Reducing Food Budget w/ Food Restrictions - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 03:33 PM
 
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mamafish, I've always seen a higher loss % quoted even for hanging weight, and that's only been for cows (higher than 10-20% I mean, not higher than 60%). I'm assuming, based on zero knowledge that sheep have a lower yield.
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#32 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 04:38 PM
 
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Yeah, the "average" loss for beef I've seen listed on sites is 30%. That's a grade 3 carcass. Grade 1 carcasses yield about 80% of hanging weight, from what I've read. I, too, wonder if there's not a higher loss for lambs.

eta: Now, remember that the price CS was quoted was for a LIVE lamb. Even a steer, after slaughter, goes from 1000lbs to about 600lbs. So that's a 40% loss of weight right there.
You want to try to find someplace that sells by hanging weight, not live, for the best deal (generally speaking).

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#33 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 05:48 PM
 
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The first one says live weight... the 2nd says hanging weight (do I assume that's dead?) Oh- and the first one that says you get 40% yeild IS from live weight. So I wonder what kind of yield you get from hanging weight? hmmm. Is the difference just that the blood has been drained? So with a small lamb, it probably wouldn't make a huge difference, right?

But either way, if you're paying per pound of the whole animal (live or hanging), I would imagine you could get any parts you want, right? So yeah Tanya, in essence the bones and stuff would be free.

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#34 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 06:10 PM
 
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Ok, I think this is starting to make sense to me. Live weight is, well... the whole animal. Hanging weight is with skin, blood & innards removed (and head??)?

Guy #2 emailed me back and said I could have whatever innards I wanted (for no extra charge) as long as I come up on slaughter day. And I make arrangements with the butcher for the bones.

So I'm looking at $3/lb hanging weight, that should be a pretty good deal, right? Because if I'm getting all bone-in cuts + all the extra bones, I'm going to be getting most of that weight, right?

Sorry to totally take over this thread. But man, if I could find a cheaper source of lamb that would save us SO much money!!! If this works out, I'll probably have to buy multiple lambs at a time and get a freezer, because it sounds like most places sell out pretty quick and then are done until the next summer. I'm looking into this at exactly the right time!!

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#35 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 06:10 PM
 
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Look up hanging weight yield for sheep, I think for cows I've seen it quoted at around 60%?
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#36 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 06:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tanyalynn View Post
Look up hanging weight yield for sheep, I think for cows I've seen it quoted at around 60%?
So you end up getting only 60% of the hanging weight? Why so little? What are they taking out that would equal that 40%? I'm googling right now for lamb, but not finding a whole lot.

eta: I found this on one website, but it doesn't tell you how much less the final yield is.

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What is hanging weight, and why am I charged for that weight instead of the final net weight?

The hanging weight is the weight of the lamb at the point that it is ready to be cut to your specifications. The hanging weight includes all of the potentially usable meat and associated bones. This weight is obtained with the meat cutter' scale, and it is the weight that is used to calculate charges for cutting and wrapping. Using this weight is the fairest and most consistent method for calculating price. Please note however that the final yield is less than the hanging weight. The actual yield is influenced by the size of the individual lamb and how many cuts involving removal of bone are requested by the customer.



eta: Ooh- found another one. This is much more helpful:
Quote:
The average 110 lb. lamb will be 50 lbs. hanging weight. After bones and fat are removed, you ’ll take home between 35 and 45 lbs. of meat.

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#37 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 06:46 PM
 
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But CS, your situation is exactly the point of this thread in this forum. You can't switch to more grains, for example, your choices are very, very limited. It may be more extreme than most of us here, but this type of problem-solving is exactly the issue. And it makes me feel like a wimp, so I'll go back to cleaning my kitchen and then cooking my dinner (even on a day when I'd rather do take-out--I'm grateful it's an option for us).
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#38 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 06:49 PM
 
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I think you found all the info you need, but I'd say that the losses for a cow are fat (which clearly you'd want) and bones, which again you want, and probably some connective tissue between things that you may not want and that would probably just get thrown away.

