Saying No to Nebulizer for Toddlers? - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

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#121 of 156 Old 11-16-2007, 07:22 PM
 
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zmom, be careful about preventer meds without a spacer: even for adults, it's not commonly recommended because of the issue of oral thrush. Monitoring her peak flow readings and the frequency of reliever medication would help you figure out what she's allergic to (at least, in general terms. Trees/mould/grass, that kind of thing.)
Really?! So that's possible with the albuterol? Or just with the pulmicort? Because we aren't on the pulmicort at this point...

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#122 of 156 Old 08-12-2008, 04:06 AM
 
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I wrote a long detailed history with specific questions and lost the post somehow... ugh. long day. anyway, boiled down, the questions were:

4 year old. past three months a bout of what appears to be viral induced asthma (begins with a runny nose, sneezing then progresses to constant painful coughing, sucking air, indented divits, rapid shallow breaths etc). finally got on nebulizer with levalbuteral and pulmicort. tonight he seems to be breathing a little better. miracle. so what do we do now...? give him pulmicort EVERY DAY??? and levalbuteral when he gets an attack? Are we supposed to give him Pulmicort EVERY TIME he gets a runny nose??? How do we stave off these episodes without constant medication???? Please help. We know so little about all this and cant understand why it came on so suddenly. Only a few chest colds in the first three years and then suddenly these horrible attacks every two weeks....
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#123 of 156 Old 08-12-2008, 04:11 AM
 
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What are spacers? we went to an allergist who listened to out sons back for five seconds, said, "hes wheezing- its an asthmatic reaction" and wrote us a prescription and told us to buy a nebulizer. The diagnosis is so unclear it seems- though reading these posts make sit sound a lot like viral induced asthma- and the treatment and long term plan is even less clear.

How can you best avoid episodes during which it is hard for the child to breath AND not have him on constant meds? And what would those meds be anyway? We dont even know if we are meant to keep him on pulmicort or not or for how long or when to start....
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#124 of 156 Old 08-12-2008, 06:13 AM
 
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Spacers are metal or plastic add-ons that have a holding chamber for the meds. The steps in using an inhaler are such that some people and young children can't do it right without the spacer.

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#125 of 156 Old 08-12-2008, 09:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What are spacers? we went to an allergist who listened to out sons back for five seconds, said, "hes wheezing- its an asthmatic reaction" and wrote us a prescription and told us to buy a nebulizer. The diagnosis is so unclear it seems- though reading these posts make sit sound a lot like viral induced asthma- and the treatment and long term plan is even less clear.

How can you best avoid episodes during which it is hard for the child to breath AND not have him on constant meds? And what would those meds be anyway? We dont even know if we are meant to keep him on pulmicort or not or for how long or when to start....
It was the mamas on this thread who made me realize that if your child really has asthma, you have to completely shift your thinking. I resisted the daily pulmicort for a year because it was so against my usual no-med way, but these ladies made me realize that it is not okay for a child to be so sick so often, and that the daily pulmicort would be far less injurious to his system than having to take oral steroids and than having to be so violently ill so often.

So we did pulmicort all last winter and it helped a lot. he was sick a lot less often. You have to do it every day for it to work. I do it when he is sleeping and just hold the mask by his face.

Now we are doing homeopathy for the summer, while we are off the pulmicort (you go off for the summer if viral induced usually), and I think it is working at least somewhat because it is the longest he has ever gone without getting asthma -- last summer he was sick a couple of times but this summer not at all. I would look for a really good homeopath if you can and do that, as it seems to at least mitigate the frequency -- we'll see in the fall if it is helping as much once the virus season is here, but certainly it has helped this summer. We went to a couple quacks first, so you just have to really find a good homeopath. If he gets asthma again once the virus season starts, we will go back to the daily pulmicort.

Good luck!
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#126 of 156 Old 08-21-2008, 01:20 AM
 
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What a great thread. Its taken me a long, long time and about 4 ER trips to accept my son's asthma and all the meds that goes with it. For awhile, I didn't event connect the word ASTHMA to what was going on. It was just a really bad cold that affected his breathing. Then is was the "weird zone" where nothing could be explained. DS said he had a "laughing problem," was SOOOO cranky - for like 2 years. : ( A trip to a pulmonologist turned up little except a suggestion of a psych evaluation. Diet changes, chiropractors, NAET treatments and finally after the last ER visit a diagnosis of asthma and a wake up call for mama.

