Is sprouted flour better than soaked after being ground flour? - Mothering Forums
 
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#1 of 10 Old 04-16-2009, 05:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Or are they pretty much equal? *scratching her*

Also, does sprouted flour bake differently than other flour? Does it taste different? What does everyone prefer, soaked grains or sprouted grains?

I honestly didn't know you could but sprouted flour, just learned this from cheeseslave's blog, she said she buys it here: http://www.sproutedgrainbread.com/index.html

It seems like for the average person at home, soaking grains/flour would theoretically be cheaper, since I can buy fresh ground flour for $1 lb at Great Harvest, for example... if I could just get a recipe for bread etc that is reliable and my kids would eat. But other stuff lends itself so easily to soaking, like pancakes & oatmeal.

Thinking about taste in addition to nutrition- I'm wondering whether it would be worth it to buy sprouted grain to make my own bread, or if my girls would even eat it. Right now my oldest prefers Nature's Own 100% Whole Wheat, so something that is reminiscent of that would be wonderful. I am curious about the texture/flavor of sprouted vs soaked compared to store-bought whole wheat bread, what would be most similar or tastiest.

An extrovert, married to my introverted dh since '01, mothering my girls C (2003) and G (2006).

 

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#2 of 10 Old 04-16-2009, 06:32 PM
 
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I use Sue Gregg's blender batter method to make whole grain, soaked baking products, such as pancakes, etc. I just buy whatever whole grains I want to use, we avoid wheat, and use the blender. I use the same process to make pizza dough, doughnuts, pretzels, muffins, banana bread, pasta, etc. She has several cookbooks available with the 'how to'. But, about everything is free on her website, if you read through it. http://www.suegregg.com/recipes/brea...erwafflesA.htm

I do find that homemade pasta is easier with sprouted flour than with the blender batter, since there is so much liquid. And I haven't been successful with making sandwich bread, only dinner rolls with the blender batter. I don't have an exact recipe, I just do the 1:1 grain to liquid ratio and add extra sprouted or freshly ground flour to make the dough the right texture. I grind grains in my blender dry, but they do heat up a bit. So, I believe the (expensive) sprouted flour is probably easiest and most nutritious, maybe. However, flour loses about 75% of the nutrients within the first 24 hours it is ground, iirc.

Here are a bunch of her recipes: http://www.suegregg.com/teaching/Who...ingLessons.htm


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#3 of 10 Old 04-16-2009, 06:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I tried her blender recipe with my old blender... it was a crappy blender didn't work so well. If I actually owned a blender, or mixer of any sort, that would probably be helpful with her recipes.

I have a bread machine (Breadman) and my own two sturdy arms. That's it. I tried the soaked bread recipe at Urban Homemaker but couldn't get the settings right since I don't have a Zourishi or whatever they recommend, it didn't turn out well.

One reason I am personally thinking of going grain-free is because it is so hard for me to do basic breads. I've been soaking oatmeal a few years now and like the NT pancakes, but haven't mastered the bread or cracker thing yet.

An extrovert, married to my introverted dh since '01, mothering my girls C (2003) and G (2006).

 

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#4 of 10 Old 04-16-2009, 07:08 PM
 
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I only use sprouted grain flours and will often sour or soak the flour prior to use. It works BEAUTIFULLY and can be used on a 1:1 ratio for regular flour. I've made cookies, breads, puff pastry, pie crust,short bread and all other sorts of goodies.

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#5 of 10 Old 04-23-2009, 04:19 PM
 
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I do both the sprouted wheat/buckwheat and soaking methods pretty extensively. I have a *really* hard time making bread for some reason though. I just use an old coffee grinder I picked up at a yard sale for $2 to grind the grains. When I make the sprouted grains (wheat) I tend to toast the grains *very* lightly in the oven to make sure they are dry, so the final baked good has a lightly toasted flavor right at the start which I like. I typically use this flour for when I don't have time to soak. I do soaked stuff though. The more sour the better. I'll use yogurt or raw milk mostly b/c buttermilk is hard to find in the uk and some of it is not w/ live bacteria so it won't age/sour as well.
HTH.
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#6 of 10 Old 04-23-2009, 06:03 PM
 
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so how would I go about making a soaked flour batter for pancakes?
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#7 of 10 Old 04-25-2009, 10:32 AM
 
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I start with 2 cups flour and 2 cups soaking liquid (usually 1/4c kefir + 1 3/4c milk). I especially like the whole wheat pastry flour for this, but spelt is yummy too. You also could use whey or yogurt with milk or water too. Let this soak overnight. In the AM add 2 eggs, tsp baking soda, salt, and melted butter (I use 1/4c). Then adjust consistency with more water or some white flour if you want it thicker. They take a little longet to cook, so turn the heat down or they will burn before the middle is done. I use an electric griddle set to 300.

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#8 of 10 Old 04-25-2009, 10:42 AM
 
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And I should add that we like it a bit tangy around here, but if that is too sour for you, use just a couple TBs of the acidic medium. :

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#9 of 10 Old 05-02-2009, 01:12 PM
 
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soaked grains or commercially known as sprouted mash are not the same as dry sprouted flour you can buy. Mash products you can buy in the store are always frozen so they don't grow bacteria...not healthy. Making your own sprouted flour is difficult, such as toasting the grains as mentioned below can kill the grain and reduce if not eliminate the benefits of the sprout. Also mentioned below about grains losing 75% of their nutrients after 24 hours may be true to regular grain but when you eat sprouted flour (done properly) it still will digest as a vegetable, same as if you dried and ground broccoli. Properly sprouted and DRIED grains contain Pre and Pro biotic properties but can easily lose these properties if the process isn't perfect.

Anyway, point being, there is a reason sprouted flour is so expensive on the shelf, it is a very difficult and extensive process. There have been some very large companies trying to commercially make sprouted flour for years and some spending as much as $20 million doing so with no luck.
Listening to discussions amongst the Whole Grains Counsil there is one company hitting the sprouted grain commercially...and doing it well. Essential Eating has been mastering the process and it is growing out on the east coast being used in commercial brand products. One company mentioned at the counsil meeting was Unique Pretzels and a new product to their line using 100% whole grain sprouted flour. Unheard of to use 100% whole grain and it tastes good. They also do not add a ton of ingredients... 6 to be exact, including water.
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#10 of 10 Old 05-02-2009, 06:50 PM
 
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i found good sprouted flour here
http://www.localharvest.org/sprouted...-50-lbs-C10517

i often use half sprouted ww flour for a recipe and half white flour so that the end product tastes somewhat "normal" to my family.
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