Removing chipping lead paint/ "Natural" house paint? - Mothering Forums
 
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#1 of 16 Old 05-13-2004, 08:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We just bought a house! One bad thing is that there is some chipping lead paint in the kitchen. So before we move in, we need to remedy that situation. The house inspector suggested that we use a wet sponge or cloth, and scrape as much of the chips off as possible (while keeping it all really wet). Then paint over it.



So two questions. Has anyone ever cleaned up chipping lead paint? If so, how did you do it. And has anyone ever used "natural" house paint? Last I checked Real Goods sold it, but I don't know of anyone who has actually tried it. It's super expensive so I want to hear opinions of anyone that may have tried it. How bad are the fumes, does the paint last, etc.



Thanks



Lauren
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#2 of 16 Old 05-13-2004, 08:19 PM
 
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I've read that keeping the surface wet so that lead filled dust doesn't enter your lungs is necessary - but that it's best to paint a primer over the lead paint & then put on the topcoat of wall paint.

I've used Sherwin-Williams "Harmony" line before with great results. I painted a nursey of a baby who was born preemie & had a trach at the time. The paint went on very nicely, even decorative painting went smoothly with it. The baby showed no signs of breathing difficulties & the mother said that the rooms didn't smell that same night. (Harmony is a zero-VOC {volatile organic compound} paints.)

I'm copy/pasting some safe-paint, low VOC or zero VOC, info that I have on file below. It's loong, but really good info...


Tips
Indoor air is three times more polluted than outdoor air, and according to the EPA, is considered to be one of the top 5 hazards to human health. Paints and finishes are among the leading causes.
Paints and finishes release low level toxic emissions into the air for years after application. The source of these toxins is a variey of VOC's (Volatile Organic Compounds) which, until recently, were essential to the performance of the paint.
It is unsafe to be exposed to these compounds in large quantities or over extended periods of time.
New environmental regulations, and consumer demand, have led to the development of low-VOC and zero-VOC paints and finishes. Most paint manufacturers now produce one or more non-VOC variety of paint. These new paints are durable, cost-effective and less harmful to human and environmental health.

Benefits
Health. Reduced toxins benefit everyone, including those with allergies and chemical sensitivities.
Environment. Reduces landfill, groundwater and ozone depleting contaminants.
Effective. According to a recent study by Consumer Reports, low-VOC products performed well in terms of coverage, scrubability and hideability (covering flaws on previous coats).
Water-Based. Easy cleanup wtih soap and warm water.
Little or No Hazardous Fumes. Low odor during application; no odor once cured. No off-gassing. Painted areas can be occupied sooner, with no odor complaints.
Not Deemed Hazardous Waste. Cleanup and disposal greatly simplified.

Types of Non-Toxic Paints and Finishes
The term "non-toxic" is used here in its broadest sense. With paints and finishes, it's more a matter of degree. Even Zero-VOC formulations contain some small amounts of toxins. Here are three general categories of non-toxic (or low-toxic) paints: Low VOC, Zero VOC,and Natural Paints


Low VOC - Low VOC paints, stains and varnishes use water as a carrier instead of petroleum-based solvents. As such, the levels of harmful emissions from water-borne surface coatings are significantly lower than solvent-borne surface coatings. These certified coatings also contain no, or very low levels, of heavy metals and formaldehyde. The amount of VOC's varies among different "low-VOC" products, and is listed on the paint can. Paints and stains must not contain VOCs in excess of 200 grams per litre. Varnishes must not contain VOCs in excess of 300 grams per liter.
Low VOC paints will still emit an odor until dry. If you are particularly sensitive, make sure the paint you buy contains fewer than 25 grams/liter of VOC's.

Benjamin Moore Pristine EcoSpec - Low VOC's, under 10 grams/liter. Flat, eggshell, semi-gloss finishes and a primer.

AFM Safecoat - Flat, Eggshell, Semi-Gloss interior enamels; exterior satin; primer; deck coat. (619 239-0321)

ICI-Glidden-CIL Ultra Hide - Low VOC's, under 10 grams/liter. Flat, Eggshell, Semi-Gloss interior. (1 800 984-5444)

Cloverdale EcoLogic - Flat, eggshell, semi-gloss premium interior latex.

Carver Tripp Safe & Simple - Line of water-based stains and clear finishes that are low or free of toxics as well as low VOC's. Widely available at most hardware/home stores.


