Bacterial Vaginosis - Mothering Forums
 
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#1 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 12:04 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I have been diagonosed as having this and encouraged by my OB to undergo a series of antobiotics that have a warning about the first trimester.

I found this article and other simlar articles:

http://www.midwife.org/prof/display.cfm?id=260

does anyone have any info on this? I am not sure what to do.
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#2 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 12:09 AM
 
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I had BV that resulted in ptl. Is there some other antibiotic that you can take that is safe in the 1st trimester? Seems odd that the dr would recommend one that wasn't.

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#3 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 01:33 PM
 
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get a second opinion- BV is frequently treated during pregnancy to prevent preterm labor, and there should be several safe options.

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#4 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 02:50 PM
 
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I had bacterial vaginosis during my 2nd pregnancy. We detected it at 15 weeks,and I miscarried about a week later. The ob talked about suspecting that the BV was actually the cause of the miscarriage. I am not sure how I feel about that, but I would definitely urge you to gather some information before you decide whether or not to get treated. It might be important to treat it, if indeed it can lead to miscarriage. Get a second opinion as soon as possible, is my opinion!

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#5 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 04:42 PM
 
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I had a bad yeast infection and trace of BV during pregnancy. I believe I had the most of my pregnancy. I didnt detect it until almost 9 months. I went into labor before it was treated. I was full - term 39 weeks. Both infections cleared up on their own after labor, PH changed. I was going to treat them both naturally, no antibiotics.
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#6 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 06:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I did get a second opinoin from someone and they said I was right, that I should NOT take the first meds prescribed. She also said lets wait a week and do a culture, in the mean time I am taking acidopholus supplements.
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#7 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 06:51 PM
 
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THere are some herbal treatments you can try. I don't have the list right now, but I know nettle tea, garlic, and extra vitamin C are all helpful. You may be able to find more info in the Health and Healing forum, try a search for Bacterial Vaginitis, or BV.
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#8 of 22 Old 03-26-2005, 07:51 PM
 
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If it doesn't go away quickly, there are many more safe options to treat in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters.

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#9 of 22 Old 04-08-2005, 07:15 PM
 
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I was just perusing this forum and earlier today I was flipping through some rather pro-intervention book (don't remember what book) and according to that book it doesn't make sense to screen for BV without symptoms (did you have any?) and it didn't seem to make a case for treating it in either case. Given that the book was rather pro-intervention, I would probably skip the antibiotics, but I don't know anything about BV other than flipping through this random book.
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#10 of 22 Old 04-08-2005, 09:21 PM
 
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One of the easiest treatments for BV is hydrogen peroxide washes. Because most BV is from gardnerella - a bacteria that hates oxygen - it works well. Seriously.

It's cheap, there are no side effects and it really works.

I suggest a couple glugs of Hydrogen Peroxide in an 8oz squirt bottle. Fill the rest with water. Open the outer and inner labia, squirt just inside the vagina and all around between the outer & inner labia. Do this three times a day.

All it takes is about four days of this treatment to completely clear it up. If you're worried about it returning, start taking probiotics. Get your system cleared up and healthy and you won't have an isssue with it. Taking antibiotics, however, will only make it worse, including increasing your chance of yeast infections and antibiotic-resistent bacteria that is stronger.
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#11 of 22 Old 04-09-2005, 02:29 AM
 
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What probiotics would you reccomend, pamamidwife, for someone trying to avoid yeast and BV during a second pregnancy (had it during my first)?
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#12 of 22 Old 04-09-2005, 03:24 AM
 
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Here is a brand that I hear ALOT of good things about: http://www.mercola.com/forms/primal_defense.htm

There are many different types - your local health food store is a good place to start.
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#13 of 22 Old 04-09-2005, 12:13 PM
 
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I have had it when not pregnant and recieved an antibiotic. Then I got the yeast infection! So I dunno! I have some kind of PH imbalance now that seems to be coming and going. So I have been eating a lot of yogurt. (suppose to help? ) Oh and don't forget Air? Just good old air! But for me I'm 30weeks pregnant I'm sure I could recieve treatment if I wanted to tell the ob but I don't want to if its something I can deal with. Plus its been like 4 days since I felt any discomfort. So I think something worked!
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#14 of 22 Old 04-09-2005, 05:10 PM
 
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I had BV during my pregnancy. It resulted in PTL at 32 weeks. I was in the hospital until 33 and a half and under went a series of antibiotics as well as a mess of other things - one for the BV, 1 for GBS, Mag Sulphate for the PTL as well as another I forget the name of, (not to mention diuretics to get rid of the water in my lungs caused my the mag! ughh) and steriod shots in my rear for 2 days.
If I could have gotten away with just clearing up the BV, I would have gladly done it!

