Saying No to Nebulizer for Toddlers? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 02:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by wonderwahine View Post
this is kind of OT, but mamas with dc's who have been DX with asthma, what did it take to get that? ds is officially just "wheezy" sometimes and we have the neb for when he has wheezing or problems breathing when sick, but I want a diagnosis, and my peds in the past have seemed reluctant to do it since he's so young. But I know in my heart its asthma, I'm asthmatic, his grandmother is, my brother and one of his sons have chronic bronchitis and severe asthma, and his other son has mild asthma. So its definatly genetic on my side, and I really want it to be official in his medical records. When I am at the ER anytime and explain the nebulizer, they instantly ask if he has asthma, and I have to go through the whole story about how hes not diagnoised yet and explain his problems, some of the nurses roll their eyes sympatheticly because I'm sure they have come across peds reluctant to diagnois.
hmmm . . . i don;'t know what it typically takes, but do know that "they" like to call these symptoms reactive airway disorder for a while. afterds's rsv/penumonia hospitalization when he was 10 mo., his ped called it RAD. then last fall when things started going downhill again after the summer, we went to an asthma/allergy specialist for a number of reasons including the breathing. our dr said RAD IS asthma in a prettier package with a bow on top. so we got a dx around 18 months after seeing a specialist.
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#62 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 04:35 PM
 
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They didn't give us a diagnosis until there was an obvious pattern either. It seemed like they wanted to stay with the reactive airway diagnosis for a while. One doctor said that the asthma diagnosis can follow them around for too long( later job prospects? Insurance?) and that they like to be sure of it before it ends up in thier chart.

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#63 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 04:40 PM
 
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My ds also had RSV and was hospitalized for it when he was 23 months. Now whenever he gets a cold it goes straight to his chest. I find that if we use the nebulizer right away then we avoid steroids all together. This is very important to me because steroids are a very harmful medication and he doesn't sleep and acts crazy when he is on them.
I haven't heard many negatives about using a nebulizer, however I haven't really reseached it too well either. I just know I want to avoid steroids as much as possible.

My dd was a noisy breather and then got brociolitis at about 3 months and so it leads to the same time issues. We have a nebulizer and I just love the reassurence of having in the house. Having to have gone to the ER b/c of breathing its not a fun thing and if I can avoid it all together I will. I use it at first onset and then I can avoid the steroids. I hate using the steriods they make her shake and make her act nuts and its just seems to be havioc on her little system. So I am all for early action when it comes to breathing issues.
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#64 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 09:00 PM
 
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Lovechild... I agree that you can have really wonderful sucess with homeopathics. We had started off using a homeopath with the boys and were starting to see results. The problem for us was that we spent a lot of money and it is a bit of a process. In the meantime we ended up in the hospital. The doctors and nurses were sccreaming medical neglect and we felt that the best thing to do was to go on the meds. At almost 50 dollars a week for meds per kid, we could not afford to continue with the homeopathy. Just to say that many homeopaths will work in conjunction with the meds. Since we are heading into the cold season though I think it is important to remember that homeopathics( while wonderful) take time and heavy experience to show improvement... and that you don't always have that time to play with. Docs in my experience do not accept homeopathy as a valid alternative...
wow thats a lot of money! Grey's treatment costed $60 for two months of treatment. Modalities vary by practitioner and I also did have one practitioner before I found our current naturopath who I spent far too much money on and never saw results (Grey kept getting sick and ending up on the neb). In our situation, even our ped. advised us to only use the neb when he was sick, so I didn't really have to deal with making the either/or choice. I took Grey to our current naturopath right after he had gotten over the flu and since doing the homeopathics and Chinese herbal remedy he hasn't had any problems with his breathing or lungs at all. He has had a couple colds that just never got into his lungs. The first cold he had after his homeopathic and herbal protocol, I was watching him like a hawk wondering "ok will we need the neb?" I waited and waited and Grey got better in just a couple days and never had any problems.
Grey used to be the kind of child who would really scare you with his wheezing and coughing and I definately agree with using meds such as albuterol to get a child out of the "danger zone" so to speak, but I feel that when you have a child who can't get a cold without having major breathing problems like Grey used to be, then that is a sign that there is some sort of imbalance going on and I had to find someone who could help me find the root cause of it and heal it. I'm lucky to have found the excellent naturopath I have.

