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#31 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 04:06 PM
 
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Mama, I know "trust your gut" is kind of a popular mantra, but in many cases it really is bad advice. Our gut instincts are not experts in everything. Sometimes they tell us what we want to hear. When my son was literally starving on a breastmilk supply that I didn't know was dropping, my gut told me everything was ok and my pediatrician was overreacting -- my baby was nursing after all, wasn't he? He should have been fine, right? My instincts only knew what my brain did, and my brain didn't know what was happening.

Point being: breathing problems are life and death serious. If your child is having problems breathing and your instincts tell you things might be ok ... please, for the sake of your baby, don't trust them. The risks of oxygen deprivation aren't something to guess about.
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#32 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 05:07 PM
 
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Mama, I know "trust your gut" is kind of a popular mantra, but in many cases it really is bad advice. Our gut instincts are not experts in everything. Sometimes they tell us what we want to hear. When my son was literally starving on a breastmilk supply that I didn't know was dropping, my gut told me everything was ok and my pediatrician was overreacting -- my baby was nursing after all, wasn't he? He should have been fine, right? My instincts only knew what my brain did, and my brain didn't know what was happening.

Point being: breathing problems are life and death serious. If your child is having problems breathing and your instincts tell you things might be ok ... please, for the sake of your baby, don't trust them. The risks of oxygen deprivation aren't something to guess about.
I have to agree, only because as previously stated, I've been in the situation twice where I thought my girls weren't *that* bad and come to find out they were hardly getting any oxygen, which as stated is very, very dangerous. Dd2 actually had to transfer to the ER in an ambulance from the ped's office. I had taken her to the ER the night before, and at that point her oxygen level was low but not alarmingly so, and they told me to go home and take her to the ped the next day. Thank goodness I didn't skip that appointment since she seemed to me to be improving.

Hugs to you. I'm sure it must feel like everyone is coming down really hard, but I think a lot of us have been there and realize the danger in the situation as a result.

~Beth, mama to two amazing girls, ages 12 and 6~

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#33 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 05:11 PM
 
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ITA with the pps. You took a huge, huge risk last night with your child's health. It could have had long-term, serious impacts to him. I am so glad he's okay this morning, but please never, ever refuse to get him help in a situation like that again.
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#34 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 05:49 PM
 
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Update.

We did not go to the ER. I understand your concerns about sleeping from exhaustion, but in my experience there is a qualitative difference between restful healthy sleep and exhausted weak sleep. He was sleeping restfully. He woke up after three hours to ask me to take him to the potty. Still wheezing and retracting, but definitely not near the level the doctor heard when she said to take him in. At six we called the doctor again, who said to bring him in to her office. He was clearly not *well* as he laid his head down frequently, had effortful breathing, and would lose his breath halfway through any long sentence, but he was not *sick* either. I firmly believe in a mother's (or other caregiver's) intuitive sense.

In fact, when we got to the doctor's office, his ox-sat was at 95%. After ten minutes on a nebulizer, he was back to his normal wonderful happy self (when I asked him if his head hurt he said: "No! Not anymore!"). She tested for flu and strep and both came back negative, and he has no fever, so the options are:

1) bad virus
2) bad allergies
3) early asthma, probably allergy related

He's on Singulair and Albuterol (both orally) for two weeks and then I guess it's wait and see.

He tested negative for allergies some months past, but the doctor and I agreed that he clearly presented an allergic profile so we will probably schedule a follow-up session.

Thank you all for your assistance.
Did you say you gave him a dose of ibuprofen and sometime after that he started presenting with breathing problems? If that's so, then he might be allergic/sensitive to one of the ingredients in the ibuprofen.

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#35 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 06:45 PM
 
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I would not ever stay home with a child who could not stop wheezing. There is the immediate danger of low O2, and the long-term danger of increasing damage to the lungs. Mama instinct can be a great thing...but sometimes it leads us wrong, and sometimes we only listen to the part of our instincts that we want to hear.

I'm glad your little guy is all right. Hopefully they identify his triggers.
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#36 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 06:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I understand the position of the many mamas who are posting that I should have taken him to the ER ASAP.

I suppose it would have helped to say that the pediatrician most certainly did NOT say "Rush him to the ER as soon as you can." Rather, she said something along the lines of "He does sound like he's having trouble breathing, so it would probably be a good idea to take him in." She listened to him several times over the course of a five-six minute conversation, and vacillated about whether we should go in several times, only making up her mind after she heard him for a minute straight and he was wheezing badly.