Zero VOC - These paints are the safest for your health and for the environment. Any paint with VOC's in the range of .5 grams/liter or less can be called "Zero VOC", according to an EPA standard. Some manufacturers may claim "Zero-VOC's", but these paints may still use colorants, biocides and fungicides with some VOC's. Adding a color tint usually brings the VOC level up to 10 grams/liter, which is still quite low.

AFM Safecoat - Flat interior latex; semi-gloss interior enamel. (619 239-0321)

Earth Tech - Interior and exterior flat, satin and semi-gloss zero-VOC paints, and non-toxic clear and pigmentable finishes. (303) 465-1537

ICI Lifemaster 2000 - Flat, Eggshell, semi-gloss interior; primer.(1 800 984-5444)

ICI Decra-Shield - Exterior zero-VOC paints. (1 800 984-5444)

Kelly-Moore Enviro-Cote - ENVIRO-COTE line of paints are zero-VOC. (916 921-0165)

Devoe Wonder Pure - see www.devoepaint.com

Sherwin Williams - new HARMONY line of zero-VOC low-odor latex interior paints. Flat, eggshell, semi-gloss and primer. (www.sherwin.com)

Frazee Paint EnviroKote - Line of interior zero-VOC paints: semi-gloss, flat, and primer. (1 800 826-9048)


Natural Paints and Finishes - These are paints made from natural raw ingredients such as water, plant oils and resins, plant dyes and essential oils; natural minerals such as clay, chalk and talcum; milk casein, natural latex, bees' wax, earth and mineral dyes. Water-based natural paints give off almost no smell. The oil-based natural paints usually have a pleasant fragrance of citrus or essential oils. Allergies and sensitivities to these paints is uncommon.

Livos - A full line of organic paint, stains, oils and waxes that are made using all natural ingredients. Coatings are linseed oil and citrus oil based, non toxic, low VOC and are designed mainly for wood. (www.livos.com) Livos Australiawww.lisp.com.au/~livos)

Auro - A full line of solvent-free, water-based natural paints and primers, finishes, stains and adhesives. Auro products are distributed in North America and the UK.

EcoDesign's BioShield - Line of natural paints and finishes. (www.bioshieldpaint.com)

Tried & True Wood Finishes - Line of zero-VOC, all natural, food-safe, biodegradable wood finishes. Distribution is primarily through mail-order catalogs (www.calistawood.com).

Weather-Bos - Line of natural stains, finishes and paints. Blends of natural oils and resins designed to adhere to the wood, forming a monolithic bond. (www.weatherbos.com)

Old Fashioned Milk Paint Company - non-toxic paint made with milk protein, lime, clay and earth pigments. (www.milkpaint.com)

Sawyer Finn Natural Milk Paint - non-toxic milk paint in powder form, wide choice of colors. (www.sawyerfinn.com)


Non-toxic Paint Strippers

Most paint strippers are caustic - they work by melting the paint. The active ingredient, methylene chloride, is a known carcinogen.
A new generation of biodegradable paint strippers is now entering the market. They are water-soluble, noncaustic and nontoxic - some can even be washed down the drain.
Some examples are:

CitriStrip - from Specialty Environmental Technologies, in Auburn Hills, MI.

Woodfinisher's Pride - from W.M.Barr & Co. in Memphis, TN.

Ameristrip - from Safe Alternatives Corp. in Ridgefield, CT.

Peel Away - from Dumond Chemicals, in New York. (212-869-6350)

The active ingredient in these products is N-Methylpyrrolidone, an organic solvent. Rather than burning or melting, the compound chemically changes the paint itself, softening its bond with the substrate and changing its structure so it can't reharden.
The downside? These new strippers are more expensive than their traditional counterparts, and they take longer to work.


Tips

~ Read the label and product literature: Besides general information, look for:
VOC Content: Usually listed in grams per liter, this can range from 5 to 200. Using a product with the lowest VOC content will yield the lowest overall health risk.
Solids Content: Solids, or pigments, can range in concentration from 25% to 45% by volume. The higher the percent solids, the less volatiles in the paint.
EPA, OSHA, DOT Registrations: When a product has an EPA, OHSA or DOT registration number, this means that it contains toxic ingredients which must be monitored. One way to ensure that you are using a product that is safe both for the environment and the applicator is to seek out products which are not registered with these agencies.

~ Re-use Turpentine and Paint Thinners. Simply allow used thinner or turpentine to stand in a closed, labeled container until paint or dirt particles settle to the bottom. Pour off the clear liquid and reuse.

