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04-29-2014 10:48 PM
One_Girl I think they repeat them yearly but you'd have to check with the school to be sure. It isn't something so extensive you'd have to reschedule a visit for if you do it at the doctors office though. They stand twenty feet back from the eye chart, cover one eye, and read the letters then switch eyes. Hearing is with headphones and they listen for four tones in each ear unless your doctor or district uses the tuning fork thing then they do it a few times behind the kid and have them raise a hand on the side they heard the noise on. It takes maybe two minutes for both in the office and longer at school only because you have to walk from the room the eye test is in to the room the hearing one is in. I'm sure your school allows the option to opt out if you aren't comfortable with the it.
04-29-2014 10:09 PM
newmum35

Sorry I haven't been back on in so long.. No I haven't yet looked for that handbook yet. I had not read the entire thing from cover to cover, so its possible it might have been in there... I did look through it for quite a while when I first got it but it was so thick there was no way I could read every page, so I placed it aside to read when I had more time.. oh well.. its here somewhere... When I locate it I will check for sure. But that would have been given to us nearly a year before his screenings, as registration was last May I believe, and his screenings in March so I've had the handbook for a LONG time..

 

We do get calendars with info about certain days, and someone mentioned it could have been on the calendar. Thats a good idea, it should have been. I hadn't thought of that... So I just double checked my calendars, because I keep them all on the frig and when we get a new one I just clip it over the old so I have them going way back.

 

So I went back over the past few calendars to Feb and there is nothing on there about eye & hearing exams.  They did put on dental exam days and the physicals. Additionally we got notices of those on separate papers sent home in advance to sign & turn in.  But it seems they skipped the eye & hearing notices completely.  I totally get its merely a screening an not a comprehensive eye exam like at the eye dr. The papers at his preschool explained that, because he had the eye screening at preschool which was handled perfectly I thought.

 

 If my kid hadn't been verbal letting me know about it, I wouldn't have known. He just had the physical at his ped. this month because we had opted out of that at the school, preferring to take him to the same ped. who has seen him since birth. And his ped told me they offered (cooincidentally & for the first time) hearing & vision testing and I asked if it was more comprehensive or the same kind that he had just been given at his school, and they said it was the same. I told them he had just had that at school so they said there was no need to retake it and they just took my word for it, cause I had no papers or anything to show for it.

 

So I feel fortunate he happened to tell me about his day on that particular day otherwise he would have retaken the same testing at his dr. because I would have said yes. I am not sure if they would have doen it right then and there or set up a separate appt on another day, but we live half hr away so that would have taken up part of another day, another appt and more copay. And what if the other scenerio... what if we had happened to go to our ped in Feb instead (prior to his testing in school) and the ped offered those to us, I would have said yes, and he would have taken both of those.. and then he would have had the same ones again in school right after that.  It is very likely that could have happened because he was overdue for his yearly physical this year.

Having them do the screenings right at the school on registration day is also a good idea. That does seem even better in timing, or at least they could have held them in the first few months of the school year to make sure all kids could see & hear ok.

 

He gets papers sent home from school every day, between 2-6 every day and I read through them all. A couple are his own worksheets and the rest are flyers for parents about other stuff and partial sheets/notices so I don't think it was to "cut down" on any amount of stuff they send home because it would not have taken up any info to put on the monthly calendar if nothing else. I just can't think of why everythin else under the sun is on the calendar (& sent home) but not this, unless it was intentional for some reason, but I can't think of why that might be. So I'm going to assume someone just completely overlooked this at our school this year by mistake especially since someone here said they usually get notices sent home but not this year. So maybe same thing happened to us.

 

I hadn't thought of sending a note to principal letting them know it would be nice to get a notice of the hearing/vision screening...  I would hope this was a one-time mistake, and they had sent notices home in prior years but in the event its not I am thinking of sending a short email maybe thats a good idea. I did write a note to his teacher right after he told me that, letting her know I hadn't gotten any notice of the testing (thinking maybe she forgot to put one in his folder by mistake) and I asked if we would be getting results back.  She wrote back, that no notices were sent home, and she inquired of the nurse about his results, and told me he passed.  So then I felt guilty that I knew he had been screened, and knew the results, when none of the other parents did  lol

 

Ok now question... is this something they will repeat each year in school so that he is screened again in 1st, 2nd, etc.. or a one time thing only in K?