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#65 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 09:35 PM
 
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My dd has this exact form of asthma as well, and we take a somewhat conservative yet mostly mainstream approach. About the second night after a runny nose/cold, it'll drop down into her lungs and we've got asthma. We have about 1 attack a month in the winter months, none of very few in the summer. About 6 total attacks per year. She has no other "triggers" and is perfectly healthy the rest of the time.
Our protocol is this. During an acute attack, we use the nebulizer, with albuterol and cromolyn in it. For those of you not aware of cromolyn, it acts like a steroid (it is a mast cell stabilizer) but it is NOT a steroid, so it does not have sterois side effects. Dr. Sears calls it a "steroid alternative" for those who really want to try and avoid steroids. Our doc, who is an MD, but specializes in alternative medicine, recommends it. We also have a script for steroids, that we can fill if an attack is not getting better or lasting more than 2 days or so - we have NEVER had to use it. During her worst attacks, we have used the neb up to every 2 hours, but usually, it is more like 2-3 times a day. We have found that giving SERIOUS doses of vitamin C during the outbreak REALLY reduces the time she spends sick. She just had an attack, her first of this season, runny nose started Weds, started vit C weds evening, had a pretty rough night weds, but not actual asthma, massive doses of C all day thurs, and finally, *one* neb treatment Thurs night - woke up fine Fri morning.
Our doc really recommends strengthening the body as a whole, of course, especially eating a massive amount of green vegetables as the main portion fo your diet, getting enough vitamins, exercise,etc. These have really helped as well.

We were also offerred 2 alternative treatments. One is an herbal remedy called "yamoa" that she tried with her own son (also an asthmatic), but said he was allergic to it, so she had to stop it. (We chose not to try it right now, she is too young and too willful to try and get to take a bitter tasting herb every day - pergaps when she is older, we'll give her the option) And also something called UVBI which is hooking you up to a needle thing like an IV, i guess, but instead of putting something in you, it draws some blood OUT, and then it runs through an UV light thing, which does something to your blood to make you healthy. i'm too tired to be more specific, look it up, LOL! She said she gets great results with that on numerous maladies, and her son, if he gets a treatment every couple months, does'nt even have asthma or some of his other health problems. We declined that due to partly my needle phobia and also because it was the first time we had ever heard of it and wanted to research it before we did anything. We might also try it when dd is older, but for now, the "mainstream" meds we are taking are working for us, and we are happy with it.

CPST
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#66 of 156 Old 10-13-2007, 11:48 PM
 
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Thanks for this note -- this thread surely has raised a lot of passionate voices. I definitely want to try homeopathy based on what you wrote and what one other person wrote above -- I even feel like it would make me feel less powerless to do so.

(One thing almost everyone is leaving out of this discussion is how hard it is to get kids to do the nebulizer, let alone the steroids -- my son gets so crazily wild and upset, and the whole thing turns into a CIO situation, though sometimes I can do it while he is sleeping. With steroids, forget it -- he is on the floor pleading with me not to take it, and then it turns him into a monster once he has taken it.)

But my issue is that I went to a homeopath last year on the recommendation of someone on this forum. He was HORRIBLE -- very mean and abrupt and almost yelling at me because I couldn't keep an 18-mo old boy still in his office for a full hour. I was almost crying in the office and he kept telling me to sit down because he had to tell me more (and everything he said was things I knew, like taking those Nordic naturals gels). He tried to charge me $250 for the visit, and I kind of bargained him down to $200, in tears. And then what he gave us didn't work at all, and it was so hard to get my son to take it. He gave us a small "serving" of it in unmarked paper envelopes so that we'd be forced to come back, and I didn't know what it was so I couldn't keep trying it.

I have no idea how to find a good one, since the one highly recommended on this site (by a local mama) was so terrible in my view. I can't afford such high fees either. I did find a homeopath in one directory who is an MD, and thus who would be covered by my insurance, so I was thinking of trying him though he sounded a bit odd on the phone. If I could find a very trust-inspiring, kind and gentle homeopath here in NYC, I would gladly try it -- if I can afford it.