~ Avoid Cleaning Brushes and Rollers. Paint brushes and rollers used for an on-going project can be saved overnight, or even up to a week, without cleaning at all. Simply wrap the brush or roller snugly in a plastic bag, such as a used bread or produce bag. Squeeze out air pockets and store away from light. The paint won't dry because air can't get to it. Simply unwrap the brush or roller the next day and continue with the job. (This works for all water and oil-based paints and stains. It does not work for varnishes or lacquers.)

~ Circulate. To reduce the impact of indoor air pollutants, circulate fresh air through your house as often as possible. Avoid the use of spray paints altogether. When painting ceilings, especially, be sure to provide cross-ventilation to remove paint fumes. Fumes rise as paint dries, and so with ceilings the fumes dissipate more slowly since there's no air above the paint. You can reduce fresh paint odors by placing a small dish of white vinegar in the room.

~ Beware Old Lead Paint. Paint manufactured before the 70's contains lead, which has harmful effects on health and development. If the paint is still in good shape, you can paint over it, or leave it be - lead is only poisonous if ingested or inhaled. If paint must be removed in small areas, wet the surface and scrape carefully. Clean up with trisodium phosphate (TSP). For large areas, call in a professional certified in lead abatement.

~ Remember the BUD rule. BUY no more product than you need. Ask your retailer for help in assessing the quantity you need. USE up all the product you buy. Give leftovers to a neighbor or community organization. DISPOSE of leftovers in a safe, responsible manner.

Consumers can help speed the development and lower the cost of non-toxic paints by choosing products which contain fewer hazardous ingredients. Choosing to use non-toxic, environmentally safe paints and stains can also greatly reduce the amount of toxins in the air, water and earth.
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#3 of 16 Old 05-13-2004, 08:22 PM
 
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& congrats on your house! coooool
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#4 of 16 Old 05-14-2004, 11:25 AM
 
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For unchipping lead paint, we painted over with a special paint designed to contain the lead. For chipping paint on our windows, we removed it away from our property (one set at a restoration place that basically soaked the whole window in paint remover; another hand scraped by a handyman) before repainting. For chipping lead paint on our windowsills, we used cloths the paint sticks to when removed. You put on a chemical remover, press the cloth into it, and let it sit. When you peel off the cloth, all the paint comes with it so there isn't dust flying around.

If those aren't options, definitely keep everything as wet as possible while you do it, and keep small kids/ potentially pregnant women out of the area until everything's cleaned up.
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#5 of 16 Old 05-14-2004, 02:16 PM
 
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Yet another reason I love my Rainbow vaccum cleaner. All dirt and dust is contained in the water.

The first house dh and I bought the kitchen cabinets where once painted with lead paint. Dh and I just painted over that and never had any more chipping problems..

I dusted also with my Rainbow to help with any lead dust that may have been around cabinets drawers and just general dusting.

Congrats on your new house

We also just bought another house
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#6 of 16 Old 05-15-2004, 09:31 PM
 
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This is a huge safety and health issue, so be careful.

My best friend and her dh had to repaint the outside of their house, and their son ended up very high on his blood lead test (required at age 1 in NY and OH, where they are) which forced him to undergo monthly blood testing, they had an inspector sent in by their health department, and are now forced to remove all of the 20+ doors and windows from their house at an unreal cost to them (with no government help despite being forced to do it by the government, and that their son's lead level has gone way down because they've eliminated the source). Not to mention the fright that they might have hurt his health in some way by doing this...

From home test kits we used, which I don't totally trust, I believe that we have some lead in our home (any paint from before 1970, I believe could have lead in it, any house painted pre 1950 almost definitely does). Because of the worry, I have been fanatical about this as far as reading and researching. Here are some articles I found about this that are really worth reading:

http://www.healthgoods.com/education...me%5Falert.htm

http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/doh/pdf...lead03-a04.pdf

This one is EXCELLENT, and repeats a lot of what my friend has told me based on her experiences:
http://www.leadvac.com/euroclean/lea...cles/doors.htm

She also just sent me a copy of Fine Homebuilding magazine with a great article in it with sources for products, testing and safety gear...November of 2002.

Whatever you do, don't use a vacuum to clean up...from what I understand, even a household HEPA filtered vacuum allows a certain % of air to blow past without going through the filter, so that's the worst thing you can do, as inhaling the dust is one of the fastest/easiest ways for a child to absorb it and get poisoned. Apparently, some local health departments have sealed HEPA vac's with a canister that you can borrow or rent if you must vac...

Also, realize that doors and windows have to be professionally stripped (off site, preferably), or replaced to be safe...anything with friction that makes dust can't be safe simply by painting over it.

