Is Disney bad for your kids? - Mothering Forums
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By moominmamma
  • 1 Post By kathymuggle
  • 1 Post By jrobertson1984
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 9 Old 12-29-2016, 03:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is Disney bad for your kids?

I read this article today, cant share the link cause new to the site, but it's on parentingpod.com and it's talking about all the disney princesses and why they are bad role models!! Anyone see it and can post link?

found it so funny but also a bit worrying! I think about the bad guys, but not usually the good ones!

Do you ever discuss this stuff with your kids before/while they watch? Or do any of you ban it altogether cause of it?
Elizabeth Richmond is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 9 Old 12-29-2016, 09:35 PM
 
philomom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 9,674
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
We pick and choose the Disney we let into our home.

Winners..

Beauty and the Beast Belle loves books, Belle does good
Mulan Mulan is protecting her father
Treasure Planet Jim grows up
Tarzan this Jane is do-able
Robin Hood Likable but with more typical gender roles
Atlantis hero is a skinny scholar, the princess is a rebel
philomom is offline  
#3 of 9 Old 12-29-2016, 11:44 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 7,681
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
We have avoided almost everything Disney in our house, partly because the helpless-female role model stuff and partly because of the distorted body image stuff, but more than anything because it's such a huge marketing machine for licensed trash and spin-offs. For many kids it's the first major hook into branded content and merchandising. We have simple-living hippie tendencies; we really wanted to avoid exposing our young children to the world of consumerism until they were old enough to have the mature critical thinking skills required to see how marketers try to play their consumer base for profit.

Ironically enough although my kids (youngest now 13, oldest now 22) grew up almost entirely Disney-free and very savvy about the marketing, they have two cousins who are professional Disney princesses. As in, they work on Disney cruise ships as in-character performers. One spent several years as Cinderella and is now Elsa, another plays Belle. And their mom, my sister-in-law, describes her daughters as "living every little girl's dream." I never quite know what to say so I just smile and say nothing. We live far apart, so we only see them every couple of years. Family ... gotta love 'em.

Miranda
blessedwithboys likes this.

Mountain mama to one great kid and three great grown-ups
moominmamma is offline  
 
#4 of 9 Old 01-06-2017, 07:34 PM
 
kathymuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,807
Mentioned: 251 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2601 Post(s)
Meh. I would probably let them watch any Disney movie they wanted to. There is something to be said for letting kids have similar cultural experiences as their peers, and not attaching to much importance to something by banning it. I did (and still do on occasion, lol) talk about the inappropriate messages of some of the Disney nonsense, but not during the film. I don't want to ruin it for them, I just used it if I could (subtly) as a teaching moment.
SchoolmarmDE likes this.

There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.
 
Book and herb loving mama to 2 teens and one young adult.
kathymuggle is offline  
#5 of 9 Old 01-06-2017, 07:42 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 7,681
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
Not sure if you assumed I was banning it, but I didn't. My kids weren't exposed by peers, and I didn't make a point of purposely exposing them. Where I live you have more in common with your peers if you snowboard, sing in choir or have helped deliver a lamb than if you've watched Finding Dory.

Miranda

Mountain mama to one great kid and three great grown-ups
moominmamma is offline  
#6 of 9 Old 01-06-2017, 09:10 PM
 
kathymuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,807
Mentioned: 251 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2601 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
Not sure if you assumed I was banning it, but I didn't. My kids weren't exposed by peers, and I didn't make a point of purposely exposing them. Where I live you have more in common with your peers if you snowboard, sing in choir or have helped deliver a lamb than if you've watched Finding Dory.

Miranda
I wasn't. I posted after you, but I did not quote you. The OP brought up banning, fwiw.

I was making the point that sometimes kids clamour for what they can't have, and that refusing things often makes them more attractive. My eldest wanted to read The Giver at one point (he was about 10 or 11) and I felt it was too old for him. I actually put it away and he searched for it, found it and read it without my knowledge.

I would not deliberately introduce kids to Disney (umm..well I might...we have enjoyed going to the movies as a family) but I would not refuse to let my kids watch it if they requested it. I understand not all kids are exposed to Disney by peers (shrug). I also live in a farm area - I know plenty of kids who have helped deliver animals - but they still have watched Finding Dory. Nonetheless, I believe you if you say it is uncommon for kids to be exposed to Disney early in your area. I also suspect your area is not typical. Disney is ubiquitous in most places.

There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.
 
Book and herb loving mama to 2 teens and one young adult.

Last edited by kathymuggle; 01-06-2017 at 10:13 PM.
kathymuggle is offline  
#7 of 9 Old 01-07-2017, 12:55 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
It's a matter of how you communicate about the situation in the movies with your children. Keeping it from them won't help them.
Chirina is offline  
#8 of 9 Old 02-15-2017, 12:14 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Absolutely not. Talking with them through situations and guiding how they interpret them is key
Kristina White 2 is offline  
#9 of 9 Old 11-18-2020, 06:26 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I read many reviews about it and one study showed that watching Disney characters help one another, inspired children to help their own friends. Another study by Coyne revealed that Disney films are rich in so-called “prosocial” behavior, such as sharing, helping others, or offering compliments or encouragement. My children watch it all the time and they didn't become aggressive or closed in themselves. Moreover, I give them a disney quiz and they like to make it. They are social and they help me around the house ( to clean, to prepare food, and many others).
applejuice likes this.
jrobertson1984 is offline  
Reply


User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Online Users: 1,085

10 members and 1,075 guests
barnetta , bimaster , idler , K703 , lauritagoddess , lermontq , lmaraial57 , omarinbox1888 , RhiannonRain , satkins
Most users ever online was 21,860, 06-22-2018 at 09:45 PM.