Saying No to Nebulizer for Toddlers? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Despite that sticky, toddlers seems like right forum but feel free to move if I'm wrong --

In last two weeks, I've had advice from two very different people from very different backgrounds about using a nebulizer on a toddler or baby who has viral-induced asthma. They say it is better to wait it out, using lots of steam showers and using vaporizer, etc. And it really jives with what I've been feeing about how bad those medications are for a toddler, but I am scared to follow this advice since we're talking about breathing. I'd like to hear from you on this!

The idea is that, unless the child is really in distress asthma-wise, it's better to hold off from the nebulizer. Apparently with small kids, it can cause rebound effect, where the swelling comes back much worse as nebulizer starts to wear off. And there are other problems as well, but I am not too clear on the specifics as I have not yet done much reading on it.

Our guy is sick about twice a month, and it goes straight to the chest. (He had RSV at 3 months, and this kind of sickness-getting seems to have happened ever since. He's now 28 mos. but has never had a real fever, i think cause I still nurse.) He has never had a very severe asthma attack but usually gets horrible chest cold and some wheezing and has to be held in chair all night to sleep, etc. His breathing is rapid when this happens but not gasping. We keep switching docs, and we do like our current one, but they advise using the pulmicort and xopenex at FIRST SIGN of a cough or runny nose. Then if the cough and rapid breathing doesn't go away in a couple days, they put him on orapred (steroid). With all these medications, he goes quite crazy and I feel that they cause a whole other problem with his mood and behavior which makes it harder for him to heal. I have a sneaky feeling that the awful sicknesses would last the same amount of time and be about the same amount of severity with or without all these horrible drugs. In some ways I start to think that the drugs even increase the severity of the sickness in between doses, and the rebound idea fits with that.

He does not have allergies -- we had him tested.

Singulaire and/or Nasonex seems to help a little in terms of reducing severity of each illness. But here too I hate idea of giving this tiny kid a drug or two every single day!!

What do you think?
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#2 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:35 PM
 
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Hmmm, I won't be much help wrt the asthma q's, but I do have to medicate my boy with several different meds/day. It blows, so I'm sending you a

Hope you get answers soon!
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#3 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hmmm, I won't be much help wrt the asthma q's, but I do have to medicate my boy with several different meds/day. It blows, so I'm sending you a

Hope you get answers soon!
Oh you sweet thing! I am so sorry for your boy to have to have that! it is so hard! I started using little gifts to get him to take the medication because I was sick of doing CIO-equivalent in forcing him to take medication, but I guess this wouldn't work if you had to do 365 gifts a year. Good luck to you!
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#4 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:40 PM
 
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My ds also had RSV and was hospitalized for it when he was 23 months. Now whenever he gets a cold it goes straight to his chest. I find that if we use the nebulizer right away then we avoid steroids all together. This is very important to me because steroids are a very harmful medication and he doesn't sleep and acts crazy when he is on them.
I haven't heard many negatives about using a nebulizer, however I haven't really reseached it too well either. I just know I want to avoid steroids as much as possible.
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#5 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:44 PM
 
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Untreated asthma can be a very dangerous thing. Both in the short term, as it's a significant cause of death in young children, and in the long term as it can cause a child's airways to "remodel" and basically become deformed/damaged. My 8 year old has permanent lung damage because we weren't able to get control of his reactive airway problems when he was younger (his were caused by reflux and aspiration and were quite severe).

I know how scary asthma meds can be -- we've had significant side effects (growth suppression, hyperactivity) but I think it's important to keep in mind that the other option (leaving it untreated) can be worse.

One more thought -- according to my doctor, the side effects from one short round of Orapred or another oral steroid are equal or worse than the side effects of many months of daily use of an inhaled steroid like Pulmicort. I can definitely vouch for that being true from my point of view. So, if he's getting to the point where he's needing Orapred on anything like a routine basis (more than once or twice a year) then putting him on something daily that's less potent is a good idea.