04-13-2014 12:32 PM
moominmamma
Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyGG View Post
 

They would have sent a note home saying that they'd noted a potential issue at a routine screening and recommend that you take your child to the eye doctor for an exam.  In that way this really isn't that much different than a teacher writing an email home that she's worried that your child seems to be having trouble seeing the board and recommending that you seek qualified medical advice to determine if there is a real problem, the exact nature of the problem, and a solution. 

 

Yes, this exactly. That's why I wouldn't consider this "medical care," just an appropriate part of gaining a holistic view of a child's educational readiness. 

 

Miranda

04-13-2014 11:14 AM
JollyGG
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmum35 View Post
 

 

See the way I think, is that vision & hearing testing is not "educational" but "medical" and so I am thinking when I send my kid to school they are there to be "learning" and not having medical procedures done (however non-invasive those are) unless I was notified and have approved it. I totally get that hearing/vision are crucial to learning, so having that be state mandated, is not a problem.. I agree with it.. I just don't understand why only the dental/physical papers got sent home (for signing, or not- you can take kid to own dr if desired) but not the eye&ears.  Somewhat confused, and a bit peeved. I'd like to know what kind of medical testing is planned for my kid while they are in school (and when that is scheduled for.. and the results of that) even if its not considered to be "invasive." I just wasn't sure if this happened everywhere or if others in other schools (whether same state or different) also did not get notified.

 

I just had an eye exam myself.. by an eye doctor... I didn't go to a school to get it done, I was seen by an eye dr at a vision center.  I consider vision testing to fit in more with "medical"  than "educational"  thus, I'd have liked to been notified and asked permission for it since it was done in school, by the school (or whomever, I really don't know who did it now).  Maybe I think differently than most, maybe I'm in the minority here.. to me, the eyes and ears are just as important medically, as the teeth and the rest of the body.   Oh well, it wasn't a huge deal to be honest, just more of a pet peeve type of thing.. If he hadn't bothered to tell me about it, I am quite sure I would have never known that he had been tested, or that he passed.   At least in his preschool, we got prior notification it was going to take place, and then afterwards, we got the results. They only did vision there, no hearing.

However the screening your child got at school is not the same thing you received at the eye doctor. There's a reason they refer to it as  a screening, and not an exam. They aren't diagnosing anything. If there had been a problem noted at the school they wouldn't have prescribed glasses or anything. They would have sent a note home saying that they'd noted a potential issue at a routine screening and recommend that you take your child to the eye doctor for an exam.  In that way this really isn't that much different than a teacher writing an email home that she's worried that your child seems to be having trouble seeing the board and recommending that you seek qualified medical advice to determine if there is a real problem, the exact nature of the problem, and a solution. 

 

The reason you didn't get a not saying he'd passed, was likely because a pass on a screening does not mean that there aren't issues. It just means that they didn't see any problems on a very basic vision screening. They don't want to be in the position of saying your child's vision is fine as that's not what the screening is designed for. The job of the screening is simply to identify those students who need an eye exam. 

04-13-2014 11:03 AM
KSLaura Our school begs for volunteers to help with screenings, so we usually know they are coming up. I've never seen any results, so I assume my kids can see and hear ok. smile.gif
04-09-2014 07:22 AM
columbusmomma

As a school nurse/RN we do vision, hearing, and other screenings on students. We send home a form letting parents know the children will be screened and then after the screening the results are sent home confidentially to the family. As nurses we also do bp,check ht/wt,etc. I think the screenings are important, and some are mandated by law, as they find potential vision and hearing problems and sometimes for the first time. In our district only the school nurse does the screenings. A parent may opt out of course. I have found that as a school nurse I am sometimes the child's only healthcare professional at times or the person who can provide the family with support and resources for healthcare.

04-03-2014 05:35 PM
IdentityCrisisMama
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post

IME, most differences I've had with school officials have turned out to be a lot more minor than I thought they would be. Open cmmunication and diplomacy have been my best friends. smile.gif

This!  

 

I could add that my first approach is to just ask for information about whatever it is that I'm concerned with. I don't think that I've ever had to take it past that because every time I get a full picture of something, I realize that I think my DC's school has made a good choice. 

04-03-2014 05:07 PM
Turquesa
Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpybear View Post

@Turquesa
 - see above. Bolding mine


And I mention school handbook because that is where ours is in. It's before the last page where you get to sign that you read through it. All waivers are there too.

Yes, I caught that and responded that in my second sentence. It sounds like she had a huge handbook, and I don't think that health screening announcements should be buried deeply in there. Some schools may have thin handbooks, others have thick ones, and we don't have one at all.