I'm still trying to understand his triggers. We've been "managing" it for the past 6 months using Albuterol and Flovent. Its not under control - we are dealing with a flare up right now and he is on an oral steroid (left over from the last ER visit - if I hadn't had that last night we would have been back in ER). I need to now start understanding DAILY meds. Ugh. I actually avoided a lot of threads here on MDC that had all these med terms peppered in it (singulair, flovent, pulmicort -noooo! That is not us!).

Its nice to have a group of other natural-minded mamas that have kids on meds to talk with.

I could not find a tribe, though. Anyone have a link?
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#127 of 156 Old 08-21-2008, 01:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mommy&Will View Post
What a great thread. Its taken me a long, long time and about 4 ER trips to accept my son's asthma and all the meds that goes with it. For awhile, I didn't event connect the word ASTHMA to what was going on. It was just a really bad cold that affected his breathing. Then is was the "weird zone" where nothing could be explained. DS said he had a "laughing problem," was SOOOO cranky - for like 2 years. : ( A trip to a pulmonologist turned up little except a suggestion of a psych evaluation. Diet changes, chiropractors, NAET treatments and finally after the last ER visit a diagnosis of asthma and a wake up call for mama.

I'm still trying to understand his triggers. We've been "managing" it for the past 6 months using Albuterol and Flovent. Its not under control - we are dealing with a flare up right now and he is on an oral steroid (left over from the last ER visit - if I hadn't had that last night we would have been back in ER). I need to now start understanding DAILY meds. Ugh. I actually avoided a lot of threads here on MDC that had all these med terms peppered in it (singulair, flovent, pulmicort -noooo! That is not us!).

Its nice to have a group of other natural-minded mamas that have kids on meds to talk with.

I could not find a tribe, though. Anyone have a link?
yep, drugs like Flovent need to be taken DAILY. It sucks I know, my 8 yr old started public school today and even though she only has viral induced asthma now were seeing the pulmo Monday to start her back on inhaled steroids to term and prevent all heck breaking lose when she starts getting sick this year and my 2 yr old will be starting them as well. btw, I cleaned out my pm box as I saw you tried sending one

Seriously?
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#128 of 156 Old 08-21-2008, 09:51 AM
 
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I can't remember if I posted it to this thread but when my DD was dx'd the site that helped me the most, much more than the doctors, was the Asthma Wizard site from the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, which is the leader in lung disease.

It does get better. As children grow and their lungs and airways grow, it does improve.

s

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#129 of 156 Old 08-25-2008, 02:38 PM
 
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I guess there's a lot of difference of opinion on this? My son (20 months) has asthma, so far, only induced by respiratory viruses. He's had two episodes so far. After the second one, his pediatrician wanted him on daily Flovent, but an asthma specialist we saw disagreed and said he should only take it at the onset of of a cold or coughing. It's all so confusing, and I find the disagreements very upsetting when we're talking about things like my son's quality of life.
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#130 of 156 Old 08-25-2008, 02:59 PM
 
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I should add that the most recent research on the intermittent viral-induced type of asthma my son has does suggest that daily treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid does NOT help in preventing episodes of asthma, or in making it more likely for the kids to do any better in the long run -- contrary to the conventional wisdom. That's why the asthma specialist we saw recommended to use the Flovent only at the first sign of a cold. I had a really good link on this, but can't find it again. Here's a short summary, though:

http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/asth...asthma.htm#rev

(Note that this doesn't apply to asthma that shows up regularly/irregularly without a viral trigger -- preventive medicine is effective in reducing symptoms in that case.)
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#131 of 156 Old 08-26-2008, 03:02 AM
 
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My personal call, as I sit here with a not life-threatening viral-induced patch of asthma, feeling like I'm gasping for breath every single time, and wanting to cry because of it, and having real difficulty stopping coughing, and not looking AT ALL like I'm as distressed as I am, is give him the drugs!!!