Sorry to be so scary.
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#6 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:50 PM
 
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Sounds exactly like my boys. The good news is that H is seeming to outgrow it as he gets bigger and his airways grow. He's almost 4 and we haven't had to use the neb for him in months. Ben, OTOH, has needed it almost constantly the last month, and before that, sporadically every few months (for a few weeks at a time). Henry was exactly the same way as Ben at that age, so I really believe that B will outgrow needing it as often as he does now.

As for the steroids, I found that - and this is contrary to the directions, so I am certainly NOT advocating for it - that we gave him a 1/4 tsp vs. 1 full tsp. ONCE a day (vs. 2 times a day - 2 tsp a day!) after our bout of giving the full amount and ending up with a feral child who slept 30 minutes a night. The 1/4 tsp got him better in days, and to counteract the misery that he had last time (he was able to verbalize how miserable he was with the jitters and constant motion needs brought on by the steroids), and to help with the congestion, we also dosed with him Benadryl every in the morning and then again at bedtime.

So, personal experience - I give the neb when he gets chesty, and I keep it up for 3 treatments a day until he's better, and after 3 days of no improvement on the neb, I give him 1/4 t (this is my 39 lb preschooler) of the steroid for ~3-4 days (he's never taken longer than that to get better).

Mama to H (6) B (3) : A (1)
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#7 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:50 PM
 
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I use the nebulizer on DS, I've never had a problem with the rebound effect.
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#8 of 156 Old 10-09-2007, 10:59 PM
 
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My sister has a 100% naturally birthed, ebf, unvax'd 28 mos old who has chest issues in winter. She does the saline alone in the neb and it works great! The neb (with or without the med part) can be a really rocking tool. Whatever avoids the antbx, as we say here in our family. Every person has an Achilles heel. I would decide ont he course of treatment with the help of a trusted health care provider. I think finding that trsuted person is one of the most important things you can do for your family.
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#9 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 02:34 AM
 
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My personal call, as I sit here with a not life-threatening viral-induced patch of asthma, feeling like I'm gasping for breath every single time, and wanting to cry because of it, and having real difficulty stopping coughing, and not looking AT ALL like I'm as distressed as I am, is give him the drugs!!!

Seriously, it's a horrendous horrendous feeling, and my breathing is not really any faster than normal. If I were non-verbal no-one would know how horrible it feels.
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#10 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 02:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Momily View Post
Untreated asthma can be a very dangerous thing. Both in the short term, as it's a significant cause of death in young children, and in the long term as it can cause a child's airways to "remodel" and basically become deformed/damaged. My 8 year old has permanent lung damage because we weren't able to get control of his reactive airway problems when he was younger (his were caused by reflux and aspiration and were quite severe).

I know how scary asthma meds can be -- we've had significant side effects (growth suppression, hyperactivity) but I think it's important to keep in mind that the other option (leaving it untreated) can be worse.
:
One more thought -- according to my doctor, the side effects from one short round of Orapred or another oral steroid are equal or worse than the side effects of many months of daily use of an inhaled steroid like Pulmicort. I can definitely vouch for that being true from my point of view. So, if he's getting to the point where he's needing Orapred on anything like a routine basis (more than once or twice a year) then putting him on something daily that's less potent is a good idea.

Sorry to be so scary.


:

Seriously?
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#11 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 02:55 AM
 
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Idon't know anything about the meds you LO is on, or his condition. I can not tell you anything medical. However, I can tell from your post that you are not happy with his current treatment plan, and that you mommy instincts are telling you to look into it. I strongly believe in listening to your instincts, and they are telling you that you need to do something different.

My very simple advice is ask to be refered to a specialist.

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#12 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 10:07 AM
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No no no!

Do NOT hold off on a nebulizer treatment!