I'm OK agreeing to disagree, though. ICM nailed it in that last sentence of her post; I don't think anyone would take issue with the OP asking to be notified.. The OP's school should get the benefit of the doubt. I'm sure they aren't doing anything deliberate or nefarious. They may not know it's an issue, and they maybe haven't been approached about it by a parent. I think a simple, tactful email to the teacher and principle, (and school nurse, if there is one), would be a good start. Just ask if there would be a way to let parents know in advance, (in a more accessible way than a giant handbook, if it's even in there), because you would like to be in close communication and collaboration on matters pertaining to her health. (It also helps keep her doctor or other primary care provider up to speed!) One PP alluded to parent volunteers, so you could even close by offering to help out at the screenings.

IME, most differences I've had with school officials have turned out to be a lot more minor than I thought they would be. Open communication and diplomacy have been my best friends. smile.gif
04-03-2014 04:14 PM
IdentityCrisisMama

I hope that my response didn't feel unsupportive to the OP.  Where I was coming from is just my long-view of school-parent communication. While it may seem pretty clear cut to some of us, I don't think that's the case for schools and, instead, I think they really grapple with providing JUST the right amount of communication so that they reach the maximum number of parents with the most vital information. 

 

 

I know that to the OP and a few others that this feels like the "vital stuff".  But I think schools are in a tough spot in terms of figuring this out for parents and I know that I appreciate that a school edits some information so that we are not constantly wading through information. Personally, I'd much rather read about the chrysalis about to hatch in the back garden or the duck laying eggs in the flower pot. And I love to hear a little story about my own DC from time to time. 

 

I know *for sure* that there is just lots and lots and lots of stuff that the school could share and I won't always agree with what other parents want to hear about, and sometimes I won't always agree with what the school chooses to share. 

 

But, really, if there was something that I really wish I knew about, I would totally feel comfortable asking the school to consider letting parents know about this or that.  

04-03-2014 02:39 PM
grumpybear

No dates. But I believe the OP wasn't lamenting about that. It was that she felt she wasn't informed at all.

04-03-2014 02:19 PM
LiLStar

Does it include the dates? thats nice if it does, but I still stand that it is completely reasonable to put a sentence in a monthly/weekly newsletter, or a couple words on a calender square, if one goes home with students. I have no idea whether its mentioned in our handbook. But if I'm reading through the handbook and it mentions dates of any school events, activities, picture days, hearing/vision screenings, any of that, I promise you that if its more than a couple weeks in the future, I'm going to completely gloss over it and assume that this information that I'm seeing about something that is potentially several months in the future, is not presently relevant and surely there will be notification closer to the date. 

 

eta: I just checked the handbook. It mentions what screenings are offered and for which grades. It says nothing about dates. 

04-03-2014 02:07 PM
grumpybear
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiLStar View Post
 

 

 

I'm with Turquesa on this one. I'm not okay with the school having health information about my child that I don't have. Its not something I'm going to make my hill to die on or anything, but it is a SMALL thing to notify parents a few days before, so why not just do it?

because in our case, we were notified via the school handbook. The one whose last page we were supposed to sign that we have read it thoroughly and submit to the school sometime the first week of class. Maybe it's the same with the OP? Or not. I don't know.

OP, have you read the handbook?

04-03-2014 01:18 PM
LiLStar

I have no problem with hearing/vision screenings at school. I think they're great and I'm glad they're available, and I'm happy for my kids to participate. I still think its worth a mention to parents. We get a weekly newsletter from the teacher telling us what they've been doing in class, about any special assignments parents will need to help with, important upcoming events, science fairs, that kind of stuff. A simple, "next Thursday we will be having a vision screening. If you have any questions or want to opt out, contact the school nurse" would be nice, tacked to the end of the newsletter. My daughter also is provided with a calendar page each month to keep in her folder. "hearing screening" would fit nicely on that calender. I'm not suggesting waste a sheet of paper to send home a notice, but it's nice for the information to be put out there where its visible. 

 

Some points that haven't been mentioned:

What if a child is absent on the day of the screening, and the parents would really like them to be screened? It could be an "avoidable absence" (we decided to take friday off for a weekend trip, but could have decided on next friday instead if we knew there was something important going on at school) or even if it was an unavoidable sick day, if they knew it was missed, they might choose to schedule an appt themselves with their own dr to make up for it. 

 

Or, what if I decided to, independently, pay for a vision exam through an optometrist? Around here that's a good $80 out of pocket. I'd be pretty irritated if I paid for that and during the exam my kid said, "oh yeah, this is just like what we did at school a couple weeks ago!" 

