Aspie Quiz? Realistic/useful or BS? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 02:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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http://rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.php
That's the link to the quiz


My results: http://www.rdos.net/eng/poly12b.php?...&p11=42&p12=52

(ok so since the preview just shows the circle thing on the link, which I don't really get at all, here's what it said:
Your Aspie score: 130 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 73 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie
)

So I'm really thinking that it's BS; just found the quiz on (yet another) random google search and took it mostly 'cause I'm bored I guess;


maybe curious how other aspie adults here "found out" I guess too?:


ETA: ....maybe wrong but mostly thinking it'd be fairly obvious or I'd have known by now, I guess at least in the last 5 mos or so of trying to "find out" for DS. (but there have been a couple occasions where I think, looking at eval questionaires for DS, that I would have been dxed as a kid asking the questions about me....and write off those sites as being bs too..... I know there's a lot of misinformation out there...on the internet about anything really).... and thought *these sites* are reasons why ASD seems so difficult to dx, or is mis- and over- dxd..... can't think of specific ones now, but sure you all know the type - where lots of the *symptoms* are also just normal kid stuff too (like no fear, climbing everythign, etc.)

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#2 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 02:38 PM
 
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I always score really high on those " tests" but I don't know how accurate they are... they seem kind of silly to me! If you are naturally introverted it seems like your score would be really high!

I personally made the connection when researching strategies for my oldest son. Another mom and our homeopath had suggested autism ( which I was really hesitant and rejected the idea of... obviously aspergers doesn't look like classical autism) I had never heard of Aspergers before. When I started to research it I found that I was an even more clearcut case than my son is! It was a real eye opener for me and was so interesting to look back through my childhood and see some things more clearly. I haven't had a diagnosis formally. I am not sure if I ever will really. If I find that I am not coping with life very well then I may do so.

:
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#3 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 02:40 PM
 
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That's actually the leading method self-dx'ers use. It's around WrongPlanet.net quite a lot and seems to be viewed as reliable. I guess it was done by a psychologist who specializes in ASDs. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong!)

I scored a 173 of 200 on that. And just because you see symptoms in your child or have an official dx for your child doesn't mean you'll immediately see symptoms in you. It wasn't until months after my ds1's dx when he was 7 that I started putting 2+2 together for myself. In addition to that test, I also extensively researched online how Asperger's Syndrome shows up in girls.

It may be "mild" for me, but it's there.

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#4 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 02:54 PM
 
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I tried a different test quite awhile ago: http://www.piepalace.ca/blog/asperger-test-aq-test
On that one I can't remember my exact score, high thirties I think, and strongly indicated Aspergers.

I just tried your test now, and I got:
Your Aspie score: 109 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 82 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits.

Who knows? I don't have a diagnosis, but a lot of things seem to fit.

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#5 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 02:58 PM
 
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this exact quiz was part of my journey. The first was the much less inclusive Wired quiz http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html...
After taking that I kind of jokingly said "weird, what if I am autistic and never even knew it"

when I took the test you linked I said:
Quote:
Your Aspie score: 179 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 32 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Do you eat the same food and wear the same clothes every day?
*guilty*


I know this is going to sound very... aspergers of me to scrutinize the test, but I don't particularly feel like the test was very complete I feel like my score was artificially inflated by coincidence. ok I will stop talking now.
With perspective, and connection of some very weird childhood memories, and my mom's flat out refusal to tell me what all of the tests, therapy, etc was for when I was little, I have come to accept that it was always pretty obvious that I am an Aspie. Looking at the DSM-IV criteria... I do not need an aspie quiz, because I can easily qualify when honestly applying those criteria to myself.
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#6 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 03:01 PM
 
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Aspie score 181 out of 200
NT score 35 out of 200

I got 42 on the other test. So bizzare because I don't see my answers as being really odd or anything. My hubby took it and is much more neurotypical than I am. Although some answers were pretty hilarious. On the one that asked if you had a good sense of time he saidthat it was "kind of hard to answer when you didn't even believe in the concept of time". lol

:
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#7 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 03:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Kyamo View Post
I tried a different test quite awhile ago: http://www.piepalace.ca/blog/asperger-test-aq-test
On that one I can't remember my exact score, high thirties I think, and strongly indicated Aspergers.

I just tried your test now, and I got:
Your Aspie score: 109 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 82 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits.