Seriously, it's a horrendous horrendous feeling, and my breathing is not really any faster than normal. If I were non-verbal no-one would know how horrible it feels.
I completely agree with this. The nebulizer likely saved my life a few times as a child. And it's true that you might not be able to tell when someone is having difficulty breathing. I've had asthma attacks sitting in class and no one has noticed (thank the gods for Albuterol too). Asthma is a serious thing and can overtake a person pretty freakin quickly (within seconds).
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#132 of 156 Old 08-26-2008, 11:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I should add that the most recent research on the intermittent viral-induced type of asthma my son has does suggest that daily treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid does NOT help in preventing episodes of asthma, or in making it more likely for the kids to do any better in the long run -- contrary to the conventional wisdom. That's why the asthma specialist we saw recommended to use the Flovent only at the first sign of a cold. I had a really good link on this, but can't find it again. Here's a short summary, though:

http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/asth...asthma.htm#rev

(Note that this doesn't apply to asthma that shows up regularly/irregularly without a viral trigger -- preventive medicine is effective in reducing symptoms in that case.)
First of all -- can anyone tell me what LTRA is?

Second -- This article is very interesting to read because I have had my doubts about Pulmicort -- last year we started daily Pulmicort (one dose) and it was a miracle for 8 weeks but then we spiraled into worst episodes yet for Feb-May and specialist wants us to do 2 doses per day this fall. We started homeopathy and I see serious results (the guy also cured my h'rhoids!) but of course virus season hasn't started yet. (But last summer he got sick at least once a month and this summer not at all.) Anyway I was just very disheartened about the pulmicort and this study seems to suggest it is kind of pointless for viral-induced? Or am I not understanding it correctly?
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#133 of 156 Old 10-19-2008, 02:49 PM
 
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My son is 2 and has a similar history (viral induced asthma, etc). He has been on pulmicort with a nebulizer, and it helped but not enough so he was recently put on Flovent, with the air chamber/spacer because they thought he was getting more of the medication in the spacer than the nebulizer. We have had a lot of trouble getting him to use the mask. It was MUCH easier to give him. However, he developed a terrible diaper rash (really just on his penis). After numerous trips to the ped and then to a dermatologist, we were told that it is eczema on his penis. The derm kept putting him on a stronger and stronger meds that didn't seem to be working my husband and I realized that it might be because of the flovent (the timing seemed to line up). We took him off of flovent wed, and it has improved drastically (still healing a bit).

Has anyone had a similar situation? What options do we have now?

thanks for any ideas.

Tara
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#134 of 156 Old 10-19-2008, 07:01 PM
 
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As a person with Asthma, I would medicate my kid at the first sign of distress. It is a horrible feeling to not be able to breath clearly.

Vanessa belly.gif, wife to Kev , mama to Byron (5) wild.gif and Billie (2) and  due in June
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#135 of 156 Old 10-19-2008, 07:39 PM
 
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My son is 2 and has a similar history (viral induced asthma, etc). He has been on pulmicort with a nebulizer, and it helped but not enough so he was recently put on Flovent, with the air chamber/spacer because they thought he was getting more of the medication in the spacer than the nebulizer. We have had a lot of trouble getting him to use the mask. It was MUCH easier to give him. However, he developed a terrible diaper rash (really just on his penis). After numerous trips to the ped and then to a dermatologist, we were told that it is eczema on his penis. The derm kept putting him on a stronger and stronger meds that didn't seem to be working my husband and I realized that it might be because of the flovent (the timing seemed to line up). We took him off of flovent wed, and it has improved drastically (still healing a bit).

Has anyone had a similar situation? What options do we have now?

thanks for any ideas.
Tara
No similar sit. here, but could it be yeast based? My thought is that oral thrush is a common problem with these steroids, that is why the instruction to rinse the mouth after use. Not sure how it could be linked, just wanted to throw that out there for you to discuss with the docs. Kinda sounds suspiciously like it must be linked somehow, IMO.... Hope you are able to eliminate it for the poor little guy!

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#136 of 156 Old 10-19-2008, 09:06 PM
 
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No similar sit. here, but could it be yeast based? My thought is that oral thrush is a common problem with these steroids, that is why the instruction to rinse the mouth after use. Not sure how it could be linked, just wanted to throw that out there for you to discuss with the docs. Kinda sounds suspiciously like it must be linked somehow, IMO.... Hope you are able to eliminate it for the poor little guy!
IDK, I've taken Oral Steroids for a decade and never had thrush until my DD got it from antibiotics and transferred it to my nipples. And DD doesn't take asthma meds as she is not (knock on wood) asthmatic.