After all of that, DS did arrive one day before his due date.
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#15 of 22 Old 04-10-2005, 01:13 AM
 
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What are the symptoms of BV? And does it cause miscarriage?


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#16 of 22 Old 04-10-2005, 04:20 AM
 
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http://www.cdc.gov/std/BV/STDFact-Ba...s.htm#Symptoms

I don't know if it would cause miscarriage necessarily. I suppose it's not out of the realm of possibility. ?
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#17 of 22 Old 04-10-2005, 02:49 PM
 
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WOW that is scary! Maybe I should tell them! But they will most likely want to put me on some kind of antibiotic and that bothers me! They put me on something for headaches that later the pharmacist told me he would not want me taking until the first trimester was over! So I try to steer clear of telling them anything!
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#18 of 22 Old 05-02-2005, 10:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife
One of the easiest treatments for BV is hydrogen peroxide washes. Because most BV is from gardnerella - a bacteria that hates oxygen - it works well. Seriously.

It's cheap, there are no side effects and it really works.

I suggest a couple glugs of Hydrogen Peroxide in an 8oz squirt bottle. Fill the rest with water. Open the outer and inner labia, squirt just inside the vagina and all around between the outer & inner labia. Do this three times a day.

All it takes is about four days of this treatment to completely clear it up. If you're worried about it returning, start taking probiotics. Get your system cleared up and healthy and you won't have an isssue with it. Taking antibiotics, however, will only make it worse, including increasing your chance of yeast infections and antibiotic-resistent bacteria that is stronger.
Pamamidwife, I have been trying this treatment for the last few weeks and it has not cleared up my BV. It does help with the odour a little though Is there anything else you would recommend> I have been fighting BV since I was pregnant with my first DS (four years ago)
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#19 of 22 Old 05-02-2005, 10:15 PM
 
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Please anyone who have BV, or thinks they might, get in to see your midwife/DR and get treated. I lost my daughter at 22 weeks to Chorioamnionitis. BV if untreated can move past your cervix and infect your chorion lining, amniotic sac, placenta, umbilical cord and baby. Most of the time it causes PTL, but it can also cause fetal demise. It isn't worth the risk. I understand not wanting to take unsafe antibiotics, but if that is the case get out a find a Dr to prescribe safe antibiotics. This is a very serious condition.

Alright I am off my soapbox now. Sorry if that came off as harsh, but I don't want any of you to lose your babies the way I lost mine.
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#20 of 22 Old 05-03-2005, 11:06 AM
 
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I have had BV twice when I was not pregnant and the first time I treated it with a prescription my MW gave me after I had tried all of the natural treatments. It was not an antibiotic since I am very afraid of taking them since I have a severe pennicillin allergy. She gave me Flagyll and it cleared right up with in a couple of days. The second time I wanted to avoid taking a prescription so I talked to my friend who is a MW as well and she recommended iodine douches. I am normally not a fan of douching but it worked in about 4 days. Just one douche a day and it restored the PH balance and I had relief. I never douche so I was wary about it but it worked so well that if I start experiencing symptoms ever again, I am going that route first. I don't know about douching in pregnancy but you could ask Pamamidwife what she thinks or call your doctor.

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#21 of 22 Old 05-03-2005, 11:51 AM
 
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There are some natural treatment options here:

http://www.marilynglenville.com/general/infections.htm
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#22 of 22 Old 05-04-2005, 12:48 AM
 
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after you use the hydrogen peroxide use lactobacillus to re-establish healthy flora I like Nature's way brand lactbacillus that has reuteri and rahamnosis and acidopholus it has been studied and survives being in capsules and then creating a live colony in the body. also eating foods that are fermented there are a couple of cook books out on how to make and eat fermented foods.
the thing with the right kind of lactobacillus is that it produces its own peroxide which helps to keep the other critters down--- lots of studies on BV and other infections triggering labor probably has to do with the type of irritation and prostaglandins that they end up triggering production of-- also there is some relationship to gum disease and preterm labor again cytokines here are a couple of abstracts there are several that relate look on pub med

J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Jan;32(1):176-86.

