Is Himalayan salt a scam??? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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#31 of 48 Old 01-12-2014, 06:56 PM
 
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To DoubleDouble

 

DoubleDouble says that "Salt is Natrium and Chloride".  OMG 11th grade chemistry comes to mind and Na stands for Sodium NOT Natrium.  Maybe he/she never got that far.  Please all readers skip this persons post because he/she is uneducated at best and an unkind word at the worst.  Other posts are good but not that one.

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#32 of 48 Old 01-12-2014, 07:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mikepidd View Post

To DoubleDouble

DoubleDouble says that "Salt is Natrium and Chloride".  OMG 11th grade chemistry comes to mind and Na stands for Sodium NOT Natrium.  Maybe he/she never got that far.  Please all readers skip this persons post because he/she is uneducated at best and an unkind word at the worst.  Other posts are good but not that one.

[sigh] I'll say it again, shall I, sodium and natrium are two words for the same element. Natrium is Latin, sodium is Greek but both refer to the same element.
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#33 of 48 Old 01-13-2014, 09:33 AM
 
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Lol. The shortcut for sodium is.... Drumroll.... Na. Natrium. Natrium= sodium. Many languages use Natrium. Eg Germans call salt Natriumchlorid.
What English speakers call potassium is called Kalium in German. Hence K=Kalium = potassium. Neither word is wrong.
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#34 of 48 Old 02-04-2014, 08:57 AM
 
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The Himalayas are in Pakistan.

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#35 of 48 Old 02-15-2014, 07:01 AM
 
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It seems as though this conversation about Himalayan salt (and other unprocessed kinds of table salt) is intended to be useful for people who want to decide what to buy, and people do ask for real information here periodically.  But it also seems as though the conversation gets derailed by arguments that aren't relevant to those concerns.  Also: when people become too intent on discrediting one another, the subject is in danger of becoming someone's tone or state of mind rather than any concerns they've raised and whether they're worth considering.

 

At this point, I don't know that *extremely unlikely* claims about noncommercial table salts are useful to explore.  "It's in our DNA" is a cliche that most of us don't need to think about beyond noting that saying so on a health forum is like saying "It's all relative" to a physicist. 

 

What I'd find more useful personally is information on claims that one of my doctors made -- claims that don't address the virtues of Celtic sea salt and Himalayan salt *separately* but put them in a better category than standard iodized salt *generally*.

 

My doctor says that the standard table salt we buy at the grocery store is refined, bleached and coated with a chemical that keeps the granules separate, and that those are the problems with standard table salt:  fewer minerals, more processing and more chemicals. 

 

The aim of using Celtic and Himalayan salts, he says, is not to offer miraculous health results (though he claims anecdotal results with high blood pressure, which I happen to have) but to reduce exposure to chemicals and include more natural mineral content.  He also says that using powdered kelp instead of salt is a good idea.

 

Has anyone proved or disproved his claims?  Are these benefits demonstrable or not?  That's what I'd like to know.

 

People have talked about pseudo-blog pages which are commercial and extol the virtues of Himalayan salt.  That is absolutely true, as five minutes' Googling or Duck Duck Going will prove. 

 

But I would add that there are also many pseudo-blogs and articles by the commercial salt industry as well. In one case, there's even blowback regarding an irrelevant claim for Himalayan sea salt by a pseudo-blog dedicated to discrediting people who oppose GMO.  On that site, the red herring raised by Himalania Pink Sea Salt's marketing -- that it is "non-GMO" (an amusing claim for a substance that was never a living organism and doesn't issue from one) -- is used to discredit both the nutritional value of the salt itself and masses of people who seeks to avoid GMO food generally, which the blog calls "the anti-GMO crowd" (as if there's a *grassroots pro-GMO movement* -- as if anyone uninvolved with Monsanto et al.'s marketing and lobbying campaigns ever characterized people who opposed GMO as delusional fanatics).  Yes, that's shady marketing, but the hidden claims and euphemisms used to market conventional grocery items is at least as shady. 

 

At this point, it's less useful to me to care about marketing claims made for gourmet salts -- or claims of a "scam" by alarmists and rivals -- than to acquire independent information about reasonable benefits and dangers.

 

I haven't, for example, seen anything to suggest that the radiation scare around Himalayan salt is credible.  What I'd like more information about is the circumstances and conditions under which it's harvested, and not only the same analysis of its contents linked to over and over (not only on this thread, but everywhere on the web) as much as an article by a credible independent scientist who can explain the possible benefits, dangers and placebo effect of the exact proportions shown in that table.

 

A short note about sources:

 

The reason I distrust Wikipedia on the subject of gourmet salt is because I've noticed that people from the food industry will completely rewrite entries that were originally useful in order to market the alleged benefits by promoting them pseudo-officially.  If you look at the history of the Wikipedia entry on yerba mate, for example, you'll notice that, as time goes on, the entry excludes more and more evidence about carcinogens and becomes increasingly complimentary.  You'll also notice that the objections raised to studies that find higher incidences of throat cancer are questioned in the notes in quibbling ways that suggest the writer might intend to discredit or disinclude valid research.