What a rambling note -- sorry! Just feeling blue from this thread.
I'm sorry we are bringing you down. Asthma is very scary, and it is hard to face.
I would definitely encourage you to do your research, make choices based on facts, not just what we tell you. The National Jewish Med. Ctr. site I linked to is a really good place to start. They even have a hotline you can call and talk to someone.
Also I can totally relate to "how hard it is to do" - my DD has NLD - she is Special Needs, very sensitive, especially to noises, and was much worse at age 4. We had to use the nebulizer for many years because she was unwilling to use an inhaler, even with a spacer, because of the taste. Oral steroids were a disaster, because of the taste. (Orapred is the best tasting, but it must be refrigerated at all times, or it will taste horrible too.)
We had many many times of doing the nebulizer while she screamed, and we had to just sit and hold her, and get through it. It is only CIO if you leave them alone - what we did was crying in arms, we were in it with her, and in my opinion, having seen her literally at death's door, it was completely necessary! It was very hard, but I would do much harder things to keep my daughter alive.
I think this is a passionate thread because we all hate that our children have to struggle with it, but I for one never want you to have to learn it the way I did, being told by a resp. therapist that my daughter came very close to death. Heck, I could tell how close to death she was, and I didn't know much about asthma then.
You cannot keep medicine that will help your child from them when they need it, no matter how much they hate it.
I think it is because of the effectiveness of the medicines today that people do not seem to take asthma seriously, but people die from asthma every day.

I'm sorry to be so harsh. I just want you to realize this is not like, hmmm, should we do abx for an ear infection? This is literally a situation where your child could die. Try homeopathy if you like, but make sure his asthma is controlled.

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#67 of 156 Old 10-14-2007, 12:12 AM
 
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There is such great info on here. Again with the homeopathy... I fully agree with you Lovechild! We were seeing such amazing results on a whole with homeopathy ( not to do with the asthma, but definitely seeing movement happening!) I am definitely a believer. My concerns only came from my experience of trying to find a way to control the asthma naturally when it would have been a better choice to give the western meds priority. If you can afford both , by all means! But if you are in a place financially where seeing a natural practitioner is stretching it, playing it safe with the meds is most likely your best bet. I am one of the last people who would have many good things to say about allopathic medications... this is one area where there isn't a lot of room to be wrong. Taking the meds has allowed us to be stable on a whole... enough to wean off them instead of being in a constant snowballing situation.
It is a great reminder though to go back to the root cause using homeopathy... It is such a wonderful option when you find someone who is truly great in the field. I started to write what things happened when we were doing homeopathy... it was really wild. Soooooo intense. It made a lot of things worse initially..... But soooo worth it in the end.

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#68 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 10:38 AM
 
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Hi! I am new here, and trying so desperatly to figure out my sons resperitory issues on my own since I do not have alot of trust in his pediatrician.

He has spent 2 fall/winters sick, since he was 2. (He is 4 now) and basically what happens is that seasonal allergys kick his butt all fall and it gets so bad that his sinuses get infected constantly.

Last winter, he was sick, with allergys, and we ended up taking to an urgent care center because he could hardly move.

They gave us a nebulizer and sent us on our way.

The pediatrician (who I belive is an allergy specialist) diagnosed him with asthma and told us to neb everyday. I did for a little while but then I decied just to do it as needed. I dont want the side effects from the steroids on my young son. Too severe.

I do not know if he has asthma or not. I feel like EVERYONE is being diagnosed with it and I am not so sure. He said he has asthma because of wheezing. thats it-wheezing. I think other things can cause wheezing. (Allergys!)

So my quest is to keep my guy safe and not use the nebulizer as much as possible but I am having a very hard time nderstanding asthma. It seems so vague, and the websites that talk about it dont really seem to treat it as its own medical diagnosis. Its always coupled with something else.

Very hard to understand disease. Is asthma a disease?

Anyways, thats our story!

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#69 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 10:52 AM
 
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yes asthma is a disease, and allergy triggered asthma is just as dangerous as every other form of asthma.
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#70 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 12:36 PM
 
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Yes, it is a disease, and if you didn't follow my linky above I'll link it again...
http://www.njc.org/disease-info/dise...hma/index.aspx

And wheezing is the hallmark of asthma. One does not wheeze from allergies.