As a severe asthmatic and a former paramedic I can tell you that is absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

Kids crash FAST, much faster than adults. They can be fine, fine, fine, fine, DEAD. If you don't get that nebulizer going while they are still breathing well enough to inhale the medication, VERY ugly things can happen.
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#13 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 10:49 AM
 
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My personal call, as I sit here with a not life-threatening viral-induced patch of asthma, feeling like I'm gasping for breath every single time, and wanting to cry because of it, and having real difficulty stopping coughing, and not looking AT ALL like I'm as distressed as I am, is give him the drugs!!!

Seriously, it's a horrendous horrendous feeling, and my breathing is not really any faster than normal. If I were non-verbal no-one would know how horrible it feels.
:

When I have an asthma attack, nobody but my dad who is an ashtmatic and my Smom who lived with my dad for 15years, could tell whats going on. I feel much worse than I look.
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#14 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 10:53 AM
 
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No no no!

Do NOT hold off on a nebulizer treatment!

As a severe asthmatic and a former paramedic I can tell you that is absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

Kids crash FAST, much faster than adults. They can be fine, fine, fine, fine, DEAD. If you don't get that nebulizer going while they are still breathing well enough to inhale the medication, VERY ugly things can happen.
I can tell you that we once parted the waters in the ER with an 18 mos old (now 13) who was having difficulty breathing due to a chest cold. He was fine-- i didn't even realize he had more than a cold, and then he started with labored breathing. I scooped him up and walked to the hospital (that was around the corner from my home). The waiting room was packed, and I didn't call ahead. Yet, the intake nurse and others at the reception desk took one look at him, and two people ran to open the door for us, and at the same time the intake person said "Come in, now!!". I never saw such a thing. One treatment later, he was toddling around, being charming. That shocked me.
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#15 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 12:21 PM
 
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Evie P. -

My DD (3) has asthma that mostly manifests itself during a chest cold and/or allergy season. We started her on Singular at about 18 months after she was hospitalized for pneumonia which she developed as a result of a cold that went into her lungs (this was before we knew she had asthma). At that time, we also started her on Zyrtec for allergies. They also gave us an inhaler (why they didn't start us on a nebulizer, I'll never figure out) which didn't quite work with an 18 month old but then we transferred over to the nebulizer. (She has not been tested for allergies because my allergist told me that it isn't until age 3 that allergy tests are accurate but DP and I both have allergies and we live in one of the worst allergy locations in the US so it really wouldn't surprise me!)

At first, we were slow to give her the treatments and only gave them to her when she had been coughing for days. Now, the first time she coughs, she starts getting her breathing treatments. We're now coming down from 2 weeks of coughing (which lead to bronchitis - our second bronchitis in 2 months). Apparently, you can give the treatments every 3-4 hours instead of every 4-6 hours and that extra treatment seems to be making the difference. (Well, that and the antibiotics - of course, check with your doctor before you do this!)

Hmmm. I'm not making it sound like the nebulizer helps, am I? What I mean is that I have several instances where I'm absolutely positive that if we had NOT used the nebulizer, she'd have ended up back in the hospital with pneumonia.

Also, don't bother renting one from your insurance - we did that not knowing any better and spent almost $300 on a "rental" which they then wanted to sell us for another $150! We bought one on Amazon for $60 instead and it's a cute little penguin that Z says is "helping" her.

Anyway, I have no idea if any of my ramblings have helped and I know how hard it is to not want to use meds but to have a sick baby. I figure, if it keeps Z out of the hospital, I'll do the breathing treatments as much as I can!

Unschooling mama to one 5 year old DD.
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#16 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 12:48 PM
 
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OK. Firstly, you need to know that an asthma attack will scar the lungs and can make future attacks more intense. You also need to know that asthma kills.

There is a really hard adjustment process to accepting that your beautiful, perfect tiny person has a health condition that is potentially life-threatening- especially if, as in the case of my DS2 and your little darling, the majority of the time they're fine. If you want to talk more about it and vent on your journey through life with an asthmatic, I've btdt and I'm here to listen. A LOT of people will say that children should be left to it, that they'll come through it, use steam, etc. BUT:
Can you imagine how terrifying it must be to be unable to breathe and not to understand what's going on?