Who knows? I don't have a diagnosis, but a lot of things seem to fit.
I got 33 on that one.
(blue stuff copied like above)
The test assesses five different areas. Autistic-like responses will show poor social skill, attention switching, communication and imagination, and an exaggerated attention to detail. In other words, geekiness. You scored 33. The ranking below provides some idea of where that AQ fits in.

Score
32 - 50 Scores over 32 are generally taken to indicate Asperger's Syndrome or high-functioning autism, with more than 34 an "extreme" score.
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24 Average math contest winner
23
22
21 Average male or female computer scientist
20
19 Average male scientist, and average male or female physicist
18 Average man
17 Average female scientist
16
15 Average woman, and average male or female biologist
14
13
0 - 12




(where's the "I don't have a friggin' clue" smilie?)

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#8 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 03:18 PM
 
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On the first test I scored 127 out of 200 in the aspie section, with 90 out of 200 in the neurotypical section. And on the second test, (which I liked better, personally,) I scored a 32.

And I'm the normalest one in my family. I am trendier, more social, and more extroverted than my mom or most of my siblings. They think I'm weird. Now I know why I don't feel normal anywhere . . .

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#9 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 03:40 PM
 
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Does it help to know a really introverted with sensory issues but definitely not autism spectrum person (me) scored:
Your Aspie score: 45 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 146 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

I am going to have my hubby take that. It's amazing how much I see him in that test--things I thought were just him not Aspie stuff! He didn't discover he might be on the spectrum until our son was diagnosed and he started reading. He's self-diagnosed and presents a whole lot like my pdd-nos son.

Anyway, it seems like a good test to me and I don't think it's unusual to go your whole life and not realize until a child is diagnosed. I think that's somewhat common actually.

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#10 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 03:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Does it help to know a really introverted with sensory issues but definitely not autism spectrum person (me) scored:
.
...that's about how I'd describe myself too. Except without the sensory part.

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#11 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 04:12 PM
 
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I knew I had sensory issues. This quiz says I'm likely an Aspie as well.
Aspie score: 147 of 200
NT score: 61 of 200
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#12 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
With perspective, and connection of some very weird childhood memories, and my mom's flat out refusal to tell me what all of the tests, therapy, etc was for when I was little, I have come to accept that it was always pretty obvious that I am an Aspie. Looking at the DSM-IV criteria... I do not need an aspie quiz, because I can easily qualify when honestly applying those criteria to myself.
Do you wish you would've been told? Would it have made a difference? .....maybe hard to tell/guess after the fact huh?

....seems a bit odd to go through all the therapy w/out ever knowing what for.

OTOH.....maybe they didn't want it to be an *excuse* (on your part, or teachers, or whatever) that would keep you from realizing your full potential.



ETA: ....and do you think the therapies were useful at all ? Or did you have to figure it all out on your own anyway? (and if not useful......just useless or more harm than good?)

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#13 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 04:25 PM
 
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I'm introverted and have some sensory stuff - but I don't have the verbal communication issues the quiz asked about (I'm good with language):

Your Aspie score: 92 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 121 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

(I don't have a clue what that diagram is supposed to show... )
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#14 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 10:53 PM
 
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I got a 35 on the one and on the other I scored 109 on the Aspie score and 92 on the neurotypical. It said I had both traits. I agree. Honestly I think i'm a slight aspie with a lot of social training. My ds2 is exactly like me minus the social training.

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#15 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 11:19 PM
 
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Your Aspie score: 110 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 82 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

now to see what that means....
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#16 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 11:58 PM
 
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Your Aspie score: 107 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 96 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

What's the deal with the "hunting"? I've never heard of that.

On the other test I got a 36..
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#17 of 46 Old 11-18-2008, 11:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
Do you wish you would've been told? Would it have made a difference? .....maybe hard to tell/guess after the fact huh?
Nobody likes being lied to or underestimated, it hurts, a lot. Secrets are about shame, truth is about power.

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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
....seems a bit odd to go through all the therapy w/out ever knowing what for.
I was mostly in special classes, and psychotherapy, it was the early 80s, and to my knowledge there wasn't the same level of EI and other therapies available. It really sucked never knowing why I was being tested, why my class was different, why I was different.

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OTOH.....maybe they didn't want it to be an *excuse* (on your part, or teachers, or whatever) that would keep you from realizing your full potential.
I honestly think my parents were just scared of the big bad Autisticooties, to be perfectly frank, and prideful, I have a high IQ, and my parents treated me as if I was wasting a gift, rather than using an excuse.

