Saying No to Nebulizer for Toddlers? - Page 4 - Mothering Forums

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#91 of 156 Old 11-01-2007, 06:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jess12808 View Post
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Then let me say that I feel like I could bang my head against a wall with my DD's ped. He wont refer us to a asthma doc, wont give her a neb, wont give her anything else except Albuterol and when it doesnt work said that there is nothing he can do for her cause she is only 23mo. I feel like I am talking to a wall.
So hopefully in December I can convince him to do something about her breathing. It seems like DD picks the perfect time to breathe like an angel when we go into the docs office....
I wish you and your LO all the best though.
Can you switch to a different primary Dr who will refer you to a specialist?

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#92 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 12:26 AM
 
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My son is 2, and I didn't really feel like I knew what I was doing until the second specialist that we saw. DS also has asthma that's brought on by colds- its not constant. Here's my 2 cents:

First, Transformed- I am under the impression that Pulmicort is a preventative med. If it's not helping your child, maybe they need a rescue med like albuterol, to be used when an attack is already underway.

One of the biggest obstacles for me was figuring out what "wheezing" meant. No one tells you. At first, I thought it literally meant a wheezing noise and labored breathing, which is how my dad would often sound, but with my son it's often just a lot of coughing that could easily be mistaken for a tickle in his throat or post nasal drip- his breathing never seems labored and he's never lethargic. It's only after taking the better safe than sorry approach and giving him the neb with albuterol that I realized it stopped the coughing immediately and he would be fine. Another sign I was told to look for is that little dent at the base of your neck, where the bones come together, when that is sucked in at each breath is a sign of trouble.

Even though I was told to use pulmicort 2x a day at the first sign of a cold, I never do (because I always thinkg he'll be fine this time) and end up needing to do the albuterol much more often. This time around though, I was able to put both meds in the neb, and i've been able to do away with the albuterol if I get the pulmicort into him no more than 12 hours after the last dose. It has made a huge difference. He is not as hyper as on the albuterol, he naps, he's nice. I agree that steroids really bring out the devil in them, but thank god for them.

As for keeping him calm during treatments, right now what works best is to put an extra mask on his favorite stuffed animal and tell him that "Peeby" needs a treatment, and will he do it too? Then every few minutes I'll say Oh, Peeby! in a very sad, sympathetic tone. I think it helps keep the focus off his treatment. Also I'll put on his favorite sesame street video, or read a bunch of books. Sometimes we just have to hold him down though even though he fights and stuggles. It's such a tough situation to be in.
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#93 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 12:11 PM
 
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When I was in the panic of trying to figure it all out ( imagine trying to figure it out with two kids at once!) I found it really helpful to have an asthma plan all written out. I know up here in BC they have asthma clinics in the major city centers. A specialist will show you proper techniques to give the medication... including tips for when it isnt going right. I also had a plan written out for how many times a day the medication was expected to be given and when. For acute periods, how many times a day to take emergency meds. And a clear written plan of action ( exactly when ) for when I would bring him into emerg. Our emergency room is a 20 min drive away and we were having problems with them sending us home after stabalisation with instructions just to give the rescue meds back to back if need be. ( which is so obviously stupid and dangerous advice) The ped wrote out ( and we laminated) directions for the emergency room staff and for us , that if we used the meds more than X amount of times , in X amount of hours, or if he couldnt speak in complete sentances to come into the emergency ward. He then had clear instructions for the staff to admit him to the pediatric ward and to call him. I also find it helpful to have an extra prescription for the meds tucked away in my wallet.
We were lucky to be given a neb machine that is a travel one ( it is a smaller size... we use it for our main neb) I have a special padded case for it where I keep everything together... meds, tubes, masks, instructions in a zippered compartment. This has been used so many times when we go away from home. Other peoples houses seem to have more allergens and the excitement of travelling always leaves the kids a little run down.

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#94 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 12:40 PM
 
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Has anyone else come across the use of magnesium sulphate to break an attack, btw? a 1yo friend of ours was admitted recently with a first attack, and rather than giving salbutamol back-to-back, after the fourth dose of salbutamol they gave him magnesium something-or-other. Apparently the hospital recognises that hyperactivity doesn't make breathing easier.