The fact that the wheezing dropped in intensity right after that call was a huge factor in deciding to stay home.

FWIW, when I explained to my doctor what I did, she was completely supportive. I asked her whether I should have called her back when he seemed to be getting better and she said no, that wasn't necessary.

I'm not sure why, if it really can be as hard as you say to tell how oxegenated a child is, and if a wheezing child can really go so quickly from heaving-but-okay to oxygen-deprived, she wasn't more assertive about telling me to go in.

Obviously, if my doctor had said "This is a problem, you need to bring your child to the hospital now" I would have done so. The doctor said "This wheezing doesn't sound good, you should probably bring him in" and then the wheezing got better. That seems to me like a different case.


Are you all saying that any time a child starts to wheeze with retracting he has to go to the ER? Because that was not the message I got from my pediatrician. We have an appointment in two weeks for a follow-up and I will definitely ask her for clearer guidance. If we have another incident before then, I'll probably err on the side of caution, just because of the consistency of all of your responses. (Which is to say, while I probably come across as defensive and contrary, I definitely understand that your posts are only as harsh as you think you need to be to make me understand the severity of what I am dealing with and because your opinions are all so consistent I will *act* in accordance with what you all are saying despite still feeling like the exercise of judgment is not wrong.)
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#37 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 06:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Did you say you gave him a dose of ibuprofen and sometime after that he started presenting with breathing problems? If that's so, then he might be allergic/sensitive to one of the ingredients in the ibuprofen.

No, he was wheezing a little beforehand, and it was many hours (five I believe -- from 9 pm until 1-2 am) between when I gave him the ibuprofen and when he started having real trouble.
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#38 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 07:10 PM
 
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I nearly died from "waiting" for a breathing problem to get better. My grandmother DIED because she wanted to "wait it out."

My son has had pneumonia, RSV. My daughter pneumonia twice. Both children unfortunately needed intervention for all of these illnesses.

Breathing problems, of any sort, but especially pediatric, can go from marginal to dead in a matter or minutes or seconds in some cases. You know, the whole debate, oh the $150 copay ......

I think in the future that you should better evaluate the situation.

Retracting is a definitive sign that a child needs to be evaluated IN PERSON by trained personnel not over the phone. My father routinely has the head respiratory therapist position, and he and I have had this conversation repeatedly. For future reference, wheezing + retracting is really bad.

Your pedi had already told you to go in. You hadn't gone. You were considering going such that you called her, perhaps, such that you called her a second time. So, if you didn't listen the first time why would you listen the second?

I am glad that your child is okay. But I just cannot, cannot condone such behavior on the part of a parent.

Liz

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#39 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 07:13 PM
 
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I would say, since you asked, that yes, any time a child is wheezing and retracting you should go to your pediatrician or the ER if it is the middle of the night. As a peds nurse those two things are a bad combination. Kids have a knack for looking/acting healthier than they are, and I would say he probably fell asleep because he was so exhausted from trying to breathe. I'm glad everything turned out alright for you and your ds. I would definitely tell your pediatrician that in the future you need firmer guidance, that's a perfectly reasonable request. Also, I respect you keeping your cool despite a lot of mamas (well meaning though I'm sure they were) being quite "firm" in their responses to you.

On a somewhat unrelated note: don't give your ds "half doses" of ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Half of a dose does NOTHING. It doesn't do "half as good". Either give the appropriate dose for his weight or skip it all together if you're nervous about giving medication (which is entirely your decision when we're talking about ibuprofen for a headache). Just some unsolicited advice because that's a common misunderstanding among parents.

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#40 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 07:13 PM
 
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As an ICU nurse - I would bring my LO in any time I saw them retracting while breathing, most especially while sleeping. And quite frankly, in an otherwise healthy child, sats of 95% are okay - but not great.

It really is hard sometimes to make the right call, especially in the middle of the night, you can back and forth in your mind. I've been there myself, convinced it's okay, then convinced it's not...

Perhaps it's because of the profession I'm in, and the number of kids I've seen resusitated, but I always err on the side of caution with regard to respiratory issues. It's a PITA to drag a sleeping kid out into the cold, but it's definitely worth the alternative.

I really am glad to hear he's doing better!

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#41 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 07:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dov'sMom View Post
FWIW, when I explained to my doctor what I did, she was completely supportive. I asked her whether I should have called her back when he seemed to be getting better and she said no, that wasn't necessary.