I, personally, would recommend singulaire- Isaac has been on it for 3 months now and finally, his asthma is under control (definition- reliever medication once a week or less.) I would not recommend the use of a nebuliser, but instead would suggest that you talk to his doctors about the use of a salbutamol inhaler with a spacer and mask. Not only is it more portable and less invasive than being hooked up to a machine for 10 minutes at a time, it's also less expensive. I know that the current fashion in the US is for nebulisers as a first line of treatment, but there are other options. You can also give smaller doses more easily with an inhaler and spacer- one dose of a neb equals ten puffs of an inhaler.
Looking at your management plan, I think you need some long-lasting drugs in there. A small child should not BE in crisis with their asthma twice a month. In particular, though, you need to get that salbutamol intake (through the neb) down as fast as possible if he's suffering hyperactivity symptoms, which means that you just HAVE to get on top of this and manage it properly. There is a balancing line in here between the use of steroids and reliever medication, and in your shoes I'd start asking for the steroids earlier to get the attack under control quicker. I'd also consider constitutional treatment from a homoeopath- this is NOT going to get better on its own any time soon.

You are going to get a hell of a lot of crap from people whose children had a mild dose of croup once at 3 months and think they know everything imaginable about respiratory distress. Their experiences do not relate to yours- it's the equivalent of comparing childbirth to removing a diva cup. The planet we get to live on is a different one, where every few weeks/days/months, something happens bad enough that we go "thank god he came through that one, I'm so glad he's here" and you are constantly reminded of your blessings.
Sorry if it sounded like I'm scaremongering, but this is not something to take lightly.

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#17 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 05:07 PM
 
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Kids crash FAST, much faster than adults. If you don't get that nebulizer going while they are still breathing well enough to inhale the medication, VERY ugly things can happen.
Yes, ds was on the neb for most of his infancy and early toddlerhood. He is now 2.5 and has an inhaler (two different meds-- one to treat an acute attack and one he used to use twice daily but now only needs to use that regularly if he has gotten a cold, if the weather is rapidly becoming more damp, etc.).

As his airways have grown, his breathing has gotten much better. BUT as soon as he gets a cold, we start with his daily treatments and move in to treat his attacks as necessary. A couple of times we have held off because he wasn't wheezing much yet and looked okay, but each of those times, he "crashed" fast and nearly ended up in the hospital. We ended up at the docs office with everyone in a panic because he was in bad shape. We also ended up doing the more serious oral steroids in *addition* to the neb/inhaler in those cases. So holding off on the neb/inhaler didn't save him anything.

I definitely get how it is to have mixed feelings about this stuff. My ds has a number of special needs, and I still struggled with this one in particular. I remember researching and worrying and tossing and turning in bed at night for a while over my decision to go forward with the breathing treatments vs. trying endless alternatives. But looking back, I can tell I made a good decision in doing them, and it was such a short time in his life when he needed it daily.

As I understand it, the most serious effects of the inhaler and nebulizer treatments usually don't come into play unless there is an ever-increasing dose given over many years. That said, not as much with his inhaler meds, but with his nebulizer, my ds used to have a harder time sleeping at night if we gave his meds too close to bed. Usually we'd just try to do his last treatment by 4pm at the latest. When we have to do treatments all night long (some scary episodes with breathing challenges), we just know he may not sleep so well.

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#18 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 05:29 PM
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Flapjack, you were quite eloquent and you stated it beautifully. I just wanted to correct a minor misconception.

We don't use nebulizers as a 'first line of defense' unless the child is unable to properly use a spacer and inhaler (which is common in the very young crowd)
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#19 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 06:21 PM
 
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Flapjack, you were quite eloquent and you stated it beautifully. I just wanted to correct a minor misconception.