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#95 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 01:06 PM
 
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first hugs to you sweet mama! nights can be terrifying.

my 15 month old son continued to have respiratory distress about every 2 months during his first year. It was aweful. After the 4th bout they said he probably had asthma. He was put on xopenex and pulmicort as needed (at the first sign of a cough) via nebulizer at 5.5 months old. We used it ALOT. I cant really say they help him. ITs hard to know but he definitely does not have immeidate improvement on them. Xopenex is fast acting...and pulmicort is slow acting...taking 3 - 7 days for inflammation to reduce.

The last specialist we visited (pediatric allergy /asthma) said he very well may not have asthma..especially since the drugs dont have obvious benefits. If the drugs work...its a confirmation of asthma.

My son is on singular 4mg granules everyday. I dont like it. We are going to do a test or control study on him starting next week. I just want to see where he is at without it. Thats always scary too...hate for him to tumble back into danger...but i just have to know. Hate to have him on a drug he has outgrown the need for.

My overall point here is that...if the drugs help then definitely use them. However if you do not see improvement...question them...and get the opinion of as many specialists as you can afford. I am so sorry you both are going through this. It is scary as hell. Twice a month does seem excessive...and likely to be asthma. Have hope...you will be able to find the right mix of lifestyle changes and drugs so that you can manage his health challenges..and life a normal life! Much love to you and your familiy.
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#96 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 03:57 PM
 
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Evie, I am sorry he is suffering with this.
I think I understand where you are, it is so hard to accept something so hard for our children. I hope you are able to get him stable and well, once you are in a good place I am sure it will be easier to explore what you need to do, and how you can improve his life, find his triggers, and minimize the meds.

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Originally Posted by jess12808 View Post
First
Then let me say that I feel like I could bang my head against a wall with my DD's ped. He wont refer us to a asthma doc, wont give her a neb, wont give her anything else except Albuterol and when it doesnt work said that there is nothing he can do for her cause she is only 23mo. I feel like I am talking to a wall.
So hopefully in December I can convince him to do something about her breathing. It seems like DD picks the perfect time to breathe like an angel when we go into the docs office....
I wish you and your LO all the best though.
Jess, also big for you. Singulair might be a good thing, dosing starts at 12 months - their site has a thing on "Talking to your Doctor"
here
and Pulmicort in the nebulizer also begins at 12 months.
here

Helen, I think you are absolutely right; if there isn't already a tribe we need to start it. I nominate you our leader!
There is just so much out there about asthma, it is hard to know what to do and who to trust about all this info. I totally think we could learn so much from each other. (Can we start with the mag. thing?)

cushy, I was told by a respiratory specialist when my DD was in hospital that Pulmicort should not be mixed in the neb. w/albuterol, and the pharmacist I trust agreed. I was told the very most effective way was to do albuterol first, then wait 5 minutes, then do Pulmicort - this allows the albuterol to begin working, to open up the airways, to allow the Pulmicort to be more effective. If you check the literature which comes with Pulmicort, it also says not to mix it. I know some say it is ok, but I want to get the most out of these meds, since I am making my DD take them.

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#97 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 04:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cushy View Post
My son is 2, and I didn't really feel like I knew what I was doing until the second specialist that we saw.

One of the biggest obstacles for me was figuring out what "wheezing" meant. No one tells you. At first, I thought it literally meant a wheezing noise and labored breathing, which is how my dad would often sound, but with my son it's often just a lot of coughing that could easily be mistaken for a tickle in his throat or post nasal drip- his breathing never seems labored and he's never lethargic. It's only after taking the better safe than sorry approach and giving him the neb with albuterol that I realized it stopped the coughing immediately and he would be fine. Another sign I was told to look for is that little dent at the base of your neck, where the bones come together, when that is sucked in at each breath is a sign of trouble.

... It's such a tough situation to be in.
(Edited for length)
Talking about signs and symptoms, I was amazed at some of the signs of asthma, that I can look back and see that we had those long before the dx. Some kids never wheeze - my DD does not. She just breathes less and less.... The National Jewish Medical and Research Center has a great article on them here

Early Warning Signs of Asthma
Early warning signs are experienced before the start of an asthma episode. By recognizing these clues that occur before actual asthma symptoms, early treatment can be started. These signs are unique to each person. Early warning signs may be the same, similar or entirely different with each episode. Some early warning signs may be noticed only by the individual, while other early warning signs are more likely to be noticed by other persons. In addition, a downward trend in peak flow numbers can be a reliable early warning sign. Some examples of early warning signs are:

