Pregnancy and essential oils-please help - Mothering Forums
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 25 Old 05-28-2007, 05:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
newcastlemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: My happy place
Posts: 3,949
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have been trying to find out what oils are safe during pregnancy. The problem is there is so much conflicting info on the web. Here is what I need: A pregancy-safe essential oil bug body spray recipe and some to put in homemade toothsoap (I like organge or peppermint).

So are orange, peppermint, lavener, citronella, eucalyptus safe in pregnancy? What others?

Thanks so much!
Jen

Love your neighbor. Say yes to vax.
newcastlemama is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 25 Old 05-28-2007, 06:03 PM
 
bstandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sierra Foothills, CA
Posts: 531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know for sure lavender is safe. I think I've read that citrus oils are always safe (when used appropriately of course).

In my pregnancy I've just stayed away from oils that I can find specific warnings for: "Do not use while pregnant" since nobody can actually do studies to determine if something is really safe or not but it's easier to tell what is definitely not safe.

I've never seen specific warnings against peppermint or orange or eucalyptus but don't know for sure. Sorry I can't be more help!

Married to my wonderful DH; Mama to DS born 6-07 and 4 in heaven brokenheart.gif1-06 (7 weeks) brokenheart.gif1-10 (6 weeks) and our twins 5-11, brokenheart.gifone sweet boy (17 weeks) and brokenheart.gifone precious baby girl (18 1/2 weeks).

In the middle of our adoption journey and are excitedly waiting to get matched with a birth mom

bstandlee is offline  
#3 of 25 Old 05-28-2007, 06:25 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi there, I shall try to help......

Basically a lot of books and information written on EOs are not based on any clinical evidence, but rather received wisdom - which can be chinese whispers or generalisations from X is poisonous if I take Y amount internally, therefore do not use even a drop of EO of X. More on dosage later.

Also I assume you are only talking about using EOs externally (toothpaste included, as you spit not swallow) - I can only advise you on EXTERNAL usage.

Another myth to bust is not using EOs before 3 months, the reason so many people stress this is because many many pregnancies end quite naturally in the first trimester and women, naturally, always search for reasons, if the last thing you did was have an aromatherapy massage or use a certain product, well practitioners and manufacturers are just not going to take a risk of getting sued. SO I´M NOT ADVISING THE USE OF EOs BEFORE 3 MONTHS , but I will say that I did so and my LO is here and healthy.

A rather dull book I have as a clinical aromatherapist, is (I think) the only book on essential oil safety to be backed up with clinical evidence and medical case notes. No conjecture or unproven statements. Most of the EOs listed as unsuitable for use in pregnancy you would not commonly find for sale to the public anyway. So, getting to the point.....

NEVER USE...(even if you´re not pregnant, unlikely to be for sale anyhow)

Bitter Almond, Basil (methyl chavicol chemotype), Sweet Birch, Boldo Leaf, Buchu, Cade, Cassia, Camphor, Cinnamon Bark, Costus, Elecampane, Fig Leaf, Horseradish, Melaleuca bracteata, Mustard, Mugwort, Pennyroyal, Rue, Dalmation Sage, Sassafras, Tansy, Tarragon, Tea abssolute, Thuja, Verbena, Wintergreen, Wormseed, Wormwood.

NOT FOR USE DURING PREGNANCY... (the above and...)

Ho leaf, Hyssop, Indian Dill, Parsley Leaf, Parsley Seed, Spanish Sage, Savin.

USE ONLY WITH CAUTION DURING PREGNANCY

Lavendula stoechas (spike lavender), Lavender cotton, Oakmoss absolute, Treemoss absolute.

From Essential Oil Safety Data - Tisserand & Balacs

In addition, though not backed with evidence clinical or anecdotal, Julia Davis recommends avoiding the following (the main reason I can see for this is that they are either considered to be very stimulating and/or hormonal in action)

Basil, Birch, Atlas Cedarwood, Clary Sage, Cypress, Jasmine, Juniper Berry, Sweet Marjoram, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rosemary, Tarragon, Thyme.