I'm not sure why, if it really can be as hard as you say to tell how oxegenated a child is, and if a wheezing child can really go so quickly from heaving-but-okay to oxygen-deprived, she wasn't more assertive about telling me to go in.
My POV is already obvious. But honestly? If I had hired for my children a pediatrician who understood the breathing problem to be as severe as you described here and still felt it to be no big deal that for whatever reason he did not receive a medical evaluation, I'd be looking for a new pediatrician. It just seems like there's either some miscommunication involved or that she's not as familiar with caring for children with breathing difficulties as it's possible you may need. I'm not saying she's a bad doctor -- just that if it happens again your child might be better served by seeing someone more specialized to the field, either by training or experience.
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#42 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 08:26 PM
 
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My DD has cough-variant asthma and is seen by a team of university pediatric pulmonologists. I have always been told to bring her in immediately if I see retractions. (Please note--I never have. My understanding is that retractions are very serious.)

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#43 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 08:30 PM
 
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So glad to hear he's doing better.

In re: to whether retraction + wheezing = automatic ER visit, I would say in general yes. I did have one situation with my DS1 where he had stridor + retraction (croup). I was on the phone with the pediatric nurse and she instructed me to try the bathroom steam trick for 20 minutes first. I have to say I was really uncomfortable waiting it out that long and I decided for future cases I would not, as we ended up in the ER anyway that night. But the next time it happened DS had stridor + retraction but as I was changing clothes to go he fell asleep and stopped both and I did not wake him up to take him in. Its a judgement call and we all hope to make the right one. Sometimes we get it wrong because we don't have the information to realize how serious a situation can be. I've been there - the 1st few times DD had stridor I didn't realize the seriousness. Thankfully I had those experiences so that when we found ourselves really in an emergency we knew better what we were dealing with. It sounds like this experience served that role for you.


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#44 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 08:38 PM
 
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Obviously, if my doctor had said "This is a problem, you need to bring your child to the hospital now" I would have done so. The doctor said "This wheezing doesn't sound good, you should probably bring him in" and then the wheezing got better. That seems to me like a different case.
Problem is your doctor or the nurse cannot diagnose the extent of this over the phone. I would still take the child in and not rely on an unseen diagnosis or evaluation of how severe it is. It could have gone severe quick.
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#45 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 08:42 PM
 
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Also, when you say he is on oral albuterol--do you mean a liquid? That's a rotten way to take albuterol. At 2.5 he could do an inhaler and spacer, or you could briefly rent a nebulizer. A ped RXing liquid albuterol for a 2.5yo is not up to date on current asthma guidelines.

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#46 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 09:15 PM
 
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heaving-but-okay to oxygen-deprived
If a child is heaving, especially while sleeping, they ARE oxygen deprived.

If your childs oxygen level were only at 95% when he was feeling "ok", imagine what they were when his poor little body was retracting, fighting for air, while he was sleeping. I'm assuming MUCH MUCH lower.

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#47 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 09:16 PM
 
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Are you all saying that any time a child starts to wheeze with retracting he has to go to the ER?
Yes.
If your Dr. does not think so, she should not be a Dr.

Retracting is very, very serious.

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#48 of 81 Old 05-05-2009, 09:39 PM
 
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Also, when you say he is on oral albuterol--do you mean a liquid? That's a rotten way to take albuterol. At 2.5 he could do an inhaler and spacer, or you could briefly rent a nebulizer. A ped RXing liquid albuterol for a 2.5yo is not up to date on current asthma guidelines.

When my ds was around 18 months old he was sick and i just *knew* it was worse then it seemed kwim? he was acting okay but my gut said take him in, we went the ped and it turned out he had pneumonia, asthma (from a viral infection), and a double ear infection poor guy.. his ped gave him a nebulizer treatment w/albuterol and we had to buy a nebulizer from her office that day.. she said she NEVER gives children oral albuterol as it can make their heart race and all kinds of other side effects.. I second the idea of maybe seeing a different ped?

My ds turned out to be having reactions to the albuterol, I didn't really notice that first time since he was so young and so sick but he had to use the neb once this winter and he got very hyper, paranoid/freaked out.. the dr switched his neb med and he did great with it!

I'm so glad your LO is okay but agree that breathing issues are not to be messed around with.. very, very scary!

~Jaclyn~ Mama to Lucas Wyatt born 5-3-06
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#49 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 01:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Again, thank you all for your POV.