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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
ETA: ....and do you think the therapies were useful at all ? Or did you have to figure it all out on your own anyway? (and if not useful......just useless or more harm than good?)
Sign language was useful, psychotherapy was the biggest waste of time ever, idiots telling me I was severely depressed because I did not seek out other people, because socialization was not high on my priority list.

It took me a VERY long time, a lot of heart ache, and a lot of help from some really good personal relationships to get to where I am today, maybe if I had figured out early on a way to chew-stim in a socially acceptable way, or maybe if I had learned to self medicate myself with caffeine earlier, or maybe if I had learned that I need to drown out distractions, and think of many things at once before the clarity singular concentration can happen, it would have been easier, maybe if I had listened to music before age 13 I would have learned that I can invent, concentrate, and be productive much easier in the presence of music...

I can't really know that, I can share my hard won tricks with my kids, I can try to be honest and mindful of their sensory, intellectual, and emotional needs, as well as their physical ones, I can provide my parents with working rules to help them interact with my kids in a way they never could with me. I can listen and I can learn, I can know my kids and acknowledge their strengths, and help them overcome their weaknesses. That is what it means to be human though, humanity stands out in its ability to learn things collectively that cannot be learned in a single life time. My son has the head start I never had, and his son will have even more, just like I got more than my dad ever dreamed.

oops, sorry for the manifesto
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#18 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 12:34 AM
 
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Secrets are about shame, truth is about power.
SWEET! If I had space in my siggy, I would so quote you! I just 'came out' Aspie on my MySpace, because I'm ready to take control of the truth and fully be myself. I have things I must say to the world that won't make sense if people don't know who I am.

Also, I never listened to music until my early teen years either. I wish I had been exposed to more music when I was little, because I have absolutely no internal sense of rhythm. Like a duck on crack...

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#19 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 11:35 AM
 
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i have a really hard time with those quizzes, because nothing is so clear cut for me and i can never choose answers.

in all my recent reading for ds (2yo, we are just beginning our discovery of him), i have had a real mind-blowing realization about my life and personality. all my life i have felt personally to blame for all of my social shortcomings. it has always been that if i didn't fit in, it was because i was not trying hard enough. if i think back, the times where i see myself as successful were times when i tried my very best to fit in and belong with a certain kind or group of people, but those are always also the most miserable times of my life.

and now i know it is not my fault, it isnt your fault. you cant just be normal if you try hard enough. what a terrible injustice inflicted upon so many young people, including myself. i dont know where i fit in, and i dont have a lot of regrets, but i hope i never cause my children to believe they are failures for not changing themselves somehow/ bucking up/ getting over it.

i have never felt understood, rarely felt genuinely liked, and prefer at all times to be socially isolated. i have developed a knack for pretense that frightens me, and i try to shy away from people to avoid using it. that is the honest truth about me. if this mystery with ds werent happening, i might have never eplored this truth about me: it's ok. i am not a failure.

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#20 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 11:44 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I honestly think my parents were just scared of the big bad Autisticooties, to be perfectly frank,
Quite possible, and can't fault 'em for that.....I've been scared for my son; and way more is known about autism now than 30 yrs ago. (I don't think I ever even heard the word as a kid, not that I can recall.....nowadays, everyone knows someone w/ it).

Quote:
Also, I never listened to music until my early teen years either. I wish I had been exposed to more music when I was little, because I have absolutely no internal sense of rhythm.
.....yeah, i have no sense of rhythm either but we always had some sort of music playing; same in our house now, there's almost always a cd in; w/ the only difference being that we try to include lots of variety, classical stuff that I don't think I ever listened to as a kid; folk, jazz, kid's songs,

oh gotta go more to say but later

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#21 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 12:07 PM
 
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i have a really hard time with those quizzes, because nothing is so clear cut for me and i can never choose answers.
I feel like these quizzes CAN be useful, but as Tabitha says, it's asking for people with aspergers (or autism) to be able correctly interpret the situations listed as well as identify what their true reactions are. My son tried this quiz, but he honestly does not see how uncomfortable he makes other people in discussions, so his points for that were not taken. He doesn't LIKE to do things on his own, he LOVES to be around other people, so that was counted as NT, even though he almost NEVER thinks to call an acquaintance or hang out with peers his age (or if he does go out with them he completely ignores them while he goes on and on about his stuff and they ignore him to talk to other peers) He doesn't see his obsessions as much more than interests, and doesn't realize how much TIME he spends on them, so those were other questions that didn't get answered truthfully. He LOVES to make up stories, but he doesn't see that the stories he's creating are little more than cut-n-paste from other things he's read.