 

I'm with Turquesa on this one. I'm not okay with the school having health information about my child that I don't have. Its not something I'm going to make my hill to die on or anything, but it is a SMALL thing to notify parents a few days before, so why not just do it?

04-03-2014 11:53 AM
grumpybear
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmum35 View Post
 

 I think we did get one at spring registration, its about an inch thick, and I skimmed it at the time. I meant to read it all over the summer before K, but never did. IT was a LOT to read.. I have it here somewhere... oh well :)  I'll find it sometime and read it, for sure :) Maybe it is in there..

@Turquesa - see above. Bolding mine

 

 

And I mention school handbook because that is where ours is in. It's before the last page where you get to sign that you read through it. All waivers are there too.

04-03-2014 08:15 AM
Turquesa
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Here, parents are notified if anything shows up in the screening, and they are given information about where they can access services for free or reduced rates if needed.



It absolutely isn't the case that anything is kept from parents .



However , saying "your child looked at letters today and could see them just fine" is redundant. You can assume your child does that every single day they go to school.

 



You can assume that??? Even though you said you had poor vision yourself, are you aware of how many small children think that their hearing and vision are "normal" because that's all that they've ever known? headscratch.gif Yea, I'm still with the OP on this one.
04-03-2014 08:13 AM
Turquesa The OP said that she was sent home with "a gazillion papers," but there was nothing about her "just skimming them." On the contrary, it sounds like she read through them pretty carefully. She did skim through the school handbook, but paperwork like that shouldn't be buried in hundreds of pages where parents have to mine for it.

A doctor would tell me s/he tested my child and everything turned out A-OK. Schools need to be at least this transparent.

OP, testing was done right in front of DH at registration, so he knew what was being done and learned on the spot that her eyes and hearing were fine.
04-02-2014 09:32 PM
grumpybear Sorry I keep referring to the school handbook but in ours, it also states that we don't get notified if the screening shows up normal.

I know that the OP's issue is that she wasn't informed but she has also stated that she just skimmed the stack of papers given to her.

If it is indeed in the stack of papers, then this whole discussion is moot, no?
04-02-2014 09:17 PM
34me I can't believe no one gets the constant e-mails asking for parent volunteers to help with the hearing and vision screenings ;-). That's how I know it's that time of year again and to expect the letter in the mail in about a month that my kid has failed his hearing screen. Again.

We only find out the results if there are issues. We never get a note saying congrats your kid has 20/10 vision! Just sorry, you should call the district audiologist for a more comprehensive screening....
04-02-2014 07:43 PM
Linda on the move Here, parents are notified if anything shows up in the screening, and they are given information about where they can access services for free or reduced rates if needed.

It absolutely isn't the case that anything is kept from parents .

However , saying "your child looked at letters today and could see them just fine" is redundant. You can assume your child does that every single day they go to school.
04-02-2014 07:10 PM
Turquesa Well, I'll swim against the tide and disagree with the majority in this thread. hide.gif

Even though these tests are non-invasive and bear no risk, and even though I have no problem consenting, I don't find it right that a school knows my child's health status and I don't. It seems strange that school officials would want this in their own records and yet keep parents in the dark about it.

If DD gets her eyes tested, I want to know that she had the test AND what the results were. My child's health--good or bad--is very much my business.

Also, if she needs glasses years from now, I'd like an idea of when the problem began. Finally, I'd like to know whether or NOT the school is doing these screenings so that I know if I should ask for them instead at her doctor appointments. I have to request them for my homeschooled child.

Yea that's me. Always the devil's advocate. FIREdevil.gif
04-02-2014 01:06 PM
grumpybear

I just re-read our student handbook and it's there. It's mandated by the state for schools to do so. An opt-out form is also provided in the handbook.

 

Did you end up revisiting your handbook?

04-02-2014 12:40 PM
newmum35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippy918 View Post

From what I heard, the tests are mandated by the states and start at age 4. We got screening forms sent home from daycare, but since we had to pay for that, I had the doctor fax in the results from his well check. I'm guessing the screenings are no cost in the public school, but in your case they should have sent some sort of notification that testing is on such and such day and parents will get results in X amount of weeks.

 

Yep, this. This was the reason for my original post :)  Lot of misunderstanding with some of the comments. Glad a couple people got it. No notifications sent home, either prior to testing, or, after testing. Just think that is odd.  I understand its non-invasive... totally get that. Still, it falls under medical testing, in my opinion.