Those marked in red can be very helpful during labour (but that´s for another time!).

So back to your orginal post (still awake?).

Sweet orange is good, mandarin is generally considered gentler and as it is one of the first oils that can be used on a baby, why not allow them to get to know the odour when they are in the womb - it will be a comforter after the birth.

Lavender Angustifolia (always check the latin name - if it´s not quoted buy another brand) is fine.

Citronella is fine, few individuals experience contact dermatitis but you can try it without harming your baby. This will be the most effective oil for repelling insects.

Eucalyptus also comes in a various species and can be quite powerful, I would say avoid it if you have an alternative.

Peppermint - well the jury is out. I used it very sparingly for terrible heartburn in the first few weeks and later towards the end, though I have to say I worried about it!

Of course you will be diluting any EO you use, for a pregnant woman I believe that it is best to use concentrations of 2% or less - this amounts to 40 drops or less TOTAL EO in 100ml carrier oil. But start at 1% (20 drops TOTAL in 100ml) and see how you go with the insect repellant.

2 -4 drops TOTAL of EO in one of those burners is enough - and remember your brain can block out an odour the way we become accustomed to background noise and not consciously register it after a while. Just because you can no longer smell it, does not mean it is no longer present in the air and working. Don´t be tempted to top it up.

Now as the list of EOs available is pretty long, i shall not write a great long list of those safe to use, but if you have a Q regarding a specific EO or condition you want to treat with EOs, please feel free to PM or post here.

Enjoy your beautifully scented pregnancy, Sadystar, Clinical Aromatherapist.
Sadystar is offline  
 
#4 of 25 Old 05-28-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
While the other poster is right in thinking that citrus oils are generally safe because they are some of the gentler oils, you may want to avoid exposure to the sun after application as your skin is likely to be more sensitive now. And NEVER, EVER expose yourself to the sun after using Bergamot - I´ve seen burns that required hospital treatment!
Sadystar is offline  
#5 of 25 Old 05-28-2007, 11:48 PM
 
JessicaS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 42,757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadystar View Post
While the other poster is right in thinking that citrus oils are generally safe because they are some of the gentler oils, you may want to avoid exposure to the sun after application as your skin is likely to be more sensitive now. And NEVER, EVER expose yourself to the sun after using Bergamot - I´ve seen burns that required hospital treatment!
Lime EO also reacts to sunlight. It shouldn't be used in lipbalms and such.

Not all those who wander are lost 
JessicaS is offline  
#6 of 25 Old 05-29-2007, 02:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
newcastlemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: My happy place
Posts: 3,949
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks bstandlee-hey we might live near eachother-I am in the Sierra fotthills now too.

Thank you so much Sadystar!!! This was the kind of info I needed to make my safe body care

So I think I will make a lavender Angustifolia/citronella bug spray and mandarin toothsoap.

Jen

Love your neighbor. Say yes to vax.
newcastlemama is offline  
#7 of 25 Old 06-17-2007, 10:49 PM
 
milky_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
milky_mama is offline  
#8 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 12:24 AM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi Sadystar,

Thanks for the fabulous information!! I'm reading a book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy by Valerie Worwood. Have you heard of it and/or do you recommend it?

The author says the following oils are safe during pregnancy, and I just wondered if you agree with her recommendations:
Tangerine
Mandarin
Grapefruit
Geranium
Roman Chamomile
Rose Bulgar
Rose Maroc
Jasmine (who can afford that?!?)
Ylang-ylang
Lavender

She doesn't specify which kind of lavender in the section on pregnancy, but in the chart of essential oils in the back of the book she lists "Lavendula Angustifolium, officinalis."

Could you tell me if Orange Valencia is safe during pregnancy? Because I have some already and it would be nice to use it instead of buying mandarin or tangerine, if possible.