 

I mention the yerba mate entry because I used to love it and was originally alerted to the dangers of drinking it by a blog by a writer for Scientific American that was featured on the PLOS blogs, which are written by independent science writers who are often actual scientists. 

 

I noticed the same issue when checking the history of the entry on kombucha:  Earlier versions of the article were less complimentary and more objective.

 

When looking at an entry on any food that is marketed commercially, I think it is nearly always important to sign in to Wikipedia and look at the history of the article. See for yourself whether important information has been deleted or modified.  Decide for yourself whether, based on the nature and quality of the information, the aim was greater accuracy or better marketing.

 

And finally, one irrelevant observation:

 

It's good to know a little Latin whether or not the language is officially dead.  Since our English vocabulary contains a number of Latin-derived words, a little familiarity with the subject probably wouldn't hurt. 

 

But there's no reason to use an opponent's knowledge of Latin as proof (or Latinate prose style as disproof) of the validity of their thoughts about table salt!

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#36 of 48 Old 02-15-2014, 07:06 AM
 
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All I can say is that American store is nasty. I don't want iodine nor anti caking chemicals. I like the pink salt. I like sea salt though I'm concerned with the amount of pollution in today's world.
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#37 of 48 Old 02-15-2014, 07:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nia82 View Post

All I can say is that American store is nasty. I don't want iodine nor anti caking chemicals. I like the pink salt. I like sea salt though I'm concerned with the amount of pollution in today's world.


I have those same concerns, nia82.  I'm looking into this because my doctor has said that Himalayan salt is free of those problems (as is Celtic sea salt). He mentioned the absence of added fluoride as a virtue as well. 

 

My question is whether these health benefits are demonstrable in terms of evidence, and whether any claims of the supposed dangers of using Himalayan salt (beyond the caveat that salt should be consumed in moderation) are supported by reasonably analyzed facts.

 

I certainly don't want to make anyone feel less happy about their purchases (or falsely reassured, for that matter).  I'm only interested in what's true.

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#38 of 48 Old 02-15-2014, 11:42 AM
 
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Meh I think it's just salt.
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#39 of 48 Old 03-24-2014, 06:45 PM
 
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Quote:
 I mention the yerba mate entry because I used to love it and was originally alerted to the dangers of drinking it by a blog by a writer for Scientific American that was featured on the PLOS blogs, which are written by independent science writers who are often actual scientists. 
 
I noticed the same issue when checking the history of the entry on kombucha:  Earlier versions of the article were less complimentary and more objective.
 
When looking at an entry on any food that is marketed commercially, I think it is nearly always important to sign in to Wikipedia and look at the history of the article. See for yourself whether important information has been deleted or modified.  Decide for yourself whether, based on the nature and quality of the information, the aim was greater accuracy or better marketing.

Great post! Thanks for the links to the PLOS blogs, that's the kind of thing I've been looking for. I'm so tired of seeing misinformation everywhere. But I don't know where to look to get some real answers. In an age where we can know exactly what is in our food, you'd think it would be easier to know what to eat without so much BS. Also, thank you for the important tip about Wikipedia entry histories. That will be very interesting to read.

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#40 of 48 Old 09-10-2014, 10:21 AM
 
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I just read the original blog post (http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=115738) and I can, in my heart say that this guy is a quack and appears to like getting people riled up for no good reason.
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#41 of 48 Old 01-17-2017, 10:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by syoung View Post
<p>So is it a scam or not? (confused)</p>
Yes. It is a scam. It's so similar to table salt as to be almost identical. It contains iron oxide to give it a pink colour.
Salt is not contained in your DNA, as someone on here has suggested.
I have read about "Sole Drinks" on other boards. These drinks are laughable. Don't do it. Waste of time and waste of salt. We should be eating LESS salt not drinking salt water and thinking it's magical.
Good old white table salt sodium chloride is fine and cheap. Buy Himalayan salt if you wish but it's 4 times the price.
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#42 of 48 Old 01-17-2017, 10:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Fnaphither View Post
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/community/t/1186148/is-himalayan-salt-a-scam/20#post_17570743" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">Quote:
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nia82</strong> <a href="/community/t/1186148/is-himalayan-salt-a-scam/20#post_17570743"><img alt="View Post" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
All I can say is that American store is nasty. I don't want iodine nor anti caking chemicals. I like the pink salt. I like sea salt though I'm concerned with the amount of pollution in today's world.</div>
</div>
<p><br>
I have those same concerns, nia82.  I'm looking into this because my doctor has said that Himalayan salt is free of those problems (as is Celtic sea salt). He mentioned the absence of added fluoride as a virtue as well. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>My question is whether these health benefits are demonstrable in terms of evidence, and whether any claims of the supposed dangers of using Himalayan salt (beyond the caveat that salt should be consumed in moderation) are supported by reasonably analyzed facts.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I certainly don't want to make anyone feel less happy about their purchases (or falsely reassured, for that matter).  I'm only interested in what's true.</p>
Hi,
anti-caking agents do you no harm.
You don't want iodine? Why? If you don't have any then you'll be in a lot of trouble.
fluoride is fine too. If you don't like it then you'll be shocked to learn that nearly all toothpastes contain fluoride (good for the teeth, you see)
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#43 of 48 Old 02-17-2017, 08:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tinuviel_k View Post
Actually, the Himalayas do extend into Pakistan. There are six countries in which the Himalayan mountains run, and Pakistan is one of them. For instance, K2 (the second highest mountain on Earth and in the Himalayan range) is on the border between Pakistan and China.