Amycld, if it makes you feel any better, his sats were 95 BEFORE he got better. He didn't get better until the nebulizer treatment, which was just after they did the sats. Obviously, I understand the message that next time there's retracting/heaving bring him straight in -- I'm not arguing that point anymore.


On the oral albuterol v. nebulizer, please tell me more. She said she's giving the oral because a 2.5 year old isn't going to get enough from an inhaler, but she never suggested using a nebulizer at home. He did great with the nebulizer at the doctor's office -- he held it up to his face and sat patiently until it was done. And he clearly got enough because he went from heavy wheezing, heaving, and retracting to mild wheezing and running around in 10 minutes. Her opinion on the oral was that it can lead to hyperactivity, but give the nighttime dose when he's already nodding off so it doesn't interfere with his sleep. She didn't say anything about other side effects. Should I call back and ask about the nebulizer? (For today at least, DS thinks the albuterol is the coolest medicine ever and he asked for more every time we gave it to him -- I guess it tastes good! We didn't notice any side effects.)
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#50 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 01:51 AM
 
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I realize this situation has already been dealt with, but I wanted to pass along an FYI in case there's a next time.

I was reading this just now and mentioned it to my DH who is a family practitioner. He said when they're wheezing and retracting and get sleepy, the sleepiness can be a scary, dangerous sign that the body is 'running out of steam' so to speak and having trouble keeping up. He said he had a few cases like that in residency (the last time he did inpatient peds) that had him pretty scared.

I just mention this because I got the impression that you thought the deep sleep he was getting was a good sign, and it may not have been.

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#51 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 08:45 AM
 
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On the oral albuterol v. nebulizer, please tell me more. She said she's giving the oral because a 2.5 year old isn't going to get enough from an inhaler, but she never suggested using a nebulizer at home. He did great with the nebulizer at the doctor's office -- he held it up to his face and sat patiently until it was done. And he clearly got enough because he went from heavy wheezing, heaving, and retracting to mild wheezing and running around in 10 minutes. Her opinion on the oral was that it can lead to hyperactivity, but give the nighttime dose when he's already nodding off so it doesn't interfere with his sleep. She didn't say anything about other side effects. Should I call back and ask about the nebulizer? (For today at least, DS thinks the albuterol is the coolest medicine ever and he asked for more every time we gave it to him -- I guess it tastes good! We didn't notice any side effects.)
Yes, I would ask why she did not suggest the nebulizer?, my son was 17 months old when he first used a nebulizer and the my friend's 7 month old uses one.. they have the childs mask or you can just hold it near their face (thats what i do, it works great) i'd google "Oral albuterol side effects"

my ped told me just think of the difference Oral albuterol has to go though the blood stream vs inhaled that go directly to the lungs so it works faster/better with less side effects..

also if he is reacting to the albuterol there is another rx they can give you (can't think of the name, the ped should know)

good luck!

~Jaclyn~ Mama to Lucas Wyatt born 5-3-06
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#52 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 01:11 PM
 
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Actually current practice is to use an inhaler plus a spacer for almost every child past infancy, I think. DD was initially given an inhaler and spacer at 2.5. We later got a nebulizer because we thought it might work better, but the data are supposed to show that an inhaler and spacer work just as well.

If you're not seeing any side effects, then in this case maybe don't worry, but if he has symptoms again (and I'm sorry to say that he well might) I suggest asking about another method or possibly switching to seeing a pulmonologist. I don't want to freak you out, but to me it sounds like your son had a very serious asthma episode, and correct me if I'm wrong, but he wasn't really even sick at the time, right? That suggests that he may have a severe allergy to something. How is he doing now? Has he had more wheezing?

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#53 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 03:19 PM
 
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There are many natural alternatives to help *prevent* asthma flares. However, when one is wheezing, it means that their oxygen intake is impaired. The concern that these mamas are expressing, is that the child is compromised, but you need a qualified assessment of the degree of severity. Unfortunately, there are several indicators that a more informed health care provider could be beneficial proactively, as pills and albuterol are not addressing the underlying issue. I really agree with the last three posters regarding an alternative practioner.

Of course, we are not there, and I support mother's expertise above a doctor's short visit with children. Although, "sleeping" is not an indicator of effective oxygenation to the brain. Are asthma and allergy issues been ongoing for an extended period of time or repeatedly? Or what has changed recently? What about eczema and testing for allergies? Are there foods still present in his diet which are impairing his gut/immune system? The gut is 70-80% of the immune system. These are the specific concerns that the posters are reacting to.