Breathing changes
Sneezing
Moodiness
Headache
Runny/stuffy nose
Coughing
Chin or throat itches
Feeling tired
Dark circles under eyes
Trouble sleeping
Poor tolerance for exercise
Downward trend in peak flow number
Get a complete checklist of early warning asthma signs
Asthma Symptoms
Asthma symptoms indicate that an asthma episode is occurring. Examples of asthma symptoms include:

Wheezing
Coughing
Shortness of breath
Tightness in the chest
Peak flow numbers may be in the caution or danger range (usually 50% to 80% of personal best)
Changes have taken place in the airways and airflow is obstructed. Individuals with asthma experience some or all of these during an asthma episode. Action should be taken to treat these symptoms before they become worse. Talk with your healthcare provider about having a written asthma action plan.

Return to top .

Severe Asthma Symptoms
Severe asthma symptoms are a life-threatening emergency. These symptoms indicate respiratory distress. Examples of severe asthma symptoms include:

Severe coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath or tightness in the chest
Difficulty talking or concentrating
Walking causes shortness of breath
Breathing may be shallow and fast or slower than usual
Hunched shoulders (posturing)
Nasal flaring (Nostril size increases with breathing)
Neck area and between or below the ribs moves inward with breathing (retractions)
Gray or bluish tint to skin, beginning around the mouth (cyanosis)
Peak flow numbers may be in the danger zone (usually below 50% of personal best)

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#98 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 04:17 PM
 
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There was a "moms of asthmatics thread" is Special Needs if someone wants to bump it.

I am here today as a voice of hope. DD was VERY ill all last winter and most of last spring and summer. However, she is doing really well right now!! We seem to have hit on a good combination--for us, it is Singulair ( we tried taking her off this and saw a big change for the worse), Rhinocort nasal spray, Advair 45 twice daily (this now comes in an inhaler +spacer like albuterol or Flovent), Prevacid for her reflux, and, I think most importantly, the NeilMed sinus rinse twice daily. I tell you, I am evangelical about that sinus rinse. I think it it actually preventing her from getting colds--and when DD does not get colds, she really does not get serious asthma.

I know it sounds like a lot of meds, but I am so, so happy with her health right now. It's been two and a half months since her last episode. That is almost unheard of.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#99 of 156 Old 11-02-2007, 05:43 PM
 
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and, I think most importantly, the NeilMed sinus rinse twice daily. I tell you, I am evangelical about that sinus rinse. I think it it actually preventing her from getting colds--and when DD does not get colds, she really does not get serious asthma.
All right, I give up. Please please tell me how you taught your daughter to use/tolerate the Sinus Rinse? My dd is only one or two months younger than you, but I can't do it. She sees me use the Neil Med bottle twice a day. She even does something similar herself. I've taught her to give herself 4 good squirts of an over the counter nasal saline spray, but she needs to tilt her head backwards, instead of forwards for the Neil Med bottle. I tried once to get her to use the Neil Med bottle, and she willingly tried it, but the first squirt really scared her. After that, she insisted that the bottle was "too big". Fortunately, she will do the OTC nasal saline spray, but that's not as much volume as the Neil Med bottle, and I have to go buy the saline every once in a while. (The Neil Med bottle is so convenient because I can make my own powder by myself.)

So please, could you describe to me exactly what you did to teach your daughter how to do it?
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#100 of 156 Old 11-05-2007, 02:33 PM
 
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Please please tell me how you taught your daughter to use/tolerate the Sinus Rinse?
See post #78 in this thread--I talked about this there. It is still not easy for us to do, but she does tolerate it.

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#101 of 156 Old 11-05-2007, 06:54 PM
 
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It's easier than a neti pot, IMO. I have used a neti on myself and I don't think we could do it with DD. She doesn't have to tilt her head like she would for a neti.

Here is how we do it: we prepare the solution and put a bowl in the sink. She gets up on a stool and we clip her hair back. She leans straight over the sink and we squirt the stuff up. She blows her nose. We alternate nostrils till it's gone. When she's done, we make a BIG deal out of what a great job she did and she gets a treat. : It's a whole-wheat fig bar or sesame halvah, so it could be worse.

It used to make her cough and choke some, which scared her, till I read about a trick where you say the word "Click" and it closes your soft palate to keep the water out of your throat. That works.