It's so confusing trying to figure out which oils are safe for pregnancy, because the various sources (books and people on MDC who claim to be educated in aromatherapy) don't always agree. Oy. I guess I could get through a pregnancy using nothing but unscented Dr. Bronner's soap and unscented homemade lotion, but it would be kind of boring

What about room diffusers? Can "contraindicated" EO's be used as room fresheners during pregnancy? Is the contraindication basically just a warning against skin contact?

Last question - where do you recommend buying essential oils? Do you know of a good brand or online store?
Taedareth is offline  
#9 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 12:41 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would say leave the Jasmine for labour - then you deserve to spash out! But otherwise fine. VAW also wrote "The Fragrant Pharmacy" which I always recommend as it covers EO use for virtually everything - health, skincare, gardening, cleaning....

Lavender Angustifolia or Officinalis are both good oils. I have never come across anything labelled Valencia Orange, does the bottle have a latin name on it ? (probably a different name for something I know, hence the importance of always buying brands that list latin names). Though, I suspect it is just fine, citrus oils are generally considered gentle and appropriate for pregnant women.

As regards using oils in burners, so long as you stick to using 2-4 drops and don´t get tempted to top it up (remember your nose gets used to the smell, so they can still be working even if you can´t smell it consciously) then you should be fine with anything EXCEPT the oils I said not to use. You nose is a very sensitive organ during pregnancy, so don´t overdo, if it annoys you get rid!

I think I mentioned before that OPINIONS are not really reliable when it comes to EOs, because they are usually extrapolations of information (eg INTERNAL usage applied to EXTERNAL), the lists I mentioned from Tisserand and Balacs are the only information I was given during my training that was based on clinical evidence and anecdotal evidence from cases seen by doctors.

I don´t think we need to worry half as much as we do about these things......if it really was so easy to lose a baby by applying EO of X, then a lot of clinics would be out of business uh? (not that I want to start a discussion on that).

I hope this helps, don´t resort to the unperfumed Dr Bronner´s, there´s no need - and what a wonderful time to celebrate your womanliness by spoiling yourself with beautiful smelling oils!
Sadystar is offline  
#10 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 05:10 PM
 
milky_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This is a list I found in a book recommended to me, Beauty by Nature by Brigitte Mars.

ESSENTIAL OILS TO BE AVOIDED DURING PREGNANCY

angelica
anise
basil
bitter almond
camphor
cinnamon
clary sage
clove
cypress
fennel
frankincense
hyssop
juniper
lovage
marjoram
myrrh
oregano
pennyroyal
sage
sassafras
savory
thyme
wintergreen


ESSENTIAL OILS SAFE FOR TOPICAL USE IN SMALL AMOUNTS DURING PREGNANCY

chamomile
clary sage
geranium
jasmine
lavender
neroli
peppermint
rose
rosemary
ylang ylang

This list taken from the book Beauty by Nature by Brigitte Mars, published by Healthy Living Publications, Summertown, Tennessee, 2006.
milky_mama is offline  
#11 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 05:49 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I see that clary sage (Salvia sclarea) is in both lists?! I would say leave that for labour when it will be really helpful to get contractions going and/or for its pain relieving qualities.
Sadystar is offline  
#12 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 05:55 PM
 
amcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Arizona
Posts: 4,654
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
amcal is offline  
#13 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 10:02 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
lol, that's what i mean by "confusing" - the Fragrant Pharmacy book (which is the book I have, except in the USA it's sold under the title I mentioned above) it says "Pregnancy is a time to use milder oils like spearmint instead of peppermint" but in the next paragraph she lists her "safe" oils and spearmint isn't even on it. So confusing. I'll just keep in mind that citrus is safe. Thank you