I'd still assume you won't get 100% of your hanging weight, even muscle meat + organs + bones, but at least 80%? Does that seem reasonable to anyone else? And if you are there on slaughter day and can snag some extra bones or organs or fat, then you could come out really, really good.
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#39 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 07:16 PM
 
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I'd still assume you won't get 100% of your hanging weight, even muscle meat + organs + bones, but at least 80%? Does that seem reasonable to anyone else? And if you are there on slaughter day and can snag some extra bones or organs or fat, then you could come out really, really good.
Yeah, I think that sounds right. Which means that $3/lb for hanging weight should end up being an excellent deal. I think I better email this guy back and tell him I want a lamb!! He's only got a few left for the year.

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#40 of 44 Old 09-13-2010, 07:17 PM
 
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I think most people say you get about 30lbs of meat from a 60lb lamb, and then you could get all the bones, fat, organs in addition (hanging weight wouldn't include organs). So it would be a matter of following up with the slaughter folks & butcher so you are in the right place at the right time to get all those things (I bet you could get extra fat, bones, and organs too, especially if you explain that you want them for your cute toddler who can only eat 4 foods and lamb is one of them - our butcher was more than happy to give us everything from that day's cutting, most people don't want extra fat & bones). So at the end of the day, it would probably be a significantly better deal than what you're getting now.

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#41 of 44 Old 09-15-2010, 02:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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There are three of us- my husband, my 7 month old son and myself. My husband has just started a specialized diet to combat his rheumatoid arthritis. His regimen is no dairy, no wheat, no soy, no citrus, no corn, no meat, no tomatoes, no potatoes, no eggplant, no sugar, no chocolate, no eggs, no peppers, no oils except flax oil, no beans except lentils, and no nuts except maybe some pumpkin seeds. We eat a lot of veggies and rice! Squash is a staple. I've learned to spice it up differently though. I found Indian food recipes on the internet and have been using those. Indian food is great for different ways to fix lentils, chickpeas and rice. We eat three green smoothies a day. We've really embraced the fruits and veggies. Yesterday, we went to the farmer's markets and a local health food store and spent about $100 total, much of which was stocking up on rice and lentils and peaches which will last us a while. We got a big box of peaches, some melons, carrots, and leafy greens. We've found farmer's markets to be a great place for finding produce that hasn't been sprayed. We got nuts and raisins for non-sugary trail mix for me. A CSA has helped some too. We don't buy flax oil, we just get flax seeds and blend them up in our smoothies.

We're really tight right now because my husband's rheumatoid arthritis prevents him from keeping up a regular job, so we are going into business for ourselves, but because of flare ups that's taking a while too. We will probably be able to bring our numbers down some more with trimming. Not eating dairy and meat has helped cut down our grocery bills a lot. We do buy meat for our dogs because it's better for them. My husband looks for 99 cents a pound meat and stocks up when he finds it. We calculated that buying meat for two American Eskimos at 99 cents a pound costs as much as a the dry dog food we were buying before, and saves us money because we don't have to keep on buying bones for the dogs.
Have you used chickpea flour yet? I get mine at an Indian market. And I make zucchini fritters with them. Not many ingredients. Is your DH no wheat or no gluten? I think that gluten in general is inflammatory so just doing no wheat might not be enough. I told a friend of mine with RA about a non-inflammatory diet but I don't think he really believed that it would work.

My dog is on a raw diet as well. She's small, but I get her thighs and legs (with some organ meat in there from grass fed animals) that are 79 cents/lb. And the vet said how healthy she was and asked if I brushed her teeth every day. Hah!