It WAS NOT EASY when it first started and we both cried about it several times. We gave up quite a few attempts at the beginning because we were both too upset. However, DD has been really ill with her asthma, sinusitis and allergies and is motivated to do things that will help. She got more used to it the more we did it, and the treats don't hurt (now she sometimes will even say she doesn't need one). It also helped to make a big deal out of "EEWWWW! LOOK AT THE GROOOOOSS STUFF IN YOUR NOSE!" (kids love that). We also got sinus rinse bottles for ourselves, and DH uses his regularly. If she's feeling balky, she will often ask him to do his first. We make a big deal out of how he can't possibly be as brave as she is and she has to cheer him on.

It is still not the easiest part of the day and she still sometimes doesn't want to do it, but it's been worth it for us.

If you could get your DS tested for his allergies, you could do allergy reduction methods at home. DD tested allergic to dust mites and cockroaches (ew, but we live in an old house in the deep South) so we got very aggressive about keeping her room dust-free and baiting for roaches (I didn't use to do this because I don't like the chemicals).

DD also takes tons of C, a multi, and acidophilus. We tried cod liver oil but didn't notice that it did anything.



You're not doing Pulmicort? If you've needed oral steroids twice, please ask about an inhaled steroid! Sometimes general peds are not that knowledgable about asthma. We got nowhere till we saw specialists.



I am sure not committed to that either--I would love for DD to go off as many meds as possible, and her pulmo is on board for us to try tapering and weaning when it seems appropriate. We have recently stepped down her inhaled steroid and experimented with taking her off Singulair with his blessing.
Thanks Loraxc. We'll have to try the neti pot with her. We both use the Neil Med things so maybe if we can find a kid's neti pot, she'd do it.

No, we're not doing Pulmicort. I've asked the doctor a million different times in a million different ways if there's anything else we could be doing to help her and everytime he says no. What kind of specialist should we see? Allergist? And I thought Pulmicort was for 6+, DD is only 3 is Pulmicort really an option?

Thanks again for the help!

Unschooling mama to one 5 year old DD.
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#102 of 156 Old 11-05-2007, 08:11 PM
 
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pulmicort respules (for the nebulizer) are approved for children as young as 1 yr.
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#103 of 156 Old 11-05-2007, 10:19 PM
 
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See post #78 in this thread--I talked about this there. It is still not easy for us to do, but she does tolerate it.
Thank you very much for directing me to the correct post, and thank you very much for typing it all out. I really appreciate it.
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#104 of 156 Old 11-05-2007, 11:56 PM
 
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t. I've asked the doctor a million different times in a million different ways if there's anything else we could be doing to help her and everytime he says no. What kind of specialist should we see? Allergist? And I thought Pulmicort was for 6+, DD is only 3 is Pulmicort really an option?
I'm really surprised he is saying there is nothing else to be done. Yes, Pulmicort is absolutely prescribed for kids as young as 3 and younger. Tell me again about your DD's history?

My DD sees a pediatric pulmonologist (who also does allergy testing), an ear-nose-throat doctor, and a gastrointestinal doc for her reflux (reflux can be a silent cause of asthma), but her main doctor is the pulmo. Can you ask for a referral?

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#105 of 156 Old 11-06-2007, 12:38 AM
 
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Singulair is also available for kids 12 months and up, and it makes a huge difference for my DD.
HTH!

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#106 of 156 Old 11-06-2007, 05:42 PM
 
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Singulair is also available for kids 12 months and up, and it makes a huge difference for my DD.
HTH!
My daughter's pediatrician prescribed Singulair to my daughter at age 6 months, same for pulmicort and albuterol/xopenex. Since then, I've had second opinions from 3 different allergists (some of them pediatric allergists), and they've been fine with that.
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#107 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 01:25 AM
 
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I'm really surprised he is saying there is nothing else to be done. Yes, Pulmicort is absolutely prescribed for kids as young as 3 and younger. Tell me again about your DD's history?