Also, I read on another thread that someone was using a deodorant with lavender and tea tree EO's in it, and this caused her to gain weight. She later discovered it's because those EO's mimic estrogen. So, are there any other EO's that mimic estrogen and might cause unhealthy weight gain (during pregnancy or otherwise)? Does this mean that lavender and tea tree EO should never be applied to the skin? :
Taedareth is offline  
#14 of 25 Old 07-06-2007, 11:18 PM
 
milky_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadystar View Post
I see that clary sage (Salvia sclarea) is in both lists?! I would say leave that for labour when it will be really helpful to get contractions going and/or for its pain relieving qualities.
True ... I didn't notice that before. That's weird.
milky_mama is offline  
#15 of 25 Old 07-07-2007, 06:06 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi Sadystar,

I was just comparing your list of "NEVER USE" oils to the Uncle Harry's brand of EO's, which are sold at our local Super Supplements and Food Co-Op. Their oils apparently are steam distilled and 100% pure, which is good.

But they sell a bunch of the oils that are on the "NEVER USE" list, such as Thuja, Cade, Wintergreen, Wormwood, Basil, and possibly others (I didn't check them all). Why are these oils dangerous?
Taedareth is offline  
#16 of 25 Old 07-07-2007, 07:36 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We may be coming up against a cultural difference here, as these oils are not generally for sale in the UK - being brief, and without going into all the studies in detail, these oils are listed as "never use" in Tisserand and Balacs due to containing high concentrations of different chemicals which have shown to be severely toxic (producing convulsions and the like) in internal usage from very low dosages. My insurance would not cover me to use them on a client, however that doesn´t make them illegal to sell. Some licenced pharmaceutical preparations contain them in incredibly small doses in the UK, but these things do vary from country to country - the more I look into clinical practice, the more I realise there are no definitive answers, just culturally different accepted risks. I too am not immune from that.

All EOs vary in their chemical constituency due to the place and conditions in which they were grown and how they are processed - two different batches will never be identical. A few EOs vary so greatly that they have distinct "chemotypes" - that is some chemical constituents are far more present than others. Basil is one of these oils that has different chemotypes. The basil EO on the list I mentioned never to use is of the methyl chavicol chemotype, granted most commercial oils don´t have such information on the bottle, but if you buy from good suppliers then they will have done this work for you and should be able to tell you (as well as send you chemical analysis sheets for the individual batches) - we´re getting into the realms of chemistry now, which the average consumer isn´t up for - this is why it is important to buy from reputable companies, who care about what is in the bottle and won´t buy these chemotypes just to make a buck.

So back to Basil.....it is thought to have hormonal actions, but that is not proven from external usage. It is not generally never use and a good supplier will not be selling the methyl chavicol chemotype.

Your previous post regarding lavender and tea tree.....

this seems to be some sort of MDC myth! I have never in two years of training and several years of practice come across research or experience to suggest oestrogenic action of the two oils. I have heard someone say "ah but there was this study...." well it´s not something publicised in the clinical aromatherapy community and I´m sure if you googled "the world was created by green and white striped pigs" you´d find someone somewhere arguing the case - that is the problem with the internet, to much unsubstantiated nonsense that people take as fact because they "read" it! Obviously not you as you had the good sense to question it!

And as for "my deodorant made me fat"........does that sound plausible? Higher calorific intake than output is what causes us to put on weight, period.

Finally, peppermint.....is very stimulating, you only have to smell it to realise that, there is no clinical evidence to suggest not using it in pregnancy, though it is sometimes recommended not to use such strong oils as what is a drop for you is a large dose for the baby. Perhaps more importantly, and to underline the importance of latin names, what is often sold as peppermint (particularly in the US) is Mentha arvensis which is stronger than Mentha x piperita which is what most aromatherapists mean when they use the word peppermint. M. arvensis has some neurotoxic properties.

I´m not sure whether I am clarifying anything or merely muddying the waters now! Everything I have mentioned as fact rather than opinion is based on the clinical studies of Tisserand and Balacs, if I have said "it is sometimes recommended...." that is OPINION of others.
Sadystar is offline  
#17 of 25 Old 07-07-2007, 08:18 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Great information!! Thank you, and it does make sense.