But I think maybe everyone's susceptibility to yeast and rashes is different.

Also for any mommas thinking on skipping meds, for the love of your child nooooo. I have scarring in my lungs. Without inhaled steroids, I would be on disability. Yes, there are risks with treatment, but breathing is so much more important.

V

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#137 of 156 Old 10-19-2008, 10:42 PM
 
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My 3 y.o. daughter has asthma. She had RSV, was 2 months premature, and emergency problems meant I didn't get the steroids shots to help her lungs before she was born.

My daughter takes pulmicort 2x/day. She had her first asthma attack last May. I couldn't get her off albuterol every 4 hours, and we couldn't get her over the episode without oral steroids. The second month, she had another attack that landed her in the ER. Again, she needed oral steroids. I nearly took her back to the ER the same night and had to get her seen again the next two days.

I'm a newbie to asthma, but my research indicates that uncontrolled asthma is a badie you dont' want to avoid at all costs. Like a PP said, it causes permanent lung remodeling and damage. I don't want her on oral steroid bursts if possible. It took increasing her pulmicort dose to stop the attacks and stop having to give her oral steroids every month.

I am conservative with drugs. But I would consider daily nebulizers a way to avoid further more invasive treatment, unnecessary lung damage and life-style repercussions, and possible death. Nebulizers are your more conservative option. Steam showers for asthma? I think you're courting some serious, serious damage.
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#138 of 156 Old 10-20-2008, 08:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son is 2 and has a similar history (viral induced asthma, etc). He has been on pulmicort with a nebulizer, and it helped but not enough so he was recently put on Flovent, with the air chamber/spacer because they thought he was getting more of the medication in the spacer than the nebulizer. We have had a lot of trouble getting him to use the mask. It was MUCH easier to give him. However, he developed a terrible diaper rash (really just on his penis). After numerous trips to the ped and then to a dermatologist, we were told that it is eczema on his penis. The derm kept putting him on a stronger and stronger meds that didn't seem to be working my husband and I realized that it might be because of the flovent (the timing seemed to line up). We took him off of flovent wed, and it has improved drastically (still healing a bit).

Has anyone had a similar situation? What options do we have now?

thanks for any ideas.

Tara
First want to mention to the latest posters that you ladies have to read through the whole thread -- it's an unfolding story of revelation! By the end, the original poster, moi, realized that meds are the way. You'll also find answers to all the common questions about asthma in here, as well as links. Overall everyone agrees that you should find an asthma specialist you can really trust if your ped is not helping you develop a good action plan.

BUT I also realized that homeopathy is at least part of the way -- and our homeopath says that asthma and eczema are very closely related. If you supress one, the other one appears. When we started homeopathy, he got asthma much less but had eczema all of a sudden, so we treated that too and it went away.

Our homeopathy experience in a large nutshell -- I went to a bunch of quacks but finally found a good one and we had no asthma from Jun-Oct. Granted, it wasn't viral season, but last summer we had asthma almost once a month. We had our first asthma in Oct before I started any meds (I was hoping the homeopathy had changed our world entirely), now he is on meds and continuing homeopathy, and the attacks seem a little less severe now, I think because of the homeopathy but maybe because he is older also. I highly highly recommend to all you mamas to find a good homeopath, it seems to have helped us a lot. He is on four different remedies, and I really notice a change. Asthma not gone as some other mamas had found, but I am hopeful if we keep up with the remedy, it will be at least less severe -- it is already much less often.
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#139 of 156 Old 10-20-2008, 08:31 PM
 
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First want to mention to the latest posters that you ladies have to read through the whole thread -- it's an unfolding story of revelation! By the end, the original poster, moi, realized that meds are the way. You'll also find answers to all the common questions about asthma in here, as well as links. Overall everyone agrees that you should find an asthma specialist you can really trust if your ped is not helping you develop a good action plan.

BUT I also realized that homeopathy is at least part of the way -- and our homeopath says that asthma and eczema are very closely related. If you supress one, the other one appears. When we started homeopathy, he got asthma much less but had eczema all of a sudden, so we treated that too and it went away.