And again, inhaled steroids act directly on the lungs, where they are needed, and so side effects are minimized. It is vastly preferable to use inhaled steroids via neb than to not use it, then have to take oral steroids which act on the body as a whole, with all associated side effects.

Again I will repeat, you cannot take asthma lightly. My DH is a paramedic, and on his last shift responded to a female in her 30's who had asthma, and had used her neb too late, and/or called 911 too late. She DIED under his hands - her heart stopped. They were able to revive her, she was ventilated, but the doc told them she would be able to come off the vent the same day and should be able to go home the next day. BUT the hospital/doctor was very impressed with the paramedics, because only 2% of asthma attacks where cardiac arrest occurs have a positive outcome.
I was not exaggerating when I said people die from this every day. If your child has asthma, you need to get it under control and keep it under control. Do your research, but take it seriously!

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#71 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 01:13 PM
 
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I'll tell you the same thing I told the doctor-I will not medicate my child out of fear. I will take it seriously, but I wont be so scared that I will do whatever the doctors tell me to do.

Asthma related deaths are extremley rare and most of the occur in poor 3rd world countrys. (80% according to WHO)

I am reading a great book called "healing the new childhood epidenmics - adhd, asthma, allergies, and autism" Its got alot of great info-I would suggest anyone who is dealing with this check it out!
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#72 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 01:34 PM
 
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Transformed, I think you need to see an allergist or a pediatric pulmonologist. It sounds like you are not communicating with your ped very well about this, and it's vital that you do have good communication with a doctor. I'm confused by the advice to use the neb every day. Albuterol is a quick-acting "rescue" medication to be used when a child is having active breathing trouble. It is used when the child has symptoms, not every day whether the child is fine or not. It is also not a steroid. Are you sure the doctor didn't recommend daily Pulmicort by nebulizer? This IS an inhaled steroid that works as a preventative. You DO take it every day.

As was explained upthread, you should know that if push comes to shove and your DS gets very sick and needs oral steroids (and trust me, if you're in the place where you need this you will not want to refuse this), he will get just as much exposure from one 5-DAY course of that as he would from one YEAR of inhaled steroids...plus the oral steroids have nasty side effects. Inhaled steroids are not absorbed systemically like those taken by mouth.

But it sounds to me like you need more advice on the allergies. It's possible that a mild allergy med such as Singulair or Zyrtec would help your boy. There are also nasal sprays. You could try a sinus rinse, such as NeilMed sinus rinse. We do this twice a day with our 3.5yo and it's really helped. It is is nonpharmaceutical.

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#73 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 01:41 PM
 
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I belive what I have is pulmicort. (It is from last winter, I need to check the box) I am concerned with the issues with the teeth that steroids have though.

The ped we see happens to be an allergy specialist but when I asked him to draw blood to test for food allergys last year he got very mad at me and we got in a big fight! (I was convinced it was dairy-which the blood test said it wasnt, )

I just cant seem to find a doctor who is an advocate for my son, because I am not commited to medicating him daily for the rest of his life. (Especially because the symptoms only present during certain times of the year! kwim?)

I see a link between allergys/asthma and toxins in the enviornment and the friggin doctors dont seem to get it. If they were a little bit more holistic we would be able to play nice but all they want to do is medicate the symptoms!

I need to keep a list of all the things we have tried because offhand I dont remember...I have done all of those medicines but they werent enough.

What I havent done is a strict diet change. Thats the path I am on right now, but I am alone-my dh doesnt really get it either, the link between toxic foods and asthma/allergys.

What do you all do with diet? What has worked? What hasnt?

I just started a thread to get some help on diet, we are totally processed at the moment.
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#74 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 01:42 PM
 
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Loraxc -

How on earth do you get your 3.5 year old to use the sinus rinse? (I can barely stand to use the sinus rinse myself!)

I've been trying to think of better things to do to help my DD (allergies and asthma) and the sinus rinse crossed my mind but I can't figure out how to convince her it's a good idea. We're currently doing albuterol as needed, singulair, and zyrtec and are on the second course of oral steroids in the last 2 months. There must be more preventative that we can do but I can't figure out what it is. Our ped says that we're doing all we can do.

