from school because they woudln't do x,y.z when you homeschool...  and I don't really know any ps parents irl to combat that...  so thanks!!! :)

I

03-19-2014 06:01 AM
Polliwog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post


My kids don't have vision issues, but I work with special needs students at a school. Continue with your testing and learning all you can about your son's eyes. Take the information to the school, including any specific recommendations from the optometrist.

What are fearing fighting about? Is there an accommodation that you plan to ask for that you think they will say "no" about? 

Chances are, your son will be put in "response to intervention" when he starts school for reading. This is a research based, small group instruction lead by a teacher with advanced training in teaching reading. It is a common program, and most schools have it. Chances are, they will want to see how he responds to reading intervention before doing anything else.

I homeschooled my kids when they were young, and then they started school when the time felt right. It was scary, but in the end, a really positive thing for them good. Good luck!
I agree. I doubt you will have to fight for anything. Schools generally want children to be successful.
03-19-2014 03:22 AM
lauren

I'm another whose son had eye challenges, with the eyes not working together. It was discovered around 3rd grade. He wore glasses for a couple of years and the problem was corrected. The school worked cooperatively with us, but no changes were really required in terms of instruction or curriculum. Hopefully all will work well for you both!!

03-18-2014 09:04 PM
Linda on the move
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazytownmama View Post
 

Hi Moms,

 we have to go back for more testing before they recommend how we fix it, but his eyes don't work together to process info in book-reading range... which is probably why he's still not reading fluently or easily...) ....., did you have to fight the schools about it, if they offered any special services/accomodations for it... 

 

 

My kids don't have vision issues, but I work with special needs students at a school. Continue with your testing and learning all you can about your son's eyes. Take the information to the school, including any specific recommendations from the optometrist.

 

What are fearing fighting about? Is there an accommodation that you plan to ask for that you think they will say "no" about? 

 

Chances are, your son will be put in "response to intervention" when he starts school for reading. This is a research based, small group instruction lead by a teacher with advanced training in teaching reading. It is a common program, and most schools have it. Chances are, they will want to see how he responds to reading intervention before doing anything else.

 

I homeschooled my kids when they were young, and then they started school when the time felt right. It was scary, but in the end, a really positive thing for them good. Good luck!

03-17-2014 10:01 PM
squimp I think it really depends what the problem is, and whether it is easily resolved. My DD has strabismus, and has been wearing bifocals since she was 3. So pretty severe vision issues and she really cannot see without her glasses. But her vision issues are completely corrected with glasses and she reads at a high school level in 4th grade.

It sounds like your child may have a different kind of vision issue, for example a processing issue, that may not be simply resolved with glasses and would not have been detected by the normal eye chart type tests done at our public school. We looked into vision therapy with an optometrist known for success with this approach in our area. She felt like our DD would not benefit from vision therapy, but we know a number of other kids who have. Has your child has a thorough eye exam by a ped ophthalmologist or optometrist who is really experienced with kids? That could help you get off on the right foot.
03-15-2014 12:16 PM
grumpybear

DS' school (and I assume every school in the school district) does vision and hearing checks for the ALL kids regularly. I am fairly sure they accommodate those special needs. Why check otherwise, right?

 

On top of that, anytime a student is referred to an intervention team (not necessarily special ed yet but may need specific interventions in specific areas), they do the checks again.

 

I haven't had a problem with our school with my requests for accommodations/extensions.

03-15-2014 01:41 AM
Nightwish My ds has 20/20 vision, but his eyes also don't work together (he has strabismus).
Actually it was his kindergarten teacher who helped us identify the problem, as she recommended all the kids get their eyes and hearing checked. This is how we discovered ds needed glasses.
We put him in glasses and he is doing great in school. He is one of the best students in his class.
He doesn't need any special accommodations.
03-14-2014 07:36 AM
Red Pajama

Mine don't have this problem, but I have an acquaintence whose daughter has a similar problem. They discovered it because she wasn't reading well by late elementary.

 

As a teacher, I had a student in my class (6th grade) where the parent took him for additinal testing, as he was having academic struggles. He came to school with colored overlays for his books, and colored paper for us to copy his worksheets on to. It wasn't a big deal to accomodate. 

03-14-2014 05:55 AM
crazytownmama

Hi Moms,

I hope its ok I'm posting here.  We homeschool, but just found out my 8 year old has an eye issue (he has 20/20 vision -- we have to go back for more testing before they recommend how we fix it, but his eyes don't work together to process info in book-reading range... which is probably why he's still not reading fluently or easily...)  He's probably going into the public school system next year...

 

I'm looking for stories of public schoolers with similar problems -- how was it discovered, did you have to fight the schools about it, if they offered any special services/accomodations for it...   (I'm both feeling guilty for not discovering it sooner, and worried about how he'll do next year...i know all schools are different, but i'd love to hear your childs story, if you don't mind sharing...)

 

thanks!!


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