My DD sees a pediatric pulmonologist (who also does allergy testing), an ear-nose-throat doctor, and a gastrointestinal doc for her reflux (reflux can be a silent cause of asthma), but her main doctor is the pulmo. Can you ask for a referral?
DD is a little over 3. She was diaganosed with asthma at 1.5 or 2 years old (I can't remember now) on a follow up visit after a trip to the hospital with pnuemonia (oddly enough not by our current doctor but by one of the other doctors in the practice). She's had bronchitis 4 or 5 times (generally following a cold), 2 of them in the past 3 months. It generally takes antibiotics and an oral steriod to kick the bronchitis. She coughs if she runs around too much (especially if it's cold). She's on Singulair and Zyrtec and we have a nebulizer for albuterol that we use at first sign of a cough.

We live in one of the highest pollen areas of the country so allergies (even for typically "non-sufferers") are high here. I'm reluctant to take her to an allergist because I had the whole 1,000 post test and allergy shots for years and in the end, I'm not so sure it did any good. I hate to put her through that at this age. That said, I clearly also want to do what's best for her and prevent her from having bronchitis all the time!

Can you tell me more about the Pulmicort - I didn't read anything about it once I read that it wasn't supposed to be for under 6ers. Is it a lower dose for under 6ers or was I reading the wrong literature or what? How does it work? It's delivered through a neb? Can it be used also in a puffer? (We're getting DD used to the puffer as we're often away from the house and thus the nebulizer.)

A puminologist specializes in....? We live in a small town so finding a pediatric one might take going to a larger city a couple of hours away...

Thanks for your help! :

Unschooling mama to one 5 year old DD.
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#108 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 11:33 AM
 
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I'll tell you the same thing I told the doctor-I will not medicate my child out of fear. I will take it seriously, but I wont be so scared that I will do whatever the doctors tell me to do.

Asthma related deaths are extremley rare and most of the occur in poor 3rd world countrys. (80% according to WHO)

I am reading a great book called "healing the new childhood epidenmics - adhd, asthma, allergies, and autism" Its got alot of great info-I would suggest anyone who is dealing with this check it out!
I mean no disrespect, but it seems to me the reason that more asthma deaths would occur in 3rd world countries is because the people who have asthma in those countries do not have access to medications and nebulizers and healthcare in general. I'm sure if they did those stats would be reduced dramatically.

Evie - I'm sorry your son is still struggling. I know you're in NYC and might not want to travel out of the city (which always seems counterintuitive) but if you would like the name of an excellent pediatric pulmonologist who is on staff at Schneider Children's Hospital in Nassau County, PM me. My girls were preemies and one of them was on a ventilator for her first 2 weeks, and she sees the pulmonologist every few months for follow-ups. (They are both doing great and she only has breathing issues when she is sick). He is fantastic, very kind, and extremely well-respected in the general medical community. I know it might be a PITA to go out of the city, but if you can't find a specialist in the city, it's a good option.

Betsy, mama to beautiful, strong MZ twins Lillian and Kate, born 11 weeks early on January 10, 2006.
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#109 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 12:12 PM
 
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zmom,
a pulmonologist is a lung specialist.
Pulmicort is a preventative steroid treatment which is given once or twice daily every day to prevent asthma symptoms. For younger children it is given in the neb as a liquid. It is available in a puffer, but since you just give it at set times it should be ok - we did 7 am, and 7 pm when we needed twice a day - high allergy times, or when she was coming down with something.

My DD was dx with allergies at 10 months, and we did see an allergist (once she was older) to determine just what she was allergic to (cats and hamsters but not dogs or horses, pollen but not mold, etc) so we could help her avoid them, but we declined to do shots. It was very helpful for us to get that information, and the testing was not really that hard for her.

The thing I feel has been most helpful for me is a peak flow monitor - it is a small device one blows into, and the reading indicates how well the airways are working. By tracking the numbers, you can see when they are starting to have trouble, sometimes days in advance of an attack, and you can change your treatment accordingly. My first ped said my DD was too young for one at age 5, but when we switched MDs that was the first thing they gave us, and she did it just fine. If you don't have one, talk to your doc, since it does require a prescription as a medical device. They range in cost, about $12 or so on up to about $50, but the cheap ones work fine. Ins may or may not cover it.
HTH

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#110 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 12:26 PM
 
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zmom, I am guessing they haven't given you Pulmicort because they're treating the coughing as the bronchitis, not the asthma...but if you have an official asthma diagnosis and albuterol works, and she coughs with exertion (so does my DD, even when well), I think it should be considered. It's fairly low risk, though there is some evidence it can mildly retard growth. We do seem to be seeing this in my DD. Fortunately she was big for her age before starting the meds.