Do those all make sense? My dad is the same way, so far on the spectrum that the colors burn my eyes ...and he doesn't see it. Which is why when people tell me that they know they have aspergers because they took an online quiz...I smile and wave....smile and wave. : because who really knows? Although I'm the first to sit in the McD's playland and say to myself...that kids has ISSUES!

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#22 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 12:25 PM
 
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I've taken those quizzes just for curiosity's sake after I already had a formal dx. I was self-diagnosed at 16 using the DSM IV criteria and I got a formal diagnosis from an AS specialist shortly thereafter. I think there are some of those tests that are the real deal (or, at least, as close to the real deal as you can get with an internet test), but there are some of them that aren't.
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#23 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 12:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
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all my life i have felt personally to blame for all of my social shortcomings. it has always been that if i didn't fit in, it was because i was not trying hard enough.

i have developed a knack for pretense that frightens me, and i try to shy away from people to avoid using it. .

....this is true for me too. I thought that "pretending" was what everyone did in social settings? ... the difference for me, I guess, is that I *want* to be .....well, not introverted I guess....it's just hard.

I had a hard time for some of the questions too...some were obvious. Like, "do you often have the urge to jump over things?" Umm, no, can't say that I do. .... "Do you sometimes not know what to do with your arms?" ALWAYS. .....lots of them that were not so clear though; maybe some days yes, some days no.

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#24 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 01:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Do those all make sense? My dad is the same way, so far on the spectrum that the colors burn my eyes ...and he doesn't see it. Which is why when people tell me that they know they have aspergers because they took an online quiz...I smile and wave....smile and wave. because who really knows? Although I'm the first to sit in the McD's playland and say to myself...that kids has ISSUES!
The whole post definitely makes sense....which I guess was kinda my original question in posting this..... so maybe if you know you're socially awkward, you're just, well, socially awkward. Or shy, introverted, whatever. If you're autistic you likely wouldn't realize that?
I definitely would not be diagnosed myself based on the DSM IV stuff...that's much clearer than the quiz.

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#25 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 01:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sign language was useful, .
See, now THAT confuses me; as I understood it, Aspergers (SP?) comes with a large vocabulary? .... I've mostly ignored or skipped over aspie stuff for that reason in my reading, since DS has a delay in speech, quite the opposite. Sign language HAS been a huge help here, esp in the last couple weeks, he's learning signs now as fast as we can learn them. Being able to communicate definitely helps cut down on frustration, on both sides. We've had a few people telling us to quit signing and he'd start talking 'cause he'd have to; I've wondered whether we were doing the "right thing" or not w/ it; but now that he's learning so many of them I'm very glad we are.
Do autistic kids "turn into" aspie adults as they grow up, learn to talk, & learn some social rules?? (Does that ? even make sense?)


Quote:
It took me a VERY long time, a lot of heart ache, and a lot of help from some really good personal relationships to get to where I am today, maybe if I had figured out early on a way to chew-stim in a socially acceptable way, or maybe if I had learned to self medicate myself with caffeine earlier, or maybe if I had learned that I need to drown out distractions, and think of many things at once before the clarity singular concentration can happen, it would have been easier,
can you elaborate a little? Specifically, ANYthing that you think I may be able to use with / teach to my son that might save him any little bit of heartache or pain.... I know I can't "save him from the world" but ..... I certainly don't want him to have a more difficult time than average at the very least.
....How does the caffeine help? My mom gave my brother coffee instead of ritalin when the school wanted him labeled ADHD.....but we all feel like he really isn't ADD/ADHD at all, he's just very smart, and learned stuff quickly so he was able to do his schoolwork more quickly than most kids. And when he was done, like any boy, he didn't want to sit in his seat anymore. Just easier for teachers, if he's on a drug to make him act like a zombie, than to find something else for him to do. (and no, I'm NOT saying that's always the case, I think there are kids and adults who do need help....just that it's often overused)....
OTOH; I "need" coffee in the morning to ....the running joke in the family (me and my aunt both) are not "human" til after the first cup of coffee. Tried to "break the habit" lots of times but I'm always more social w/ it, so risk the health stuff associated in order to get along w/ everyone better. Especially work days.
What about the chewing thing? Do you mean ...you wish you'd learned to chew gum or something instead of hand flapping or similiar? Is that even possible?? Can you teach a child that without making them feel bad? (seems to be the debate for / against ABA, right?) We've been pretty successful w/ the vibrating teether or ice, to keep DS from biting his cheeks - that's a new habit though anyway, so ...? Haven't been doing that so much with the intention of teaching him something though, as to keep him from, well, biting his cheeks (he bit enough to bleed the other day; and I don't want that to continue or become a real habit)


Quote:
I can provide my parents with working rules to help them interact with my kids in a way they never could with me.
Care to share?