Bacterial vaginosis and vaginal microorganisms in idiopathic premature labor and
association with pregnancy outcome.

Holst E, Goffeng AR, Andersch B.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Lund University, Sweden.

The vaginal microflora of 49 women in idiopathic preterm labor was compared with
that of 38 term controls to determine whether the presence of bacterial
vaginosis (BV) and/or specific microorganisms would influence the rate of
preterm delivery. Demographic factors, pregnancy outcome, and reproductive
history were also studied. BV, as defined by the presence of clue cells in a
vaginal wet mount and characteristic microbial findings in a stained vaginal
smear and vaginal culture, was more common in women with preterm labor and
delivery than in controls (P < 0.01). The condition, diagnosed in 41% of women
who had both preterm labor and delivery (n = 22) and in 11% each of women who
had preterm labor but term delivery (n = 27) and controls, was associated with a
2.1-fold risk (95% confidence intervals, 1.2 to 3.7) for preterm birth prior to
37 weeks of gestation. BV was associated with low birth weight. Of 49 women with
preterm labor, 67% (8 of 12) of women with BV were delivered of low-birth-weight
neonates (< 2,500 g) compared with 22% (8 of 37) of women without the condition
(P < 0.0005). The presence of hydrogen peroxide-producing facultative
Lactobacillus spp. was strongly negatively associated with both preterm delivery
and BV. BV-associated microorganisms, i.e., Mobiluncus, Prevotella, and
Peptostreptococcus species, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, Fusobacterium
nucleatum, Mycoplasma hominis, and high numbers of Gardnerella vaginalis were
significantly associated with preterm delivery; all species also strongly
associated with BV (P = 0.0001 for each comparison). Mobiluncus curtisii and
Fusobacterium nucleatum were recovered exclusively from women with preterm
delivery. Our study clearly indicates that BV and its associated organisms are
correlated with idiopathic premature delivery.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ann Periodontol. 1998 Jul;3(1):222-32.

Preterm birth: associations with genital and possibly oral microflora.

Hill GB.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham,
NC, USA. [email protected]

Opportunistic pathogenic microbes are indigenous to the female lower genital
tract and etiologic in many types of pelvic infections and, apparently, a
portion of preterm birth (PTB) cases. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a clinical
syndrome based on an altered genital microflora in which Gardnerella vaginalis;
anaerobic species primarily among Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Bacteroides,
Peptostreptococcus, and Mobiluncus; Mycoplasma hominis; and Ureaplasma
urealyticum become predominant in vaginal secretions. This BV complex of
microbes, compared to a normal vaginal microflora dominated by facultative
lactobacilli, is associated with significantly increased risks for preterm
labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, PTB, and other perinatal
infectious complications. Pathogenetic mechanisms include an ascending route of
infection and/or inflammatory process due to microbial products and maternal
and/or fetal response(s) with production of prostaglandins and cytokines. In the
presence of periodontal disease, oral opportunistic pathogens and/or their
inflammatory products also may have a role in prematurity via a hematogenous
route. Fusobacterium nucleatum, a common oral species, is the most frequently
isolated species from amniotic fluid cultures among women with preterm labor and
intact membranes. Also, the species and subspecies of fusobacteria identified
from amniotic fluid most closely match those reported from healthy and diseased
subgingival sites, namely F. nucleatum subspecies vincentii and F. nucleatum
subspecies nucleatum, compared to strains identified from the lower genital
tract. Although these fusobacteria also could be acquired through cunnilingus
from a partner, new data associating maternal periodontal disease with preterm
low birth weight taken with the isolation of F. nucleatum, Capnocytophaga, and
other oral species from amniotic fluid support further study of a possible
additional route, oral-hematogenous, to PTB.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
nfect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jun;12(2):79-85.

Differential vaginal expression of interleukin-1 system cytokines in the
presence of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in pregnant women.

Doh K, Barton PT, Korneeva I, Perni SC, Bongiovanni AM, Tuttle SL, Skupski DW,
Witkin SS.

Division of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021,
USA.