PLEASE PM me if you want more info or have questions...

P.S. arthead....thanks sooo much for all of those products. I'm currently using milk paint on a room re-do, but I've been looking for more good stuff and it's so hard to find without hours of searching...
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#7 of 16 Old 05-19-2004, 02:48 AM
 
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Here's a book I found very useful : Lead is a Silent Hazard, by Richard M Stapleton.
It has alot of clea, detailedr information about lead - paint, water, toys,and what you can do solve it, the problems and advantages of different solutions.I sort of feel that, unfortunately, it shoud be required reading for parents.
A mere coat of paint is NOT enough to block lead. One solution that the painter and I came up with was to put an extremely thin layer of plaster all over the entire wall instead of just refilling the cracks. I feel much better about that side of the room than the other were we first started working and only filled in the cracks. 2 years later a web of fine cracks is reassering itself, but not on the other side. I'm not sure if that would create problems for future workers on that wall after we move... and feel a little guilty. But I could not afford an "encapsulant."
Another phamphlet stated that in a study, households where a maid came in and washed the walls, floors (toys?) with a phosphate cleaner (weekly? monthly? I don't remember how often), the amount of lead tested in children's blood was much lower than in other households were this did not happn. (Only phosphate will pick up lead dust, not mere soap).
I live in a brownstone in NY, and its been a real problem.
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#8 of 16 Old 05-19-2004, 12:13 PM
 
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Super long post...

I agree, kira. This whole lead law system is a total disaster--actually, I'm thinking about making a web site on this topic to warn parents with kids in old homes before it's too late and they've hurt themselves and their kids, because it's really hard to find good information about the actual hazards in the house as well as ways to manage them safely.

First, when you sell a house, you have to sign this 'disclosure' thing that says 'I don't know of any lead sources in my house'...who would know? and how many people wouldn't lie and sign the form if they did know or suspect? And when you're buying an old house for it's charm, you just don't think about it, or care--I didn't really care until my friend warned me about what happened to her son. The pamphlet says nothing about wiping the windowsills and floors nearby in an old house with peeling window paint once a week with phosphate soap and water, and from what I understand, that is one of the best things you can do to pick up the dust. Personally, I won't let DH open any of our windows (and it's starting to get warm in here), except at the top, because we have a huge pile of paint chips in the bottom of every one, and I just finally found out how to take care of it as safely as possible. Besides that, I am actually quite sure that the weather stripping in my window wells and door jambs is lead or a lead alloy..they were so heavy on the window I fixed...that's what the windows slide up and down on!

Second, there are all kinds of other items that contain lead that the government pamphlet barely mentions if at all:

--candle wicks with a metal core are lead (burning lead fumes are worse than dust if you inhale it),
--mini blinds made outside of the US but still sold here pose a threat (my friend's tested positive for lead, so she had to replace them all)
--solder in old water pipes can contain lead, stained glass solder, brass items contain lead solder as well
--bowls and plates and 'lead crystal' can contain lead, especialy old pottery but also those nice new imported plates and bowls are suspect
--another friend found a warning label on brand new Christmas lights he bought at Target and put up this year that there was lead in the casing
--if you live by a highway, the soil can be contaminated from leaded gasoline (people with old cars still put lead additive in so the engine will run)
--what if a family member does painting or construction and brings dust home on their clothes, etc.
--fishing weights (how many times did I bite those line weights with my teeth to crimp them as a kid???), wheel weights for balancing your tires (as kids we used to collect them off the road for my xbil who was making a lead keel for his sailboat)
--anti-fouling paint on boat bottoms had very high levels

I'm sure there are lots more....

Next, home testing kits are, in my opinion, totally trash...don't waste your money. I used one kit I bought at home depot...followed the instructions to the letter, came up negative on everything (then proceeded to sand a ton of stuff inside the house with only a paper dust mask on..now I'm pretty sure that most of that was leaded paint). After my friend had the trouble, I purchased a box of swabs that are the same as their 'official' tester used, and those were pretty good, but don't work in the presence of plaster dust, so I can't be sure about my walls anywhere in the house, because you have to expose all layers of paint to test, and can't do that without cutting into the plaster. I bought a third kit just recently that gave me outrageously high positive results on every non-painted wood surface in the house, but 6 inches away on the dust on the TV, no lead...I honestly think the chemical was just taking the stain off my furniture for a positive brown result! I haven't had time to ask the company yet...