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That is what it means to be human though, humanity stands out in its ability to learn things collectively that cannot be learned in a single life time.
pure brilliance right there.




and feel free to write a book ....or whatever. ANYONE here. Looking for as much info as I can get my hands on....


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I don't think it's unusual to go your whole life and not realize until a child is diagnosed. I think that's somewhat common actually.
Really?? ... that seems, well, somewhat crazy to me. Maybe not so much in a case like above, where the parents know and hide it from the child, tell he grows up and figures it out himself. But to not have a clue at all??? Is that really commonplace?

Mom to A 11/06: Researching : to grow our family
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#26 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 01:57 PM
 
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Your Aspie score: 120 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 87 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits
I don't think I am Aspie, I have a lot of other diagnoses (OCD, ADD, social anxiety) that could also explain my non-NT behaviors.

I'm a modifiedartist.gif DH is a reading.gif we have 2 angel.gifs, and DS is a rainbow1284.gif baby.gif
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#27 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 01:59 PM
 
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My parents didn't seem to notice. They knew I was unusual. But I was a fantastic reader and identified as gifted in the early years( then had the gifted diagnosis taken away when I was in grade 5 or six) really clutzy but good at swimming. They thought I had some OCD type of behaviors and I hoarded food at one point. I had really bad anxiety that was misdiagnosed as asthma attacks (rolling eyes!) They were messed up themselves though and alcoholics so they didn't pay much attention. My step brother was diagnosed just a couple of years ago in his 30s with tourrettes. That went unnoticed as well.
Kids that were Aspie back in the 70's or 80s wouldn't have had any " box" that they fit into... we clearly didn't fit the stereotype of classic autism. we were just Seemingly intellegent kiddos with lots and lots of quirks. I just always got blamed for not trying hard enough... always treated like I was wasting potential. I was just considered quirky. It would be interesting to see what teachers really thought about me back then.

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#28 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 02:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
Care to share?
after many unsuccessful attemots at interacting with our kids peters parent finally asked us what could they be doing differently. it was tough cause i always kinda wanted them to work out their relationship on their own and didn't want to be a helicopter parent and tell them how to interact with their grandkids, but man, they needed help. last year before we visited in december we came up with a few things and man did it work. they were here a couple weeks ago and they are definately 2 of our kids fav people now. : before the "rules" every visit with them had ended in a meltdown from jet (since he was like 4 months old even). and marvel had never had anything to do with any of them - just clung to us the whole time refusing to make eye contact.

here's what we wrote -

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Also thanks for the interest in how to better interact with Jet and Marvel.

I will do Jet first cause he is the hardest.

Jet often mistakes enthusiasm for aggression. This means that if someone is excited to see him, he may think they are mad at him, which is very stressful for him. Jet responds very positivly to the strategy of letting him come to you. This doesn't mean that you must ignore him, just that you can't make a big deal about him or he can get really uncomfortable.

Item/gift recieving is uncomfortable for Jet. He does not accept things out of people's hands most of the time (like if I give him a hot dog, I am more successful if I just set it on the table and walk away, casually mentioning to him "There is a hotdog on the table for you" he will not respond, but later he will go and get the hotdog.) Of course, if he asks for something rather than you offering, it is ok to directly give it to him, but if he does not accept it, then it is best to set it down and let him know where it is.

iIlicited responses make Jet very uncomfortable. He is often unsure what the correct response is in a social situation, so he gets very nervous when someone makes it clear that he is supposed to respond. "Hi Jet" is fine, but "Hello Jet, hello? hello? hi? hey I am talking to you..." will send him running for the hills. Sometimes his responses to questions and greetings will come HOURS later, sometimes minutes later, sometimes never. It is ok to ask questions and to be friendly with greetings and such, but it is not ok to press for responses.

Blurted instructions to jet will not go over well. Even if positive. "Jet! go get your candy!" will get just as horrified a response as "Jet get off the kitchen table!". He will accept most instruction more readily if you explain the reasoning behind it. It is better if nobody besides andrea or I gives him direct "orders" even if they are positive ones.