OBJECTIVE: The genital mycoplasmas, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma
hominis, are commonly identified in the vagina of healthy pregnant women.
However, these microorganisms are the most common isolates from the amniotic
fluids of women in preterm labor. The mechanisms responsible for vaginal
colonization and ascent to the uterus remain undetermined. We evaluated the
association between U. urealyticum and M. hominis vaginal colonization and the
presence of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory interleukin-1 system
components in asymptomatic pregnant women of different ethnicities. METHODS:
Vaginal specimens, obtained from 224 first trimester pregnant women, were
assayed for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra)
concentrations by ELISA. U. urealyticum and M. hominis vaginal colonization were
identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: Vaginal colonization
with M. hominis was identified in 37 (16.5%) women, and was more prevalent in
black (18.9%) and Hispanic (20.9%) than in white (4.2%) women (p = 0.01). U.
urealyticum was present in 84 (37.5%) women and there was no ethnic disparity in
its detection. M. hominis colonization was associated with elevated median
vaginal IL-1beta concentrations in both black women (p = 0.02) and Hispanic
women (p = 0.04), and was unrelated to vaginal IL-1ra concentrations. In marked
contrast, U. urealyticum colonization was associated with elevations in vaginal
IL-1ra levels, but not with IL-1beta concentrations, in black women (p = 0.02)
and Hispanic women (p < 0.0001) and marginally in white women (p = 0.06).
CONCLUSION: M. hominis colonization in healthy pregnant women is associated with
localized pro-inflammatory immune activation, while U. urealyticum colonization
is associated with immune suppression.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Med Wieku Rozwoj. 2003 Jul-Sep;7(3 Suppl 1):211-6.

[Association between genital mycoplasmas and risk of preterm delivery]

[Article in Polish]

Wasiela M, Krzeminski Z, Hanke W, Kalinka J.

Zaklad Mikrobiologii Lekarskiej, Katedra Mikrobiologii, Uniwersytet Medyczny w
Lodzi.

The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of maternal
colonisation by genital mycoplasmas during pregnancy and to assess its
association with preterm delivery. The cervical swabs of 179 pregnant women
between 8 and 16 week of gestation were cultured for Mycoplasma hominis and
Ureaplasma urealyticum. Clinical details and perinatal outcomes were documented.
Of a total of 179 women enrolled, 68 (38.0%) had positive cervical culture for
genital mycoplasmas; 30 (16.7%) for M. hominis and 38 (21.3%) for U.
urealyticum. Preterm delivery occurred in 21 (11.7%) women. Genital mycoplasmas
were found more frequently in group with preterm delivery as compare to women
who delivered at term (p = 0.05) and its presence at lower genital tract at
early pregnancy was a risk factor of preterm delivery. Early pregnancy screening
for genital mycoplasmas and following treatment may reduce the rate of preterm
deliveries.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Clin Infect Dis. 1993 Jun;16 Suppl 4:S273-81.

The normal vaginal flora, H2O2-producing lactobacilli, and bacterial vaginosis
in pregnant women.

Hillier SL, Krohn MA, Rabe LK, Klebanoff SJ, Eschenbach DA.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle
98195.

In this study of the vaginal flora of 171 pregnant women in labor at term, the
flora was categorized as normal (Lactobacillus predominant), intermediate, or
representative of bacterial vaginosis (BV) on the basis of a vaginal smear. BV
was diagnosed in 39 women (23%); the vaginal flora was classified as normal in
50% of cases and as intermediate in 27%. H2O2-producing lactobacilli were
recovered from 5% of women with BV, 37% of those with an intermediate flora, and
61% of those with a normal flora. H2O2-negative lactobacilli were equally
frequent (57%-65%) in all three groups. The microorganisms most frequently
recovered from women with BV included Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella
bivia/disiens, Bacteroides ureolyticus, Prevotella corporis/Bacteroides levii,
Fusobacterium nucleatum, Mobiluncus species, Peptostreptococcus prevotii,
Peptostreptococcus tetradius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, viridans
streptococci, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Mycoplasma hominis (P < .05 for each).
The presence of all but three of these organisms was inversely related to
vaginal colonization by H2O2-producing lactobacilli; the exceptions were B.
ureolyticus, F. nucleatum, and P. prevotii. Other microorganisms were equally
frequent among women with and without BV. We conclude that specific groups of
anaerobes are associated with BV in this population and that a strong
association exists between species associated with BV and those inhibited by
H2O2-producing lactobacilli.
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