04-01-2014 04:48 PM
Skippy918 From what I heard, the tests are mandated by the states and start at age 4. We got screening forms sent home from daycare, but since we had to pay for that, I had the doctor fax in the results from his well check. I'm guessing the screenings are no cost in the public school, but in your case they should have sent some sort of notification that testing is on such and such day and parents will get results in X amount of weeks.
03-27-2014 07:25 PM
Linda on the move

I'm grateful that the school I attended back in 1972 did these because it is how it was discovered that I needed glasses (which had a massive impact on my life)!

 

 

If you really have a big problem with your child looking at a piece of paper and saying that they see, or listening to something and letting someone know what they hear, then school isn't the best place for them. Kids do it all day long.

 

 

Although these screenings are pointless for lots of kids, they do help out some kids a great deal, and I was one of those kids!

03-27-2014 01:14 PM
squimp I believe our public school system does it as a community service. It is not an invasive procedure, but does give parents a heads up if there is a problem. Our ped does not do routine eye exams or hearing exams, believe it or not, so I really do think it is helpful. Many kids may not go to the doctor every year nor get eye exams every year. I can understand wanting to be notified but I really think it is a good thing, especially in our school which does not have a school nurse.
03-27-2014 12:13 PM
One_Girl Our schools have always done eye, hearing, and speech screenings for everybody and just sent notes home if there is a problem. It's just a quick screener to identify the need for a more in depth referral but they are helpful. My brother's hearing loss was found this way when he was little despite frequent checkups from pediatricians so I am all for having them.
03-27-2014 10:43 AM
blessedwithboys
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmum35 View Post
 

 

See the way I think, is that vision & hearing testing is not "educational" but "medical" and so I am thinking when I send my kid to school they are there to be "learning" and not having medical procedures done (however non-invasive those are) unless I was notified and have approved it. I totally get that hearing/vision are crucial to learning, so having that be state mandated, is not a problem.. I agree with it.. I just don't understand why only the dental/physical papers got sent home (for signing, or not- you can take kid to own dr if desired) but not the eye&ears.  Somewhat confused, and a bit peeved. I'd like to know what kind of medical testing is planned for my kid while they are in school (and when that is scheduled for.. and the results of that) even if its not considered to be "invasive." I just wasn't sure if this happened everywhere or if others in other schools (whether same state or different) also did not get notified.

 

I just had an eye exam myself.. by an eye doctor... I didn't go to a school to get it done, I was seen by an eye dr at a vision center.  I consider vision testing to fit in more with "medical"  than "educational"  thus, I'd have liked to been notified and asked permission for it since it was done in school, by the school (or whomever, I really don't know who did it now).  Maybe I think differently than most, maybe I'm in the minority here.. to me, the eyes and ears are just as important medically, as the teeth and the rest of the body.   Oh well, it wasn't a huge deal to be honest, just more of a pet peeve type of thing.. If he hadn't bothered to tell me about it, I am quite sure I would have never known that he had been tested, or that he passed.   At least in his preschool, we got prior notification it was going to take place, and then afterwards, we got the results. They only did vision there, no hearing.

 

this is how i feel

03-27-2014 04:54 AM
IdentityCrisisMama

I'm with Miranda on this one in that hearing and vision would fall in the category of educational testing in my mind. And, because it's totally non-invasive, it doesn't seem like something that schools need to communicate home about. 

 

I also agree with the PPs who suggest looking through all the paperwork before putting too much energy into being upset about not being notified. It's possible that it's listed on the district website, calendar, or, yea, buried in that massive booklet that no one reads. 

 

My experience with schools is that they are in a tough spot in terms of communication. Parents get overloaded with the massive amount of stuff to keep track of and schools have to make some tough calls about how and what to communicate to parents so that everyone feels informed. I'd prefer a "less is more" approach myself. 

03-26-2014 10:05 PM
moominmamma
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmum35 View Post
 

 

See the way I think, is that vision & hearing testing is not "educational" but "medical" 

 

And the way I think, I'm grateful if the school is looking at things holistically and sees, for example, that a kid who needs to be disciplined for misbehaving during math is hungry, or frustrated by his fine-motor delays, or upset because of a bullying incident at recess. None of which, not even the discipline, is strictly educational any more than a hearing test. Understanding the whole picture and how it contributes to children's learning is what good schools do, imo. Just my perspective, though.

 

Miranda

03-26-2014 09:51 PM
squimp Our school does health screening which includes vision and then a separate hearing screening. I know it is helpful to some parents, they may not have known about some of their kids' issues beforehand. Sometimes we get a message about the screenings we know it is happening, just like we do about other tests. But we didn't this year and it doesn't bother me. My DD wears glasses and goes to the eye doctor anyway so the vision test is fairly useless for us.
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