We don't use nebulizers as a 'first line of defense' unless the child is unable to properly use a spacer and inhaler (which is common in the very young crowd)
That is REALLY good to hear. I saw three or four kids and siblings from my DDC (American, obviously) who have been prescribed nebulisers for one reason or another in their toddler and baby years. My inner cynic assumes that it's related to the fact that most people have insurance which will pick up the tab, whereas prescriptions for all this stuff is free over here and I only know of one person who has a nebuliser.
OP, I get a lot of help from the people who run www.asthma.org.uk

Helen mum to five and mistress of mess and mayhem, making merry and mischief til the sun goes down.
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#20 of 156 Old 10-10-2007, 06:38 PM
 
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I personally love the neb. I remember how scary it was though when I was in your position. And how irritated and helpless I felt after reading the responses to a thread I wrote that was so similar to yours. I did NOT want them on meds like that. Our situation spun out of control with both boys needing hospital visits about once every two weeks. They would get cold after cold and we couldnt get a handle on it. We went on a steroid inhaler for the cold and flu season for that year. The nebs worked so well for us when the boys were sick . It really seemed like it kept us away from the hospital. I remember when we had to rely on the inhalers for emergencies. My oldest was taking the dose properly and with a spacer but it was only lasting 15 min or so for any relief. He started turning blue and it was so terrifying. Now I pull out the neb treatments at the first sign of a cold and it just seems to get the meds to him in a reliable way. We have kept out of the hospital for almost two years now... except for last christmas day with the little guy. I always bring it on vacation with me now too. ( If the mama in the US who sent us the neb for the holiday helper thread that year sees this... thanks again!) The mamas here have such great advice... they really do know what they are talking about.
On a side note... making changes in the home environment as far as making it less allergenic, really helped us even though the problem is Viral asthma. Making that effort made a huge difference for us!

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#21 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ThreeBeans View Post
No no no!

Do NOT hold off on a nebulizer treatment!

As a severe asthmatic and a former paramedic I can tell you that is absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

Kids crash FAST, much faster than adults. They can be fine, fine, fine, fine, DEAD. If you don't get that nebulizer going while they are still breathing well enough to inhale the medication, VERY ugly things can happen.
Yes. That.
My DD (age 3) was fine at bedtime, woke up at 7 am struggling, wouldn't do her inhaler, lay on the couch. She coughed up this horrible mucus... After transport to the ER, several treatments, oral steroids, transported to another hospital and seen by a resp. specialist, who told me that she was very near death, that the mucus was from her lungs.

I agree with flapjack, Singulair can make a dramatic difference in asthma control, but it is not one you see overnight. I think you should continue it, because I am pretty sure you will be glad you did. Also, instead of the salbutamol that flapjack refers to, it would be albuterol over here. However, it is easier to nebulize an unwilling child. And my DD, who hated it too, learned very quickly what a difference it made in her ability to breathe.

*Helen, I am so glad to hear Singulair helped Isaac so much!*

Also, re:steroid - yes, inhaled steroids are vastly preferable to oral steroids. We, too, have seen some growth repression, but in the past year she has grown over 3 inches, and seems to be catching up. A long-term study was done which showed that asthma pt. on inhaled steroids did catch up in height to the control group, after about age 12. Oral steroids, short term, with a tapering dose, will not have the worst of the side effects, but inhaled steroids will have much less, and when you weigh risk/benefit, it is worth it to have the asthma under control.

http://www.njc.org/disease-info/dise...hma/index.aspx
is my favorite site for learning about asthma - they are the leading place in the US for asthma and respiratory disease.

mama, this is very hard. Good luck.

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#22 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:15 AM
 
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I can tell you that we once parted the waters in the ER with an 18 mos old (now 13) who was having difficulty breathing due to a chest cold. He was fine-- i didn't even realize he had more than a cold, and then he started with labored breathing. I scooped him up and walked to the hospital (that was around the corner from my home). The waiting room was packed, and I didn't call ahead. Yet, the intake nurse and others at the reception desk took one look at him, and two people ran to open the door for us, and at the same time the intake person said "Come in, now!!". I never saw such a thing. One treatment later, he was toddling around, being charming. That shocked me.
This is so similar to what happened with my ds. Barely had a cold, then bam! Labored breathing. I took him to urgent care and they wanted to transfer him to the hospital because his oxygen levels were so low. But before they did, they gave him the nebulizer treatment and he was able to breathe again just fine.