Our homeopathy experience in a large nutshell -- I went to a bunch of quacks but finally found a good one and we had no asthma from Jun-Oct. Granted, it wasn't viral season, but last summer we had asthma almost once a month. We had our first asthma in Oct before I started any meds (I was hoping the homeopathy had changed our world entirely), now he is on meds and continuing homeopathy, and the attacks seem a little less severe now, I think because of the homeopathy but maybe because he is older also. I highly highly recommend to all you mamas to find a good homeopath, it seems to have helped us a lot. He is on four different remedies, and I really notice a change. Asthma not gone as some other mamas had found, but I am hopeful if we keep up with the remedy, it will be at least less severe -- it is already much less often.
Evie, I'm glad you've worked through Asthma 101. As far as the asthma free period, be vigilant. It's way too soon to declare success. Asthma can change. It can ebb and flow, it can switch symptoms, so keep a very very sharp eye out.

I went 7 years without an episode. Ditched my pulmonologist and just used my PCP to keep up the meds. Then I went to Europe, was exposed to some new germs, missed 2 weeks of work and was damn near intubated. It was a sobering, sobering lesson to always be prepared.

V

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#140 of 156 Old 12-04-2008, 06:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello - Wanted to tap the asthma moms about this --

Because of my son's viral-induced asthma (that spawned this thread!) and because lately we wake up itchy and sneezy, I decided we should put dust mite covers on the pillows and comforters (they are down). But I just spoke with fellow at allergy buyers club and he said the likelihood of dust mites at this time of year in New York is kind of small and I should instead go with an air purifier.

He said his son was off the inhaler 6 weeks after they got the air purifier. But that I had to get the IQAir one, which is like 700 bucks.

I'm wondering if you asthma mamas have found air purifiers to help itchy skin as well as asthma, and if so, if it's necessary to buy the IQ Air one. And what about the mite covers?
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#141 of 156 Old 12-04-2008, 07:49 PM
 
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We have the regular General Electric hepa filters in our house. We actually have two now and run one in the boys bedroom and one in the playroom. It really really helped us. On top of that though we do frequent washing, freeze the pillows for 24 hours every couple of weeks to kill the mites... as well as frequent vacuming. I really think that the hepa filters worked well for us. We use a type that costs around 100$ -150$.
Is the one that he is trying to sell you a whole home one? How many square feet does it cover? Are the filters easily obtainable( and how often and how costly are they to replace?)... those would be the questions that I would be asking. A friend gave us a400$ machine that she was finished using but the filters cost 150 bucks and we can't afford to get them right now. It's square footage is higher though and would cover almost all of the house.

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#142 of 156 Old 12-05-2008, 10:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
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We have the regular General Electric hepa filters in our house. We actually have two now and run one in the boys bedroom and one in the playroom. It really really helped us. On top of that though we do frequent washing, freeze the pillows for 24 hours every couple of weeks to kill the mites... as well as frequent vacuming. I really think that the hepa filters worked well for us. We use a type that costs around 100$ -150$.
Is the one that he is trying to sell you a whole home one? How many square feet does it cover? Are the filters easily obtainable( and how often and how costly are they to replace?)... those would be the questions that I would be asking. A friend gave us a400$ machine that she was finished using but the filters cost 150 bucks and we can't afford to get them right now. It's square footage is higher though and would cover almost all of the house.
Thanks for your reply -- the guy at the allergy buyers club was telling me that only the IQ filter takes out certain allergens that none of the others do. He said the filters would cost me about $100 a year, but the unit itself is really expensive. I believe it covers 500 sq ft or a bit more but we live in a duplex apt, so we are just planning to use it in our bedroom area (upstairs) and maybe bring it down sometimes for living floor.

Can you possibly be a bit more specific about how it helped? Did it reduce the frequency of illness/asthma? Did it reduce the severity?
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#143 of 156 Old 12-06-2008, 02:31 AM
 
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Sorry I missed your question!