TIA!

Unschooling mama to one 5 year old DD.
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#75 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 01:42 PM
 
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PS-I am not sure if what he has going on right now is a virual cold, or allergys because his sister started sniffling earlier today too. And I just gave him a dose of pulmicort in the nebulizer and he couldnt finish it he was coughing so bad. The nebulizer brought on the coughing this time and ever since, an hour ago, he hasnt stopped coughing. That seems like a weird reaction to nebulizer, in the past it always helped the coughing.
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Loraxc -

How on earth do you get your 3.5 year old to use the sinus rinse? (I can barely stand to use the sinus rinse myself!)

I've been trying to think of better things to do to help my DD (allergies and asthma) and the sinus rinse crossed my mind but I can't figure out how to convince her it's a good idea. We're currently doing albuterol as needed, singulair, and zyrtec and are on the second course of oral steroids in the last 2 months. There must be more preventative that we can do but I can't figure out what it is. Our ped says that we're doing all we can do.

TIA!
Is that similar to neti pot? I tried it on ds last night but I couldnt get him to do it either. That would work wonders! I am the only one in the family without allergys and I am the only one who uses the neti!

I am curious too, 3.5 yr old!?!?
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#77 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 02:03 PM
 
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The pulmicort, from what I understand, helps keep the airways open in the long term. The doctors have told me that it won't start working at all for about 12 hours.... but that you should be on the inhaled steroids All through the cold season. I think that the pulmicort was more expensive than taking an inhaled steroid med with a spacer. When we were at our worst we had the boys on a steroid puffer through the cold season only. It had been recommended that we be on it all year long. We wean ourselves off of it sometime in the spring usually. ( this wouldnt be right or recommended for anyone else nessisarily, but it is the choice we made for ourselves against the doctors orders) It sounds as though you havent been prescribed an emergency med at all?
Making the home allergy proof made a HUGE difference for us. A really good hepa vacume, good filters for rooms and furnace, allergy bedcovers, and a stringent washing routine really helped us. The asthma sites usually have great recommendations for this. Paring down on what is in the room that the kids sleep in is a really good idea. Minimalist is good.... think no surfaces for allergens to collect.( we put books in a cupboard that closes tight. We freeze stuffies and pillows for a couple of days every couple of weeks ( only a favourite stuffie in the room allowed type of thing) Sounds strict, but they got wayyyy fewer colds this way and it allowed us to take much less medicine in the long run.
As far as food sensitivities go... we made some big changes in this regard for other health related reasons. I didnt notice at the time . but when it came to gluten up for a test my oldest had a major asthma attack that night. It doesnt hurt to figure out where the sensitivities are in order to help the body function at its best in my opinion. Otherwise we keep the diet super clean... no sugars, dyes, preservatives. The boys take a really good multi daily as well as cod liver oil through the fall winter and part of spring. We keep vitamin C on hand. They take an herbal tincture made especially for them as well that helps with seasonal allergies as well. Otherwise I just try to keep them really nourished, well hydrated and encourage hand washing.

We only had one hospital visit last year.... down from literally dozens. EEp!

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#78 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 02:14 PM
 
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Loraxc -

How on earth do you get your 3.5 year old to use the sinus rinse? (I can barely stand to use the sinus rinse myself!)
It's easier than a neti pot, IMO. I have used a neti on myself and I don't think we could do it with DD. She doesn't have to tilt her head like she would for a neti.

Here is how we do it: we prepare the solution and put a bowl in the sink. She gets up on a stool and we clip her hair back. She leans straight over the sink and we squirt the stuff up. She blows her nose. We alternate nostrils till it's gone. When she's done, we make a BIG deal out of what a great job she did and she gets a treat. : It's a whole-wheat fig bar or sesame halvah, so it could be worse.

It used to make her cough and choke some, which scared her, till I read about a trick where you say the word "Click" and it closes your soft palate to keep the water out of your throat. That works.