Marvel

Marvel is extremely bothered by loud noises, off-key singing (like me and andrea's singing, she begs us to stop), bright lights are painful/frightening to her. Also loud/confusing conversations (like where many people are talking at once) can sometimes cause her to retreat.

Both kids actually love attention and affection, but it just takes them a loooong time to warm up. It is best to just let them be and hope they come to you.

Mama to Jet 6/05, Marvel 8/06 and Cash and Fox 2/09
Expecting Ada Marianne 11/14
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#29 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 02:20 PM
 
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That is what it means to be human though, humanity stands out in its ability to learn things collectively that cannot be learned in a single life time.
What you said is part of the gift aspies/people on the spectrum have. I don't think it's the high IQ (which so often goes with it), but a different way of seeing the world that would be lost if there were no aspies.

With all the heartbreak of trying to fit in, be "normal" and live in a NT world, it's so important to honor the strengths and gifts that come with it. Aspies are beautiful people with a depth that is sometimes astounding.

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#30 of 46 Old 11-19-2008, 03:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
Do autistic kids "turn into" aspie adults as they grow up, learn to talk, & learn some social rules?? (Does that ? even make sense?)
Many people are confused about speech delay and Asperger's because of some overly publicized generalizations... the DSM-IV states:
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DSM-IV:
There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years).
in other words, many kids that are considered to have profound speech delay, actually have "no clinically significant" delay.
This is why the youngest you can possibly get an Asperger's dx is age 3, this is one of the reasons PDD-WTF is so common, because if you do not meed criteria for Classic Autism, but you are not old enough to be dx Asperger, you will default to the "I dunno" diagnosis.

Also, with regard to Autistics "turning in to Aspies" when they grow up... Autism is still largely considered a childhood developmental disorder, Asperger's has a bit better PR, so it is the natural course of events. Since there is a spectrum, and the spectrum is measured largely by skill level, it only makes sense that one would be able progress, the traits that do not have to do with skill level, should not be considered "lower" or "higher", but the fact remains that many people think of/define aspergers as a "higher functioning" autism, and I would expect most people are "higher functioning" as they mature.


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....How does the caffeine help?
Caffeine works for me like a mild ADD medication, with better-known side-effects. It speeds up my heart rate, and helps me focus.
Before I discovered caffeine, I discovered that I could do my math homework significantly faster if I had to pee, so I would chug water and intentionally hold it in so that I could blast through my math work. I know now the science behind what I was doing. Men particularly, have higher blood pressure and pulse when their bladder is full. Effectively speeding your whole body up.


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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
What about the chewing thing? Do you mean ...you wish you'd learned to chew gum or something instead of hand flapping or similiar? Is that even possible?? Can you teach a child that without making them feel bad? (seems to be the debate for / against ABA, right?) We've been pretty successful w/ the vibrating teether or ice, to keep DS from biting his cheeks - that's a new habit though anyway, so ...? Haven't been doing that so much with the intention of teaching him something though, as to keep him from, well, biting his cheeks (he bit enough to bleed the other day; and I don't want that to continue or become a real habit)
The chewing and sign language thing are inter-related I have motor problems with my mouth if I do not properly stimulate and exercise it, if I do not, I tend to slur, studder, stammor, and trip over words. When I was little, I was punnished and shamed for chewing on my shirts, it worked to break me of the habit, but it greatly stifled my physical ability to speak, even though I had plenty of mental capacity for it. I was self conscious about it, so I stopped talking unless absolutly necessary, 3rd grade sign language afforded me a more comfortable means to make my needs known.

Later in life, I unconsciously discovered that if I constantly ate chewey candy, I could flirt and talk and articulate... I got a job at a candy store, and constantly carried gummi candy with me all throughout high school. I switched to Mentos in college, still I am famous for having insane amounts of candy all the time... nowadays I chew "Trident White" before every business meeting, the candy has done havoc on my teeth, but I would not be where I am today without it.

I would not try to stop a stim or substitute one, I would try of offer a more effective means of accomplishing the stim. "If you like chewing shirts, wait till you discover the accompanying shock of a pepermint blast from chewing gum." Rather than "Here lets hide your shame, no shirt chewing allowed, only gum." It is a difference in attitude, focusing on helping the person deal with themselves, rather than focusing on dealing with how other people see them. Many "make em look normal" therapies fail miserably because of the simple fact that many Autistic people REALLY DON'T CARE how other people see them.

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Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
and feel free to write a book ....or whatever. ANYONE here. Looking for as much info as I can get my hands on....
I am working on it, but it is currently back burner to my NanoWriMo novel.
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