The hepa filters SEEMED to lower the whole allergen load which in turn appeared to help the boys immune systems. They got fewer colds because they werent already overloaded with allergies.... less hospital visits. My oldest guy tested very allergic to dust mites and he also has really awful hayfever. If we neglect turning the fliter on for a day or two he gets sneezing attacks( even worse during hayfever season. His room with the filter on and windows shut is the only place that he finds comfort during certain pollen dense months). He sneezes a dozen times at a time rapid fire. I think that the filter worked really well with other allergy reducinig techniques. I would use your gut on this one. I know that my cheapo filter didn't do anything extra fancy and it still helped. Even though it helps I wouldn't go out now and buy an even better one.
We did luck out on a top of the line vacume though with a hepa filter. A good vacume helps too. We got one that was practically brand new from a couple that was moving out of the country for a very low price. They can be super expensive too though.
Do you still have pets? Carpets? Do you live in the city? How is the air quality otherwise?

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#144 of 156 Old 12-06-2008, 02:53 AM
 
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DD is 16 mos. and has viral induced asthma. She has never had issues badly with it enough to have to use a nebulizer. I do have an albuterol inhaler for her when she starts to wheeze or cough chronically, but we rarely have to use it. For right now she is seeing an asthma/allergy specialist twice a year who is in agreement with the pediatrician who put her on the albuterol in the first place. So far it is all I've had to use but the asthma specialist did say she would recommend Singulair if DD's asthma worsened. Have you thought about getting an air filter for the room where your LO sleeps it may help?
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#145 of 156 Old 12-06-2008, 11:40 PM
 
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My 8yo son has severe asthma. He has been miserable all week. We took a trip to the er at 2am Wednesday and he's been out of school all week. He was diagnosed with broncitis. He does Abuterol through the nebulizer when he is struggling and Pulmicort everyday when he is doing well. Per our allergist we get him a flu shot every year to try an prevent the worst. Do your children get flu shots?
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#146 of 156 Old 12-07-2008, 12:17 AM
 
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I'm going to come back to this thread and reply to a lot but wanted to throw in something pretty quickly. I have two kids with RAD and we sometimes use the nebulizer with plain saline and that helps a lot more than the showers do at times. I've also found that my kids never tend to completely heal until we do the pulmicort. If I didn't have a nebulizer at home, we'd be spending a lot of time at the hospital. As someone with asthma myself since I was a baby (I'm now 28 or 29... don't remember!), seeing my kids struggle for breath is very scary. I try to remember a few basic things that usually stops me from running out to the er at 2am.

1. color
2. abdominal retraction
3. hydration
4. moisture
5. it's always worse at night

Sometimes, if we can just keep the kids eating popsicles in a moist/warm atmosphere and hang on through the night, they get much better. I also have a stethescope at home which just brings me a little more peace of mind. We have a treatment step-plan that does include albuterol, pulmicort or xopenx when needed.

No flu shots. EVER.

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#147 of 156 Old 12-07-2008, 12:42 AM
 
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Warning, I am evangelical about Classical Homeopathy.

There are many alternatives to enhancing your child's health and asthma status. We use classical homeopathy and this has basically cured my husband's asthma. Dh was on Benedryl and Proventil every four hours and Claritin and Advair daily, due to allergy induced asthma. He is highly allergic to all air borne pollen: all tree, grass, weed, mold, dust, mites, cat dander pollen, etc. He couldn't be outside for about 6-9 months of the year due to red, runny eyes, sneezing and wheezing and debilitating asthma.

Eliminating these allergens is important, especially in the bedroom. Obviously, some of them can't be eliminated and he would have significant asthma issues each spring and fall. However, since being on classical homeopathic remedy for five years he hasn't had any asthma in over four years. None. And he no longer takes the Benedryl or Proventil (albuterol). Now he never has these issues and only uses Claritin sporadically and the Advair daily. And no more asthma!

We use large doses of vitamin C and Sambucol (for Kids or Adults) which has echinacea (some asthmatics have problems with echinacea). Hydration and humidification (with an aseptically clean humidifier) help to decrease mucus production during colds/flus. A key issue is to identify any dairy or soy allergies and eliminate them. Because these allergens combine to cause severe mucus production when the immune system is under assault of colds/flus.