Geography of the mountain range aside, I don't think the salt comes from the actual mountains. I was in a really cool salt shop and their literature said it came from near the Himalayas but not in them ( I think maybe 200 miles away, or something close to that?). I'm sure the name "Best Himalayan Salt Lamp Review & Benefits of himalayan salt lamp" was coined because it sounds much more exotic, and is more marketable, than "Pakistani Salt."
I think of it as being like when i went to BC Canada and all the tourist spots had "Canadian Maple Syrup" for sale in expensive little bottles. Sure, it was from Canada, but from clear across the country.

And yep, it is definitely mined, but then all non-sea salt needs to be. This particular "sea" salt is from really ancient sea beds: about 600 million years old. The salt is supposed to be very, very pure as far as salt deposits go (97% sodium chloride as opposed to a more common 94% in mined salt), but I don't know the actual mineral makeup. As for pollution and other chemical contaminates: I think it is pretty logical that the deposits, despite not being in the Himalayas, have been well protected deep within the Earth for millions of years and are probably as un-polluted as it gets.

The mine is supposed to be the second largest salt mine in the world. It is the Khewra salt mine, and there is lots of info on it if you do a web search. It's been a source of salt for people since before 300 BC, and actual mining started in the 1200's AD (I think There is a lot of interesting history surrounding it. Apparently it is a huge tourist attraction, and thousands of people visit it every year. There is a beautiful mosque inside made out of salt blocks: it is really lovely.

As for the actual mineral content and the fluoride concerns... i don't know, honestly. Some sources out there say it is really high in fluoride, and other sources say otherwise. Probably the only way to be sure would be to find someone independent, who doesn't have anything to gain or lose by the results, and get a good analysis done. Since many of the sites who are providing the analysis are either selling the salt or are vehemently against it it is hard to know who is telling the truth.

And as to whether it is this amazing miracle salt that all the hype would lead us to believe... I think probably not. It seems to me that the health industry loves to promote cool products, and neat things like this really take off on the health retail market and become a big fad. Some of the claims they make about the salt do seem a little "scammish."
The salt itself is beautiful, the lamps are gorgeous, the salt serving platters are a cool idea, the salt cooking platforms are awesome, and I'm sure it tastes lovely. But at the end of the day I don't think of it as one of those "must have" health items. There are lots of really great sources of salt out there, and this is but one of them.
[email protected] I agree with you.
Actually, I can tell you from my personal experience that it really works. It make my house so appealing too. Moreover I have feeling that I am getting health benefit from himalayan salt lamp!

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#44 of 48 Old 08-07-2017, 09:39 AM
 
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Here is some more info. Hope you enjoy https://goo.gl/FGGFua
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#45 of 48 Old 08-28-2017, 11:25 PM
 
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No, Himalayan Salt lamps are definitely not a scam. Tons of research have proven how beneficial they can be in removing harmful ions from to air to help those with allergies and even asthma breathe better.
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#46 of 48 Old 08-29-2017, 12:36 AM
 
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No, Himalayan Salt lamps are definitely not a scam. Tons of research have proven how beneficial they can be in removing harmful ions from to air to help those with allergies and even asthma breathe better.


The article you linked does not contain any research or links to research articles which support the claims made by advocates of salt lamps.


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#47 of 48 Old 10-15-2020, 11:30 PM
 
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when its about it being salt, No Himalayan rock salts is a real salt some claims Himalayan rock salts does taste better but for me they taste the same there are some medical claims about himalayan salt but alsonot sure because its still not proven but what is Himalayan salt lamp it legit can use to deodorize room ,i have 5 cats and 1 dog and sometimes it can get my condo so stinky but himalayan salt Lamp is effective removing smells
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#48 of 48 Old 11-05-2020, 07:52 PM
 
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Pink Himalayan salt is chemically similar to table salt. It contains up to 98 percent sodium chloride. The rest of the salt consists of trace minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium. These give the salt its light pink tint. These minerals also explain why Himalayan salt tastes different from regular table salt.
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