Anyone with snake knowledge? - Mothering Forums

 
Thread Tools
#1 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 03:51 PM - Thread Starter
A&A
 
A&A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 16,212
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Does a very distinctive rattle sound (in high grass, near potential squirrels to eat) always mean a rattlesnake?

Or, is there some sort of non-poisonous, totally harmless snake that also produces a rattle? (Hoping against hope. )

Otherwise a rattlesnake has decided to make our garden/pasture area his/her home. :

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
A&A is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 03:57 PM
 
North_Of_60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Posts: 7,108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you hear a rattle, it's probably rattlesnake. What KIND of rattler it is would worry me. If you're anywhere where there are eastern or diamond backs, don't mess around. Call someone in to catch it. Otherwise a long stick and a pillow case will work, then release it somewhere else. They're good to have in your ecosystem, though I would NOT feel comfortable living close to an easter/western diamond back (or even a mohave).

http://www.pestproducts.com/rattlesnakes.htm

Frankenstein never scared me. Marsupials do. Because they're FAST.
North_Of_60 is offline  
#3 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 03:59 PM
 
SevenVeils's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lurking in my Lerkim
Posts: 6,418
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Gopher snakes will rapidly shake their tail to imitate the sound of a rattler. In addition, they look a lot alike.

There are two ways that I have checked this. I am not advising that you do the same.

I have used a LONG stick and gotten the snake to bite or strike. Rattlers have a distinctive triangle shaped head, most defined when striking.

If you can get a very clear look at the end of the tail you can tell. Rattles look really obvious, but make sure that if there are no rattles, the tail comes to a clean point. Otherwise, if it ends bluntly it could still be a rattler whose tail has been injured (rattles cut off or something).
SevenVeils is offline  
 
#4 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 04:12 PM - Thread Starter
A&A
 
A&A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 16,212
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post
If you hear a rattle, it's probably rattlesnake. What KIND of rattler it is would worry me. If you're anywhere where there are eastern or diamond backs, don't mess around. Call someone in to catch it. Otherwise a long stick and a pillow case will work, then release it somewhere else. They're good to have in your ecosystem, though I would NOT feel comfortable living close to an easter/western diamond back (or even a mohave).

http://www.pestproducts.com/rattlesnakes.htm
I live in Northern Utah. I have no idea what kind of snakes are here!
We have two acres.......it could move anywhere on the two acres by the time I call somebody out! We live in a really strange mix of suburban/urban/rural area! So some of the other neighbors have fields, as well, but a lot of them don't.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
A&A is offline  
#5 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 04:13 PM - Thread Starter
A&A
 
A&A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 16,212
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyastara View Post
Gopher snakes will rapidly shake their tail to imitate the sound of a rattler. In addition, they look a lot alike.

There are two ways that I have checked this. I am not advising that you do the same.

I have used a LONG stick and gotten the snake to bite or strike. Rattlers have a distinctive triangle shaped head, most defined when striking.

If you can get a very clear look at the end of the tail you can tell. Rattles look really obvious, but make sure that if there are no rattles, the tail comes to a clean point. Otherwise, if it ends bluntly it could still be a rattler whose tail has been injured (rattles cut off or something).
It was in tall grass; I didn't want to get close enough to look at the tail! It was a VERY distinctive, "rattler" type sound, though. Kind of weird it was in the daytime--I thought they slept during the day, mostly.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
A&A is offline  
#6 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 04:46 PM
 
SevenVeils's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lurking in my Lerkim
Posts: 6,418
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've heard both kinds, up close and far away and I wouldn't discount the possibility that it is a gopher snake. Either way, of course be careful out there. Whether this is or isn't a rattler, if they live in your area there could be others. Or none
SevenVeils is offline  
#7 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 05:36 PM
 
cristeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 14,677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I love excuses to learn something new.

http://www.fresnochaffeezoo.com/anim...tleSnakes.html
Quote:
Rattlers are basically nocturnal and their vertical cat-eye pupils are an adaptation allowing the pupil aperture to close tighter during the brightness of daylight.

The characteristic hissing buzz that anyone who has heard rattlers recognizes needs five or more rattles. Depending on the temperature and how alarmed the snake is, the rattler may vibrate its tail at as many as 100 cycles per second.