Even my friend whose son had the high level, after getting the results from the 'official' tester, ripped a small wall out in the kitchen for some plumbing work (based on the results from his x-ray test saying there was no lead in their wall paint). That month their son's blood level jumped way up again, and they sent a piece of the wall off to a lab where her husband works for chemical testing...it tested positive...

Also, the article in Fine Homebuilding magazine that my friend sent me said that one contractor who sands a lead painted home on a windy day can contaminate the whole neighborhood! I just watched my neighbor sand a window 12 feet from my driveway (and I warned her before, so what can I do, but take my daughter inside until it rains and at least washes the dust down?)

Anyhow, I don't want anyone to panic about this, but I DO want you all to think about it and be careful of what you do, and please do PM me if you need more info. Also, DO realize that so many of us probably had quite high lead levels as kids (compared to today), and for the most part we turned out OK....

If we keep eliminating the toxins from our children and from our environment, just think about how smart they could potentially be...they'll ship us off the planet to live on Mars someday in exchange for ruining the earth.
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#9 of 16 Old 05-20-2004, 03:44 AM
 
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Yes! It's really dangerous & toxic. I was so shocked whem I started reading about it too! It really is better to leave it alone if you can...

Does anyone know if doing a body cleanse (for toxins & metals) is helpful? Someone asked me that today.
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#10 of 16 Old 05-20-2004, 12:33 PM
 
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I know that when kids have really high levels, they give them chemical chelators to draw the lead out (like they do with mercury exposure--it may even be some of the same chelators). The problem I read about with that is it opens up the sites in your blood to pick up more lead if you're still exposed to the source, so the source must be eliminated or reduced first.

My friend's son was not high enough that their doctors felt that chelators were justified, so they just continued testing him monthly, and he did drop into the safe zone.

She did read something about kelp powder being helpful, so she tried it--made him peanut butter and kelp sandwiches, etc.--and felt that it helped lower his level, but who knows? The doctors she was seeing were actually surprised to see her ds drop from 26 to 19 (I think it's micrograms per litre, but not sure) in a month after his first test. Since then, though, I read somewhere that the lead only stays in the blood for about 3 months after exposure, then it's absorbed into your muscles and bones...
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#11 of 16 Old 05-20-2004, 10:36 PM
 
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eek... the part about the lead absorbing into your muscles & bones... anyone else wanna share a bubble-house with me?!

thanks for the info Gmom, i'll pass it on
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#12 of 16 Old 05-21-2004, 01:39 AM
 
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I don't know if all of it is absorbed or if some of it is excreted or what, so please look into that more before passing it on, though I just did a quick search and came up with this (this info is new to me, but it does mention lead being stored in bone, not muscle):
From this web site at the National Safety Council:
http://www.nsc.org/library/facts/lead.htm

"When a pregnant woman has an elevated blood lead level, that lead can easily be transferred to the fetus, as lead crosses the placenta. In fact, pregnancy itself can cause lead to be released from the bone, where lead is stored -- often for decades -- after it first enters the blood stream. (The same process can occur with the onset of menopause.) Once the lead is released from the mother's bones, it re-enters the blood stream and can end up in the fetus. In other words, if a woman had been exposed to enough lead as a child for some of the lead to have been stored in her bones, the mere fact of pregnancy can trigger the release of that lead and can cause the fetus to be exposed. In such cases, the baby is born with an elevated blood lead level."

I do recall a post on MDC some time ago (maybe 6 months, when my friend first had the problem) from a mom whose children had lead levels of 50 or so, which is super high, and one child had to wear a helmet on her head almost all the time for a few years because her skull was actually soft from the lead, and it could have been deadly if she had hit her head...something like that.

I think she said one of her children would proably end up being short because the lead stunted their muscle and bone growth. Otherwise, if I recall correctly, they were probably going to be OK over time..
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#13 of 16 Old 05-21-2004, 09:38 AM
 
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(1) I know a mother who made her child eat large quantities of greens at every meal including breakfast, lots of protein, after her child tested super high for lead. The lead levels came down very quickly. Because of our living condition (a communal brownstone in Brooklyn with poor wall conditions outside of my bedroom - my child and I don't use the communal space), I give my child lots of seaweed (supposed to chelate heavy metals out of the body), about the only desert he has is fruit kanten (made out of a seaweed derivative called agar agar that also is very good for removing heavy metals from the stomach, he loves it). Protein is also important.His blood levels were "4" one year, and under "4" the other.
(2) Most European countries banned lead in the early 1900's, as scientists knew then the effects of lead on children. In the United States, paint companies, knowing the dangers of lead, lobbied congress with millions and millions of dollars in order for laws not to be passed banning lead. Not until the 1970's or 1980's was lead paint banned (although I think it was still legally permitted for office buildings and some other public places). Now, WHY are laws always trying to make landlords responsible for the astronomical costs of removing lead (which, is not necessarily a great solution as the ensuing pollution can make things worse for a child), when the paint companies should be the ones to take responsibility. They, not the landlords, misled the American public for decades, and it is children who are paying the price. Why is there not a class action lawsuit nationwide to make them responsible and take care of this problem.
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#14 of 16 Old 06-11-2004, 08:07 PM
 