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Originally Posted by mamafish9 View Post
Hey Kathy!!! This from a post on a blog Lisa linked to on FB today:

"A friend has started a microbusiness supplying meals to others in the area with gourmet dinners. Each week this chef-gone-mama sends out an email detailing what that week's two options are. You can have one or both."

http://simple-green-frugal-co-op.blo...ut-dinner.html

You sooooo could do that!!! GFDF, whatever allergens you need free.... You could cook for your family and just make more volume .
well now that all the kids are in school, I've got the time!!

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How about some ideas for cooking the cheaper cuts of meat? Like fun chicken wing recipes, or things to do with turkey wings and backs? Those turkey cuts have quite a bit of meat on them for things like soup or turkey salad, and you get to make broth from the bones.

Crockpots and/or Dutch ovens are great for tenderizing the bony stuff. Speaking of which... Lamb neck stew for dinner tonight, methinks. Don't tell dh!
Chicken thighs are 79 cents/lb here (conventional) and with the Cornell barbecue recipe (vinegar, egg - which isn't really necessary I don't think), and one other ingredient I can't remember.... salt), they taste finger-licking good.

I've been getting turkey legs, which are pretty cheap, to make into bone broth so that I don't have to get a whole turkey and roast it (they're not around except during the holidays at stores around here). Of course, there's turkeys roaming our neighborhood... and they're pretty slow... maybe I can catch one.

These are great ideas, guys! I actually have some cube steak from the grass-fed place that I'm looking for an idea for. I found a new recipe for some old bone-in chicken breasts that I got for $1.49/lb a while ago that I'm trying today.

So far I've stayed on budget (one week, so doesn't tell me much). Of course next weekend we're going camping so we'll see if I can stay on it. This would actually free up a lot of our budget if I could keep to it. With both kids and I doing the lyme/osteo treatment, and my other stuff this summer, my health costs have skyrocketed.

Kathy, mother of 3, wife of 1. My new recipe blog:
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#42 of 44 Old 09-15-2010, 04:04 PM
 
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Here, thighs and drumsticks are .99$ on sale, and breasts are 1.99 on sale. I try really hard to only buy meats/poultry when on sale and if I can, stock up.

I'm brining some chook cuts right now.

Kathy, what's the bbq sauce recipe? I'll try it without the eggs...

Also, have you ever heard of Elliot Coleman? He's in Maine and has a much loved book called Four Season Harvest that you may like. (Gardening yr round) There are tons of greens that love cold weather and that would really be helpful since greens can be pricey and are so nutrient dense and helpful in chronic situations. My favorite is swiss chard. Easy to grow, mild in flavor. Yum!

For breakfast, we've been doing cereal grains--millet, rice, sweet grits, and quinoa. Soak over night, cook in the am (or even better, cook in the evening and it's all ready to go!)--eat with milk of choice, honey, cinnamon and raisins or frozen blueberries.

Lunch is either rice and beans or chili-type beans or tacos (bean, or chicken usually).

I love winter becuase meals are so easy--soups, stews, roasted winter veggies, hot cereals, etc. Cheaper too!

Babies hungry, gotta go!

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typos likely

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#43 of 44 Old 09-16-2010, 05:44 PM
 
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SO I can't do this yet, but I'm making an amazon wish list--things that come cheaper in a twelve pack like pasta (and cheaper than I can get it here for), egg replacer, agave nectar, ect...

AND I'm figuring what it would take to do the subscribe and save prgram to save even more...

SO, what do you order online--where aer the best prices?

AND, what do you use the subscribe and save to get? Thanks!

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#44 of 44 Old 09-16-2010, 06:30 PM
 
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Love subscribe & save - I get annies mac&cheese, maple syrup, crackers, larabars, horizon vanilla milks (for DD's lunch), hmmm, there's more, but I can't remember what at the moment. We very rarely visit the grocery store any more - between local farmers for dairy, eggs, produce, meat, local bakery for breads, and subscribe & save, there aren't many things we need the store for.

Pick battles big enough to matter, small enough to win. ~Jonathan Kozel
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