Because the females are secretive during gestation in mid-summer, incidences of snake encounter are much more likely to be with males.
http://www.mountaintimes.com/mtweekl...tlesnakes.php3
Quote:
Capturing nuisance snakes and moving them a long distance from the point of capture isn’t good for the snake and isn’t necessary for keeping the snake from returning to a campsite or a homeowner’s yard. Ideally, Sealy says, snakes should only be moved 100 yards or less and never more than 200 yards from the point of capture. His research shows that the snake will not return to the capture area; likely the memory of the occurrence is enough to keep it well away.

Rattlesnakes are not aggressive but are very defensive. Sealy says that the rattlesnake in its natural habitat considers itself hidden from view. “When faced with a large animal such as a bear, deer or human,” Sealy says, “they’ll just sit still.” If that doesn’t work and they feel threatened, they’ll coil and rattle, Sealy explains, but the rattle is a defensive mechanism and not an attack signal.

Cristeen ~ Always remembering our stillheart.gif  warrior ~ Our rainbow1284.gif  is 3, how'd that happen?!?! 

We welcomed another rainbow1284.gifstillheart.gif  warrior in May 2012!! 

2012 Decluttering challenge - 575/2012

cristeen is offline  
#8 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 06:12 PM
 
dawn1221's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Squanderville
Posts: 1,547
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry for my bias but I detest reptiles in general but snakes specifically. I would call someone ASAP.

Just recently, at a celebrities house here in Malibu, a worker was bitten by a rattler. He almost died.

Snakes are my worst fear ever. I don't think I would ever leave my house again if I suspected they could be "out there".
dawn1221 is offline  
#9 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 07:19 PM
 
cristeen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 14,677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawn1221 View Post
Snakes are my worst fear ever. I don't think I would ever leave my house again if I suspected they could be "out there".
I'm sorry, I know you didn't mean it that way, but that just made me giggle. If you live in California, no suspicion is necessary... they're "out there". It's just a matter of where and when.

Cristeen ~ Always remembering our stillheart.gif  warrior ~ Our rainbow1284.gif  is 3, how'd that happen?!?! 

We welcomed another rainbow1284.gifstillheart.gif  warrior in May 2012!! 

2012 Decluttering challenge - 575/2012

cristeen is offline  
#10 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 07:21 PM
 
JessicaS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 42,757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Bull snakes make quite a fuss. They will hiss and vibrate thier tail on the ground trying to convince you they are a VERY VENEMOUS SNAKE!


They are very common and make good pets.

A Bull Snake is in the same genus as the Gopher and Pine snake. I would try and get a glimpse of it.

I don't know if they are nocturnal..but I wouldn't think so, I have only seen Bull Snakes during the day.

I would try and get a glimpse, do you know anyone with protective boots that could try and see the snake or get a pic?

If it is one of those snakes..IMO you will want to keep it on your land..they eat rodents.

Here is a gallery

http://www.pituophis.org/gallery.htm

Not all those who wander are lost 
JessicaS is offline  
#11 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 07:48 PM
 
dawn1221's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Squanderville
Posts: 1,547
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post
I'm sorry, I know you didn't mean it that way, but that just made me giggle. If you live in California, no suspicion is necessary... they're "out there". It's just a matter of where and when.

You had to go and say that now didn't you....

Meanie.

I was trying to convince myself they didn't live in my suburban town.
dawn1221 is offline  
#12 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 07:49 PM
 
JessicaS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 42,757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawn1221 View Post
You had to go and say that now didn't you....

Meanie.

I was trying to convince myself they didn't live in my suburban town.
There are completely harmless snakes in California too They eat pests, snakes are good! Good snakes!

Not all those who wander are lost 
JessicaS is offline  
#13 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 08:29 PM
 
momto l&a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Idaho
Posts: 13,099
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Rattlesnakes aren't strictly nocturnal!!

The ones I have seen are all day time.

We shot one a month ago near our front door. The only reason we knew he was there was because of his rattle.
momto l&a is offline  
#14 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 08:40 PM
 
katheek77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Could be a snake with maracas...:
katheek77 is offline  
#15 of 15 Old 06-29-2007, 09:29 PM - Thread Starter
A&A
 
A&A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 16,212
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
My dh is trying to convince me that some sort of grasshopper makes a rattle sound. (I think he's a dork. )

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
A&A is offline  
Reply


User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Online Users: 2,138

10 members and 2,128 guests
Brinkley18 , Emma Brown , emmy526 , Hyacinthe , IceFlake , jillyjelly , Realdeal , Rpierce2985 , sarrahlnorris , Xarokiga
Most users ever online was 21,860, 06-22-2018 at 08:45 PM.