Wheezing is an external manifestation of impaired airway integrity. This is the concern.

I would consult our professional homeopath for fever, wheeze, cough. However, when one is wheezing, it means that their oxygen intake is impaired. Wheezing IS dangerous. There isn't "ok" wheezing.

The issue is that wheezing is a symptom that your baby's immune system is impaired. Why? Medications suppress the symptoms. *I* would see a professional homeopath immediately, personally. There are many alternatives to improve the immune function. I imagine there is some underlying allergy issue, either environmental or dietary.

Basically, the medical treatments just masked the symptoms. Doesn't mean your baby is "better", imo.

Here is more information about eliminating environmental allergens: https://www.mothering.com/discussions...l#post13380214

I'd pursue a classical homeopathic remedy specifically for his individual constitution. The homeopath would take into consideration other issues and address them concurrently, as they are part of the picture: dietary issues, sleep, eczema, the runny eyes, throat clearing, behaviors, fears, aversions, cravings, etc. All come into play, birth issues, chronic illness, etc.

I always prefer whole food probiotics to improve gut microbial balance and thus immune function.
Not sure if/which probiotics you all are using. But, none of the bottled probiotics have the same ability to withstand the stomach acid and remain viable into the large intestine as non-dairy kefir, fermented vegetables. Those are quite easy, if you need more info.

I would eliminate dairy from his diet. Dairy is the most common source of dietary allergen and mucus production. Here is a list of hidden diary: http://www.kellymom.com/store/handou...dden-dairy.pdf

Have you been following the digestion, absorption, detox pathways discussions to gut healing and allergy resolution? Basically, if we digest the proteins, they don't leak and thus we have fewer toxins to detox. Proper stomach acid (HCl) and specific nutrients are required for detox. I recommend vitamins and minerals come from whole foods. You can read more about all of this here: https://www.mothering.com/discussions...e#post13406780

Corn seems to be an issue for many folks, especially GMO-corn, which is about 70% of the food supply now, unfortunately. I'd consider eliminating that. But, it is hard as it is everywhere also. http://www.cornallergens.com/list/co...ergen-list.php

Corn and wheat allergies are more commonly associated with wheezing, I believe.

I'm no expert about gluten removal, but I believe I heard 6-12 weeks to see significant improvements. Dairy is quicker to see improvements (1-3 weeks). Gluten is hard to avoid completely also. And apparently, it is more important to be 100% gluten-free, or reactions are worse with any slight exposure, I believe.

Here is an informative thread about wheezing and pulmonary risks in children: https://www.mothering.com/discussions...648&highlight=

More about wheezing as a manifestation of food/environmental allergies: https://www.mothering.com/discussions...light=wheezing
https://www.mothering.com/discussions...g#post12748820

Alternatives to masking the symptoms of wheezing: https://www.mothering.com/discussions...light=wheezing

Wheezing IS dangerous. There isn't "ok" wheezing.


HTH, Pat

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#54 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 03:56 PM
 
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The fact that the wheezing dropped in intensity right after that call was a huge factor in deciding to stay home.

\
Just FYI, the fact that you can't hear wheezing anymore doesn't mean that his problems are better. In fact, that can be an indication things are worse. This is coming from a nurse.

I don't take my kids to the dr for most things, but breathing difficulties is something you don't mess around with.
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#55 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 04:15 PM
 
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While I do agree that breathing problems are nothing to mess around with, I think many people are being too hard on this mama.

Once in her life, my oldest had severe breathing problems. We had a pulse ox at home and her blood sat was 63 for a period of time. VERY low. We went to the ER immediately. They looked at her, hooked her up to their own pulse ox and found her blood sat at 85. They did a chest x ray and it was clear. They sent us home. I argued and came close to yelling, but I knew that would get me nowhere, because then you are the crazy parent. So we went home.

I kept her on her pulse ox and watched her O2 all night and all the next day. It kept dipping into the 50s. I tried desperately to move her around and prop her up and get her breathing better, but it kept dropping. At the end of that day, we went back in to ER. It was hard to do that, because I knew we would have another fight on our hands. We walked in and I refused to speak to any emergency room doctors. I would only talk to someone from PICU. We sat there a long time before someone finally came down. The PICU doc said it was very clear she was struggling and we were sent upstairs. Another x ray, and lo and behold, she had pneumonia, along with severe anemia. (It can take up to three days for pneumonia to show up on an x ray) She was very very sick and in PICU for several days. She did get better that time, thank goodness.