Also, allergy testing might help--not for shots, but so you'd know what to avoid.

Is your DD in daycare or preschool?

I am thinking about getting a peak flow monitor, even though DD is not yet 4. Gingerstar, do you think a 4yo who follows directions well could do it? Remember, she does sinus rinses. She's a trooper.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#111 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 02:56 PM
 
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Absolutely - it is a matter of taking a deep breath, then blowing it all out at once, a sharp WHOOOOOF! into the tube. The most important part is consistency, so you know that the trends you see are true. Generally, the child does three in a row, and you note the best one. To start, we actually charted twice daily. Then we just started noting her best # of the day on the calendar, so we could note trends. For instance, when my DD was in swimming lessons, her # that night was always noticeably higher, which reinforced our thought that it was beneficial. And if they are trending even gradually down, you can look at possible causes - is she fighting off a cold, even w/o obvious symptoms yet? are allergies getting bad? or for my DD, who has always been off the chart for ht/wt, she needed to have her Singulair dose increased - that made a big difference.
*can I just rant for a minute? What are they thinking, dosing by age?? 99% of meds are wt based, and they have to do this by age? ARrrrrgggh! ok...*

Also, we did see mild growth retardation w/Pulmicort, but she is now catching up, and like your DD, my DD was always tall, so now she is tallish average, which I think is fine. Also, there was a long-term study done with Pulmicort which showed that children who began before age 10 had some growth delay, but that they caught up with the control group after age 12. Children who began after age 10 had no delay....let me see if I can find it.

ok, can't find the one I wanted, but here is a pretty good article on WebMD

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#112 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 06:23 PM
 
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Maybe I'll just buy a cheap peak flow meter myself and see how she does. I hink I've seen them sold without an RX on allergy product sites, maybe. Is the main reason they say "not till 5" just because they think kids under 5 can't be trusted to blow their hardest?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#113 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 11:36 PM
 
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You know, I never heard a satisfactory explanation for the "wait til 5" approach.
But certainly, your DD sounds like one who might be ready - I know my DD was, and it is a wonderful tool.

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#114 of 156 Old 11-07-2007, 11:48 PM
 
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sorry, chiming in late... ds and dd both use a nebulizer, but they are both asmathics. but just for a cold, i don't think i would..

Kristin- Wife to J, Mommy to B (11), M-S (8), and little J (4) and J&J (7 months)
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#115 of 156 Old 11-08-2007, 12:30 AM
 
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I think we'll get a peak flow meter, too - every site has it as a reference for seeing if the kid is getting better or not. :

Have we located a tribe yet? Bumped an old one or created a new one?

Mama to H (6) B (3) : A (1)
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#116 of 156 Old 11-09-2007, 10:01 AM
 
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Hi - didn't have time to read all of the pp, but wanted to say that I have used plain old saline solution (without meds) in the nebulizer for my son with good results. I took him to the ER last year when he had croup. By the time we got there and he was actually seen, of course, the croup had gotten much better. As I recall, he did get a steroid shot, but the dr. said in the future, try the saline solution in the nebulizer first. (He gave us some individually sealed packets of saline solution).

My ds also had RSV at 4 months old and it seemed like all colds went straight to his lungs for a while. He was also advised to take Xoponex when he was wheezing. Like you, I hated to give him this and really tried to focus on prevention - this was tough, since he went to daycare two days a week (germ cesspool!) However, last winter he really didn't get sick much at all, besides that episode of croup in the fall. I think this was a combination of already having been exposed to a lot (and having built up immunities) and supplements. Do you supplement with vitamin C? I am also a fan of Sambucol for children and Buried Treasure Children's ACF at the first sign of a cold, both of which should be available at your local health food store. Also, plenty of rest, fruits, vegetables, etc. Good luck!
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#117 of 156 Old 11-13-2007, 04:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been meaning to write in for ages to say, Yes, let's start a tribe! But I don't know how -- anyone wanna tell me and i'll do it? As long as it will send me e-mails when someone writes, otherwise I'll never remember to check on it unless I'm having some problem myself.

Meanwhile -- I've been doing the daily pulmicort at .25 dose, approved by my ped but not yet by an asthma specialist -- though this was what an allergist told me to do last year (he doesn't have allergies, we found out then).