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Hi - I skimmed the previous messages, but haven't read them in depth. So I may repeat some info already posted, but I'll try to be brief!

We just moved into an older home with lead-based paint on the windows and trim work. The sad thing is - we did not have a lead-based paint inspection. However, the owners already had a previous inspection which they withheld until after we signed the contract. When we saw it, we flipped! The lead dust levels were over 100x the limit set by the EPA. We had further tested done to include additional lead dust swipes, under the windows and around the baseboards. (I STRONGLY advise that you pay for this - it's priceless info... You know exactly where your problems are). Since the owners did not show us the info (as required by law) until after we signed the contract, we negotiated with them to cover half the cost of replacing the windows. We did this BEFORE moving in, and then I swept and mopped several times before we moved in. I painted over most of the baseboards but have not painted over the window trim yet.

Here's what I've learned and what I think is good info:
1) do any lead removal BEFORE you move your furniture in; it's very hard to get lead dust out of sofas, etc., and the stuff will go everywhere.

2) friction areas are most important (i.e., windows/doors).

3) wet-sand by hand, if you have to sand anything. The chips aren't as dangerous as the dust, even if ingested - it will mostly pass through the intestines undigested and come out in poop. It's the fine dust that the body absorbs (I think chips should definitely be removed/covered, but try doing it without sanding). (*I know we were all told to that the paint chips are the more dangerous of chips or dust, but - from what I've read, experts now believe the opposite. Of course, ingesting chips is not good! But the dust is more dangerous. Our pediatrician has seconded this info for us, as has reading updated info on the web. I still talk to friends/family who believe it's just the chips and think we went overboard. But, hey, it's my child we're talking about! Not taking any chances

4) afterwards, use automatic dishwasher detergent to clean up lead dust - it bonds with lead unlike other cleaners, which don't pick it up. (You know how you can't wash leaded crystal in an automatic dishwasher b/c it becomes cloudy? That's why). But it has to be Cascade or something - not Seventh Generation, etc. - b/c the environmentally friendly ones don't contain the chemical that bonds with the lead.

5) have your children tested for lead before you move in, to get a baseline, then test every few months for awhile after moving in, to see if they're getting exposure from anywhere.

Hope this helps! Also, for environmentally friendly paints, I second the suggestion about Sherwin-Williams 'Harmony' line. Also visit http://www.environmentalhomecenter.com Excellent resource and nice people!

Take care,
Maria
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#15 of 16 Old 06-12-2004, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you to everyone for their replies.

We start the work in a few days after we close on the house. My husband is going to wet scrape the windowsills and then clean up. I feel okay about how we will remove the paint. After reading all I could get my hands on, I think we will handle this very safely.

Then we will paint over it. We ordered a can of paint from Auro (thanks to Arthead's extensive list of paints). Auro paint is expensive, but we felt that it was worth it. It is so non-toxic that once you are done with it, you let the rest dry and it then goes into your compost pile. It was tested on children's toys in fact.

After the painting, we are going to steam the rugs with a rental steamer using Dr. Bronners soap. Then we are going to have a professional come in and rinse the rugs with plain water. We have heard that the do-it-yourself rental units don't have enough suction power to get everything out of the rugs. But the professionals here won't do the cleaning of the rugs without detergents that we don't want in our rugs. So this is the best option we could come up with.
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#16 of 16 Old 06-12-2004, 10:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenS
After the painting, we are going to steam the rugs with a rental steamer using Dr. Bronners soap. Then we are going to have a professional come in and rinse the rugs with plain water. We have heard that the do-it-yourself rental units don't have enough suction power to get everything out of the rugs. But the professionals here won't do the cleaning of the rugs without detergents that we don't want in our rugs. So this is the best option we could come up with.
This sounds like a very good solution to the cleanup process as far as the rugs are concerned. Good luck with your closing and cleanup! Carrie
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