So would you say that there's any difference between "Hungarian Lavender" Lavandula augustifolium L. and regular Lavender Lavandula angustifolia? The company's website http://www.brambleberry.com/essential.html says they have a slightly different fragrance, but I wasn't sure if the Hungarian Lavender would be suitable for pregnancy. Hmm.
Taedareth is offline  
#18 of 25 Old 07-08-2007, 04:44 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taedareth View Post
Great information!! Thank you, and it does make sense.

So would you say that there's any difference between "Hungarian Lavender" Lavandula augustifolium L. and regular Lavender Lavandula angustifolia? The company's website http://www.brambleberry.com/essential.html says they have a slightly different fragrance, but I wasn't sure if the Hungarian Lavender would be suitable for pregnancy. Hmm.
Lavendula angustifolia is suitable in all forms, lavender oil from France always commands a higher price and claims better quality - this is sometimes down to reputation but also because most french lavender is grown from seed whereas most non-french lavender is cloned (not in a GM frankinstein way so don´t worry!). You will also find that lavender grown above 900m also commands a higher price, though it is only "better" if it is distilled at high altitude too (due to the lower boiling point of water at altitude). It is fine, it will smell different, as will every batch of lavender, some more perceptibly than others.

Hungary is one of the main producers of lavender oil, so the fact that it isn´t French shouldn´t worry you. Sometimes these differences that aromatherapists get so caught up in, translate to nothing in reality!
Sadystar is offline  
#19 of 25 Old 07-10-2007, 01:32 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
From a couple of PM's:

Taedareth: How about Ociumum Basilicum? That's the basil EO that our local supplier sells. I was thinking of using it in my insect repellent blend, and maybe a room freshener or perfume (alcohol and water based) or something. Basil is just so lovely. What do you think?

Sadystar: Ocimum Basilicum is the correct species, but within the species there are two main chemotypes, that is a finished product which contains a high percentage of a certain chemical constituent. What you want to avoid is methyl chavicol chemotype, preferably getting a linalool chemotype. This information is unlikely to be on the bottle. Reputable suppliers in the UK would list this information, but I can´t vouch for US suppliers (as we have discussed there are differences in what is considered "safe").

However, the manufacturer should definitely be able to tell you. As a guide, basil oil from france or egypt should be fine, EO from the Comoros islands is likely to have 80% or more methyl chavicol and should be avoided.

Although.....methyl chavicol (aka estragole) has insecticidal properties! So if you get some, don´t use it on your body, but putting it in a burner or using it directly where you have an insect problem could be a good idea! I also just read that the mc chemotype is valued more highly in perfumery than the linalool type - it probably smells better, though in the perfumery industry the percentage in use would be very low, as it would be blended with many other EOs and scents.

BTW...The old spanish men round these parts wear a sprig of basil to ward of the flies in the summer. A very traditional remedy indeed.
Taedareth is offline  
#20 of 25 Old 07-10-2007, 01:52 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Aha! What you said about basil makes sense to me now. The EO supplier's website says their basil comes from Comoros Islands and there's a warning that pregnant women and people with liver problems shouldn't use it. I had wondered if that was just a stock "warning" or if there was a real reason for it. Now I know But I'm glad to hear that it can be used in the environment (in candles, for example) to keep bugs away, even while I'm pregnant. Is that the case with all EO's - even those that are unsuitable for pregnancy can still be used in air diffusers?

Also, how did you decide to become an aromatherapist? What kind of training is involved? How do you find clients, or perhaps I mean, how long did it take you to establish a clientèle and turn a profit? It seems like such a rewarding career. Is it something you can do part-time while also being a mother?

Lemongrass - okay for pregnancy? I bought some citronella like you mentioned above, just to be safe. But I think lemongrass smells just a little bit nicer.

Orange Valencia - the orange oil I talked about earlier is this one: Citrus sinensis 'Valencia'. Probably fine for pregnancy, right?