I've been doing it after he falls asleep at night -- this is always my preferred mode of administering the neb, as he doesn't notice it and i can get it right in. I was going to recommend this method to everyone. I also like the idea that he doesn't know about it and doesn't perceive of himself as sick.

BUT is it possible that this is causing either swollen adenoids and/or restlessness at night? Anyone experiencing this?

Last 3-4 nights -- he has gone back to having what sounds like clogged adenoids, which is what brought us to the ENT doctor in the first place last year -- sleep-disturbing snoring which keeps us all up all night as he endlessly wakes himself up and is weepy and weird. He had it since he was 3 mos and has RSV, and this all led also to the asthma. ENT told us singulaire and nasonex, and this really helped, he only got bad asthma once after we started, then we stopped for the summer. We were not doing daily neb at that time. My ped told us to not do the nasonex now, just the pulmicort, to see if this would stop the asthma. I was relieved, as he goes crazy, screaming and sobbing now, when we try the nasonex (last year he wasn't like that about it).

We have been on a trip last four days, and my mother said she got a cold (we just left her house), so maybe it's just coincidence and he's fighting a cold and not getting asthma because of the daily neb? Or could it be the pulmicort?
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#118 of 156 Old 11-13-2007, 03:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evie P. View Post

We have been on a trip last four days, and my mother said she got a cold (we just left her house), so maybe it's just coincidence and he's fighting a cold and not getting asthma because of the daily neb? Or could it be the pulmicort?
I'd say a cold, its best to do the pulmocort while sleeping unless your using a mask because long term it can cause cataracts if it gets in the eyes.

Seriously?
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#119 of 156 Old 11-13-2007, 06:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerstar View Post
zmom,
a pulmonologist is a lung specialist.
Pulmicort is a preventative steroid treatment which is given once or twice daily every day to prevent asthma symptoms. For younger children it is given in the neb as a liquid. It is available in a puffer, but since you just give it at set times it should be ok - we did 7 am, and 7 pm when we needed twice a day - high allergy times, or when she was coming down with something.

My DD was dx with allergies at 10 months, and we did see an allergist (once she was older) to determine just what she was allergic to (cats and hamsters but not dogs or horses, pollen but not mold, etc) so we could help her avoid them, but we declined to do shots. It was very helpful for us to get that information, and the testing was not really that hard for her.

The thing I feel has been most helpful for me is a peak flow monitor - it is a small device one blows into, and the reading indicates how well the airways are working. By tracking the numbers, you can see when they are starting to have trouble, sometimes days in advance of an attack, and you can change your treatment accordingly. My first ped said my DD was too young for one at age 5, but when we switched MDs that was the first thing they gave us, and she did it just fine. If you don't have one, talk to your doc, since it does require a prescription as a medical device. They range in cost, about $12 or so on up to about $50, but the cheap ones work fine. Ins may or may not cover it.
HTH
Sorry... been away dealing with the stomach flu.

These are great suggestions which I'll look into. Do I understand that the Pulmicort is used daily, long term?

I think the peak flow meter would be good for DD too. She's almost figured out how to do the puffer without the tube so I think she'd be able to do it at least most of the time.

Yes, Loraxc, DD is in daycare - but only 2 days a week. Seems to be 2 enough days for her to catch everything the wind blows in.

I'm still undecided on the allergy testing. The area we live in has an extremely high pollen count - which I'm sure she's allergic to - and we don't have any indoor pets. I'm pretty sure she's allergic to dust, mites, and mold so what more can they really tell me? We do our best to keep the house clean and I can't not let her go outside... (Maybe it's just my traumatic memories of the testing that's stopping me!)

Anyway, we have the rest of November off from daycare and most of December so let's hope it's a couple of healthy months!

Unschooling mama to one 5 year old DD.
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#120 of 156 Old 11-13-2007, 07:36 PM
 
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Apparently, Isaac's asthma is now considered "controlled"- he hasn't needed his blue inhaler in a month Here's passing dilated bronchiole dust to everyone else who needs it.
I started a tribe thread HERE, btw.

zmom, be careful about preventer meds without a spacer: even for adults, it's not commonly recommended because of the issue of oral thrush. Monitoring her peak flow readings and the frequency of reliever medication would help you figure out what she's allergic to (at least, in general terms. Trees/mould/grass, that kind of thing.)

Helen mum to five and mistress of mess and mayhem, making merry and mischief til the sun goes down.
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