You might request a prescription for nebulizer treatments, for as needed use, at home with either saline or albuterol. Then you can keep ahead of the asthma issues so that emergency room visits are less likely to develop. I don't agree that they cause "rebound swelling". You can get that with steroids, however. Albuterol brochodilates, it opens the airways. The spasmadic coughing can cause irritation, swelling, and mucus production to lubricate the irritated airways. I'd always error on the side of MORE albuterol, avoid steroids. Albuterol is a transient drug, compared to the systemic effect of steroids. Although, many folks do not find as effective of therapy from the inhaler, as compared to the nebulizer. I'd embrace using the nebulizer proactively to PREVENT the irritated, swollen, secretion filled airways.

I have not researched NAET or TAT; but I have heard that they have also been found to help allergies and subsequent asthma.

We don't vaccinate. We support our immune systems, rather than artificially assault them. Originally, I might add, the vaccines were tested on healthy adults and subsequent small studies on healthy children. I don't know the actual number of asthmatic children that the vaccines have been experimented on. Most conclusions about safety and efficacy for compromised patient populations are extrapolated from "post marketing research". Which means our children.

You might try the new nasal wash X-clear. It only has water, xylitol, saline and grapefruit seed extract. The xylitol is a natural antibacterial, and the grapefruit seed extract is a natural anti-inflammatory.

I assume that you are keeping the windows and door to the bedroom closed to keep out allergens and consider a HEPA air filter. And no stuffed animals except for a bedtime lovey which is washed frequently. Eucalyptus helps to open the nasal passages too. Vit. C decreases runny noses, in large doses.


1. Decrease allergens, especially food allergens. (dairy, soy, wheat, eggs and citrus are the most common)

2. Keep bedroom allergen free with HEPA filter. (no pets, limited stuffed animals, door closed at all times, plastic cover on mattress, vacuum daily)

3. Vitamin C mega doses (I can't proscribe, of course) I give ds 1000mg, 3x day with first sniffles.

4. Sambucol for Kids (intensive dose, tsp 4x/da) caution with asthmatics some are allergic to echinacea.

5. Consider classical homeopathy, NAET, TAT as alternative therapies. Investigate now. (Homeopathy cured my husband and friend's asthma and resolved many of our son's food intolerances.)

6. Avoid steroids like the plague.

7. (We are a totally non-vaccinating family, thumbs down to flu shots)

8. Humidifier in his room for sniffles, scrupulously clean. Clean daily with vinegar.

9. Avoid antibiotics like the plague.

10. Avoid benedryl-dries mucus membranes

11. Avoid allergy shots

12. Consider saline nebulization instead of albuterol for loosening secretions, requires physician order. Doesn't cause the jittery feeling and doesn't taste as bad. This is the first line hydration that I'd recommend.

13. Consider steroid inhaler for prophalaxis, year round (medical model)

14. Adding coconut oil, cod liver oil, magnesium, probiotics, vit C, zinc. The probiotics to focus on for a baby are bifidum bacteria. These are important for healing the gut, which is 70% of the immune system.

Oh, and dh was severely allergic to cats, we only had one outdoor cat; and now we have 5 cats which sleep on our bed!

AND, my friend was on serious drugs for migraines for years, until classical homeopathy. And another friend's daughter was scheduled for tubes to be inserted in her ears until classical homeopathy finally cured what 5 rounds of antibiotics couldn't. She was just 8 months old.

We have always just purchased a top of the line HEPA air cleaner from Sears. That way we know they'll have the filters available long term. We have two of these:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...d=air+cleaners

And we bought this vacuum cleaner. It is rated as a "best buy" by Consumer Reports. It has a HEPA filter built in:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...re+progressive

And for a mattress cover, we bought what they have at Walmart. It is sorta paper-cloth and keeps mites out. Get them for the pillows also. They are washable.


HTH, Pat

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#148 of 156 Old 12-07-2008, 12:50 AM
 
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Fantastic advice... all in one post! That was pretty much the path we took as well!

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#149 of 156 Old 12-07-2008, 01:13 AM
 
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In the past year, Merck & Company, Inc. has updated the patient information for Singulair to include these postmarketing adverse events: tremor, depression, suicidal thinking and behavior (including suicide), and anxiousness.
http://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/early_comm/montelukast.htm


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#150 of 156 Old 12-07-2008, 11:15 PM
 
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moved.
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