Bergamot - is it okay for applying to skin during pregnancy? (Diluted, I mean.)

Clove oil - one of my favorite scents!! Apparently this is also contraindicated for pregnancy. But can I use it in my laundry (added to the final rinse) and for our liquid handsoap, etc.?

Eucalyptus Citriodora (lemon eucalyptus) - another one for the insect blend. Ok for spraying on the skin (diluted) during pregnancy?

Cedarwood - safe for pregnancy? MMmm it smells so lovely...

Thyme - the book says Thyme is one of the most powerful disinfectants in the EO kingdom. Or something to that effect But it's contraindicated for pregnancy. Can I still use it in a soap mixture for scrubbing my bathroom? [WOW I just noticed it's $22 per half ounce! Is there some other oil you would suggest for sanitizing the bathroom?]

Geranium oil - this was on my list of things to get because it's supposed to be great at balancing female hormones, and is suitable for pregnancy. The book also said it's good for treating depression. Well, I almost didn't get it because it cost more than most of the other oils on my list, and because when I opened the bottle to sniff, it had a strange musky/earthy odor that didn't appeal to me. But I bought it anyway for the reasons above. Then I took it home and put a drop on a piece of paper, which I fixed in front of a fan that blows air around our apartment during the hot summer months. WOW!! That one drop perfumed our entire downstairs and it was nothing like the way it smelled in the bottle. The fragrance was light and floral, reminding me of a garden in the summer sunshine. And it really was happy-making. No kidding! I don't know if that's due to some hormonal action or if it was the "summertime garden" connotation alone, but now I love geranium!!
Taedareth is offline  
#21 of 25 Old 07-11-2007, 05:35 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Got to be brief... but re all your questions, yes to all the thoughts you had - glad to see you´re getting the EO bug

Re alternatives to thyme, tea tree is very antibacterial and the reason that cleaning products traditionally smell of lemon or pine is because these EOs are also antibac, anti-viral - the smell (even synthetic) is therefore associated with cleanliness. Choose whichever you like, I use a lot of lemon in the bathroom as the smell is so zingy and refreshing first thing in the morning.

Geranium is one of my faves too, It is very strong, though I like to mix floral oils with wood oils.....geranium and cedarwood could work, jasmine and sandalwood will give you one of the best night´s sleep of your life (if you can get any piece from DH´s advances , aphrodisiac as they are, often I put them in a blend for TTC couples), though perhaps one for when you feel like splashing out the dollars!

with love, Sadystar
Sadystar is offline  
#22 of 25 Old 09-26-2007, 03:40 PM
 
Taedareth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: FKA the "land of the free"
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi Sadystar - what do you think about oil of oregano? (Origanum vulgare) I found this about it online:

Oil of Oregano Effectively Treats:

· acne · allergies · arthritis · asthma · athlete's foot · constipation · croup · dandruff · diarrhea · digestive disturbances · insect bites · bronchitis · canker sores · colds · flu · earaches · fatigue · gum disease · parasites · headaches · menstrual irregularities · psoriasis · toenail problems · seborrhea · ringworm · rosacea · sinusitis · muscle pain · varicose veins · warts

The site I read suggested that you can drink one or two drops in a glass of orange juice, and it can be applied topically. Do you think this oil would be safe for pregnancy? Mountainroseherbs sells it reasonably priced. Their description says: Method of Cultivation- Organic (69% Carvacrol)
Taedareth is offline  
#23 of 25 Old 09-26-2007, 04:33 PM
 
sphinxie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,286
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, fun!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taedareth View Post
Also, how did you decide to become an aromatherapist? What kind of training is involved? How do you find clients, or perhaps I mean, how long did it take you to establish a clientèle and turn a profit? It seems like such a rewarding career. Is it something you can do part-time while also being a mother?
I'm a curious about this too, just about what it was generally like setting up a practice