It WAS NOT EASY when it first started and we both cried about it several times. We gave up quite a few attempts at the beginning because we were both too upset. However, DD has been really ill with her asthma, sinusitis and allergies and is motivated to do things that will help. She got more used to it the more we did it, and the treats don't hurt (now she sometimes will even say she doesn't need one). It also helped to make a big deal out of "EEWWWW! LOOK AT THE GROOOOOSS STUFF IN YOUR NOSE!" (kids love that). We also got sinus rinse bottles for ourselves, and DH uses his regularly. If she's feeling balky, she will often ask him to do his first. We make a big deal out of how he can't possibly be as brave as she is and she has to cheer him on.

It is still not the easiest part of the day and she still sometimes doesn't want to do it, but it's been worth it for us.

If you could get your DS tested for his allergies, you could do allergy reduction methods at home. DD tested allergic to dust mites and cockroaches (ew, but we live in an old house in the deep South) so we got very aggressive about keeping her room dust-free and baiting for roaches (I didn't use to do this because I don't like the chemicals).

DD also takes tons of C, a multi, and acidophilus. We tried cod liver oil but didn't notice that it did anything.

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We're currently doing albuterol as needed, singulair, and zyrtec and are on the second course of oral steroids in the last 2 months. There must be more preventative that we can do but I can't figure out what it is.
You're not doing Pulmicort? If you've needed oral steroids twice, please ask about an inhaled steroid! Sometimes general peds are not that knowledgable about asthma. We got nowhere till we saw specialists.

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I just cant seem to find a doctor who is an advocate for my son, because I am not commited to medicating him daily for the rest of his life.
I am sure not committed to that either--I would love for DD to go off as many meds as possible, and her pulmo is on board for us to try tapering and weaning when it seems appropriate. We have recently stepped down her inhaled steroid and experimented with taking her off Singulair with his blessing.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#79 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 02:15 PM
 
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I feel so lucky to have tile throughout the house. Now if I could only get around to cleaning it and sweeping more than once a year.

Tile makes it easy to be lazy. You hardly have to do anything to care for it, and all the dust pushes into the corners and is easy to forget about.
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#80 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 02:38 PM
 
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I'll tell you the same thing I told the doctor-I will not medicate my child out of fear. I will take it seriously, but I wont be so scared that I will do whatever the doctors tell me to do.

Asthma related deaths are extremley rare and most of the occur in poor 3rd world countrys. (80% according to WHO)

I am reading a great book called "healing the new childhood epidenmics - adhd, asthma, allergies, and autism" Its got alot of great info-I would suggest anyone who is dealing with this check it out!
By no means am I telling you to do whatever the doctors tell you out of fear. And I am not scare-mongering - I am just frustrated by people not taking asthma seriously. After seeing my daughter at death's door, literally, she was very close to death, I have learned to take it seriously. I have done a lot of research, and I have fought with doctors. I have found what works for my daughter, and I am not telling anyone else what is right for their child - I am just saying Take it seriously! Do your research! Treat the asthma preventatively, not waiting for attacks to occur!

Every day in America, 11 people will die from Asthma.
http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources...statistics.stm

That is just wrong, in a first world country where we have medicine which can control it.

I am curious what "issues with the teeth" from steroids you mean? My DD has been on inhaled steroids for 5 years, and her teeth are fine. I am not aware of that being a concern. It actually is a bigger concern of developing thrush, and one should always rinse out the mouth afterward to prevent that. Slowed growth is a very valid concern, and we have seen that, but studies show they do regain that slowed growth - we have seen that too.

Also, you need to learn about the medications, when to give them, why you are giving them, when you can taper off or go without and when you can't. Do not expect your doctor to tell you all this; you need to be proactive and do the research and learn how it all applies to and affects your child. You are your child's best advocate!

By all means, look into alternative things; getting rid of our cats ( made a huge difference for my DD, and getting her into swimming also has made a huge difference. A HEPA air filter in her room, also helped. You may find things like that which can really help.

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#81 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 02:43 PM
 
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We have a cat. I keep letting it outside hoping it wil run away.

Ds tested positive for cat allergys but we still only notice allergy problems in the winter???