So I understand if a doc is saying "well, maybe you should go in, but maybe not", it would be very difficult to decide to go by yourself. If they decide they won't treat your child, that's it and that's that. If I had known more about breathing issues when my dd was so sick, I would probably have insisted on the PICU doc the first time, but I didn't. I know a lot more now, because of that experience. I'm sure this mama also feels she knows more now.
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#56 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 06:28 PM
 
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Reading your posts Dov'smom made my stomach clench. My dd has RSV at 4 weeks old and now has asthma (she is 7). I've btdt. I couldn't stand to keep reading all the harsh responses you are getting for not taking your son in. I think it is just that I, and a lot of these other moms, have already had the fear of God put into us re these breathing issues and our own experiences, and you haven't yet. Hopefully this was a one time thing and you won't have to get as familiar with it as some of us are.


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Are you all saying that any time a child starts to wheeze with retracting he has to go to the ER?
I strongly believe that any time there is retracting, the child needs to go to the ER. Our pediatric pulmonologist was upset with me that I didn't call 911 when my dd was 3 and having retractions. Rather I put her in the car and drove the 4 miles to the ER. Along the way I noticed she was turning gray so turned on my flashers and ran a red light. I pulled up right in front of the door, got out, left my door open, my purse on the seat, my keys in the ignition, pulled the baby out of her car seat and ran into the ER yelling that my baby couldn't breathe. Not 10 minutes before I left home she was running around playing.

There was no way for you to know if this was the case w/your son, but if someone goes from wheezing to not wheezing it can mean that they have significantly worsened and are no longer moving air.

I think you have accepted these comments and advice with grace and maturity.

s
best wishes to you and your lo,
Tracy

Rockin' mama to Allison (9), Asher (5) and Alethea (3), head over heels in love with my sexy husband, Tony.

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#57 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 08:02 PM
 
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Glad to see a happy update

Just for future reference, and you might already know this: a 95% oxygen saturation is the lower end of "okay." It's not grading like a test. If your O2 sat. is 90% you're in deep respiratory trouble (failure). If you take a look at the Oxygen-Hemoglobin Saturation Curve you can see that just a small change in oxygen saturation results in a large change in PaO2 in the lungs. It doesn't take much!

Hopefully he can get a nebulizer and get feeling better fast!
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#58 of 81 Old 05-06-2009, 11:24 PM
 
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My DD had her first wheezing at 2. The ped used nebulizer in office but sent us home with liquid albuterol. I talked with my neighbor whose DS had years of problems. She offered her nebulizer and we switched to Xopenex. The treatment is much more effective and with less alertness. Nothing is worse than having a child wired on meds when all need sleep. She is now 3.5 with much less episodes. But I have still used the nebulizer (even was able to use it on her once while she was sleeping and I could hear wheezing). I do have spacer but she is less effective in proper use. I hope that you DS is doing better.
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#59 of 81 Old 05-07-2009, 08:34 AM
 
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My DD had her first wheezing at 2. The ped used nebulizer in office but sent us home with liquid albuterol. I talked with my neighbor whose DS had years of problems. She offered her nebulizer and we switched to Xopenex. The treatment is much more effective and with less alertness. Nothing is worse than having a child wired on meds when all need sleep. She is now 3.5 with much less episodes. But I have still used the nebulizer (even was able to use it on her once while she was sleeping and I could hear wheezing). I do have spacer but she is less effective in proper use. I hope that you DS is doing better.
Xopenex! thats what my ds used over the winter and it was soo much better for him then the albuterol.. No side effects at all.

~Jaclyn~ Mama to Lucas Wyatt born 5-3-06
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#60 of 81 Old 05-07-2009, 12:46 PM
 
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Just for future reference, and you might already know this: a 95% oxygen saturation is the lower end of "okay." It's not grading like a test. If your O2 sat. is 90% you're in deep respiratory trouble (failure). If you take a look at the Oxygen-Hemoglobin Saturation Curve you can see that just a small change in oxygen saturation results in a large change in PaO2 in the lungs. It doesn't take much!
This is troubling to me. My 22 month old DS was in the hospital (top notch Children's hospital) twice last week with breathing problems due to a bad virus. They sent us home when his sats were going between 92 and 97. During his nap they had dipped to 88 and even 87 for a moment. The docs said this was normal and that all people have sats in low 90s /high 80s during deep sleep. Why would they say that if he was near respiratory failure? He seems fine since we got home but your info makes me nervous.

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