Quote:
Bergamot - is it okay for applying to skin during pregnancy? (Diluted, I mean.)
I can answer this one. It is not safe if you are going to be going out in the sun, not sure for how long, I have read 24 hrs afterwards though I'm sure that's erring on the safe side. The burns and scarring can be severe. Basically it is best to assume that it is not safe to apply to the skin, although if you find a way to work around the photosensitivity (apply to an area where you are very well clothed, on a day when the sun is mild) it can be done. I'm sure diluting helps but still, apply only to an area that will not see the sun.
sphinxie is offline  
#24 of 25 Old 09-26-2007, 05:02 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taedareth View Post
Hi Sadystar - what do you think about oil of oregano? (Origanum vulgare) I found this about it online:

Oil of Oregano Effectively Treats:

· acne · allergies · arthritis · asthma · athlete's foot · constipation · croup · dandruff · diarrhea · digestive disturbances · insect bites · bronchitis · canker sores · colds · flu · earaches · fatigue · gum disease · parasites · headaches · menstrual irregularities · psoriasis · toenail problems · seborrhea · ringworm · rosacea · sinusitis · muscle pain · varicose veins · warts

The site I read suggested that you can drink one or two drops in a glass of orange juice, and it can be applied topically. Do you think this oil would be safe for pregnancy? Mountainroseherbs sells it reasonably priced. Their description says: Method of Cultivation- Organic (69% Carvacrol)

Hello you!

Well I´m glad you bought this up....I´ve always been a little puzzled as to why my training taught me not to use Oregano oil and yet many North Americans I´ve met seem to use it quite commonly. So your question finally got me round to looking it up and it seems here is an important lesson in buying and referring to EOs by their latin names...


True Oregano is Origanum vulgare. However the EO most commonly used in Europe is Thymus Capitus, and most safety data refers to this.

Hence why being European, I´ve been warned off Oregano oil as it has a particularly high Carvacrol content which is a moderate irritant and toxin.

That said, origanum vulgare should have a carvacrol content of around 0.5%, so check out the latin name of the oil. There is a subspecies (Origanum vulgare hirtum which may explain the high carvacol content.

Personally I wouldn´t use an oil with such a high carvacol content, and being trained in the UK, I´m not suitably qualified to recommend internal use of any oil to. anyone
Sadystar is offline  
#25 of 25 Old 09-26-2007, 05:08 PM
 
Sadystar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Spain
Posts: 698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sphinxie View Post
Oh, fun!



I'm a curious about this too, just about what it was generally like setting up a practice



I can answer this one. It is not safe if you are going to be going out in the sun, not sure for how long, I have read 24 hrs afterwards though I'm sure that's erring on the safe side. The burns and scarring can be severe. Basically it is best to assume that it is not safe to apply to the skin, although if you find a way to work around the photosensitivity (apply to an area where you are very well clothed, on a day when the sun is mild) it can be done. I'm sure diluting helps but still, apply only to an area that will not see the sun.

I don´t have a full on practice at the moment, too busy being mama. But I used to have a women´s clinic and it was hard work getting the word around. I think essentially you have to get well trained. In the UK anyone can call themselves an aromatherapist, even if they didn´t train. I trained for 18 months under the guidance of the people hoping to set up some kind of regulatory standards.

If you are well trained then you will have the confidence to treat clients properly and this will infuse your work and become the basis of your reputation. And reputation seems to be the key for any holistic health practitioner.

Re Bergamot: Many if not most companies now refine their Bergamot oil to take out the photosensitising agent. If it specifies Bergaptene or FCF free then it is fine in the sun. And fine for pregnancy.
Sadystar is offline  
Reply


User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Online Users: 1,035

11 members and 1,024 guests
Dovenoir , fljen , idler , K703 , lauritagoddess , omarinbox1888 , preclean56 , RhiannonRain , SophStressed , StarJune , StewartMorrisonv
Most users ever online was 21,860, 06-22-2018 at 09:45 PM.