We havent gotten rid of the cat yet, and would proabbly have a real hard time taking a cat with a broken tail.
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#82 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 03:00 PM
 
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The explanation I was given for allergies is like "the straw that broke the camel's back" - that our bodies can accomodate a lot, but once a certain limit is reached, we cannot take any more and our system is overwhelmed. So one's asthma could be just fine, but if one eats something which is mildly hard on our system (like corn, with my DH - he can't eat it in the fall!) - maybe even something you don't even know is bothersome - and then is exposed to say, a pollen in the air, maybe you still wouldn't see symptoms, but then if you had to ride in a car with a smoker, BAM asthma attack - and you think it is the smoker, but really, you would have been fine with the smoke if your body wasn't coping with the corn and the pollen too. Does that make sense?
We had cats since before kids, so she was exposed all her life, and I kept saying, but if she was allergic to cats, we would know! Well, she is allergic to cats, when we had the testing done it was clear. She could tolerate it most of the time, but then in the spring and fall, she was suffering from seasonal allergies as well, and then if she caught a cold it was straight to the oral steroid, ON TOP of inhaled steroids, singulair, and albuterol every 4 hours. I tried everything, we were down to one cat, regularly groomed (anyone ever tried to bathe a cat? : YIKES!) but we could not get her asthma back under control. So poor cat had to go... we did find him a home, with a pre-teen who loved him. And she has not had an oral steroid since. : I hated to have that kind of proof that I will not be able to have a cat.....
Maybe someday.... and DH is so severely allergic to dogs...

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#83 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 07:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We have found that giving SERIOUS doses of vitamin C during the outbreak REALLY reduces the time she spends sick. S.
Thanks for these tips -- very interesting and helpful!

What is a massive dose of vitamin C? I use the gummy bears as he will take those but what do you use/how do you get it in?
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#84 of 156 Old 10-15-2007, 07:41 PM
 
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#85 of 156 Old 10-31-2007, 11:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Two weeks later and we're in another horrible episode (and as a side note, trying to get through it while Greenwich Village Halloween parade goes on on streets below with the loudest most screaming obnoxious people in the world not caring about DS's asthma!), so I read through all these threads again and suddenly it clicked! Thank you, Mamas. I realize that this is not okay for him to be like this every two weeks, and I am going to try the daily pulmicort (but will try to give him summers off!). I am very scared to do this and just very scared lying beside him breathing so fast even after nebulizers all day. But it suddenly clicked on reading this that he really does have asthma all the time, and it is just being triggered too often, and that maybe it is doing more harm to him to have these attacks than to give him something everyday that could prevent them. How amazing it would be if we could stop them, and I think I could see doing the nebulizer every night after he goes to sleep.

Also trying homeopathy but so far this hasn't worked.

I feel so sad!

But thankful for all the advice, which a few weeks ago I read with much defensiveness and now just with understanding.
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#86 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 12:23 AM
 
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I am sorry you have to go through this! I wish I could give you a hug.
It really is worth it on the meds... It won't likely be forever. ( we have only had to use the meds twice so far this yearand we havent started the daily meds since last winter yet)
Thank you so much for the update! Let us know how it goes with the meds.

:
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#87 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 03:12 AM
 
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I'm so sorry you're in this boat too. Stinks, doesn't it? We're still here for you if you need to vent, y'know?

Helen mum to five and mistress of mess and mayhem, making merry and mischief til the sun goes down.
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#88 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 05:23 PM
 
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#89 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 05:35 PM
 
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Sorry to hijack, but is there a tribe for asthmatics/moms of asthmatics around anywhere? If not, do we want to go start one? I don't know about anyone else, but I've actually found that talking with Evie has really helped me on my journey, and it would be great to have that support on a more regular basis.
Whaddaya think?

Helen mum to five and mistress of mess and mayhem, making merry and mischief til the sun goes down.
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#90 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 05:38 PM
 
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First
Then let me say that I feel like I could bang my head against a wall with my DD's ped. He wont refer us to a asthma doc, wont give her a neb, wont give her anything else except Albuterol and when it doesnt work said that there is nothing he can do for her cause she is only 23mo. I feel like I am talking to a wall.
So hopefully in December I can convince him to do something about her breathing. It seems like DD picks the perfect time to breathe like an angel when we go into the docs office....
I wish you and your LO all the best though.

Mom to Bouncy Breastfed fly-by-nursing1.gifDD energy.gifLoving Woman to DH, RIP DS Born at 22 weeks  ribbonpb.gif

 

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