Compared to what medical interventions you might face if the situation gets out of control, I think the nebulizer is extremely innocuous.

Wife to a wonderful dh and mom to four beautiful kiddos, dd (3/04):, ds1 (1/06), ds2 (10/08), and ds3 (7/10)
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#23 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:33 AM
 
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When I have an asthma attack, nobody but my dad who is an ashtmatic and my Smom who lived with my dad for 15years, could tell whats going on. I feel much worse than I look.
I agree with that.

Also, there will be behaviour issues from the meds, but there will also be from not medicating - just not obviously annoying to you ones. I was really quiet and easy to manage, because I didn't have the breath to run or scream!

I have been an asthmatic my whole life... I went undiagnosed for years as an uninsurred kid who just got a lot of colds : ... I remember being 6 or 7 sitting on our deck with my mom because I couldn't breathe well enough to sleep. It was pretty ridiculous not being medicated and really dangerous.

Mine is under control and I no longer need meds at most times, but walking in the suddenly cold air today with my Ergo on and pushing a stroller up a hill I realized that I have become complacent and I have got to put a puffer in my diaper bag.

My DH on the other hand, come into Asthma late in life and doesn't have the understanding that I do of it. He takes his meds too late, after he is already frustrated and exhausted and then just sleeps.

He also feels worse than he looks... I have to look closely to see why he is being so cranky - and he's a grown man that can clearly articulate himself.

I also want to second the neb vs the puffers. Even as a kid I knew that the neb works better for longer. Use the puffers for daily out of the house etc. but if they are really sick... turn on the TV loud and hook up the machine... it gets it in there so much better - especially because after it starts to take effect, then they will be able to breathe in the rest alot easier.

Mother to a wonderful 4 year old boy born March 2007 who was once fuzmalesling.gifbfolderchild.gifdiaper.gif and still familybed1.gif

Starting once more from the beginning and  expecting bigeyes.gif a surprise someone pos.gif in September

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#24 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:38 AM
 
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Just to expound on these stories, when my DD had that attack, we were in the ER for 8 hours; they would do a treatment, she would sit up and talk, then she would slowly sink down, her O2 #'s would slide down, she would turn grey again...another treatment, another temporary improvement... some oral steroids....another treatment....for EIGHT hours we did this. That is when they transferred and admitted her. She was kept overnight, because we had waited so long, she took that long to be stabilized.
I never want to go through that again, ever. THAT is why we do...
-inhaled steroid, daily
-Singulair, daily
-Nasonex, daily during spring and fall
-albuterol, rarely.

Another example, she needs the Nasonex in the fall, but at first I was sketchy on when in the fall to start. Her peak flow numbers, which indicate how her lung function is, were great. Wed, she starts with allergy symptoms, so I start the Nasonex - but it was too late, by Friday she is on albuterol every 4 hours, for three days, because I needed to get the Nasonex started before her allergies kicked in. You live and learn, but the price.....

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#25 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:53 AM
 
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He has never had a very severe asthma attack but usually gets horrible chest cold and some wheezing and has to be held in chair all night to sleep, etc. His breathing is rapid when this happens but not gasping. We keep switching docs, and we do like our current one, but they advise using the pulmicort and xopenex at FIRST SIGN of a cough or runny nose. Then if the cough and rapid breathing doesn't go away in a couple days, they put him on orapred (steroid). With all these medications, he goes quite crazy and I feel that they cause a whole other problem with his mood and behavior which makes it harder for him to heal.
just a few thoughts - the symptoms that you describe sound like they would be something i would like to avoid if i were in your ds's situation, no? wheezing, rapid breathing - doesn't sound like that would be within my comfort zone as the parent of an asthmatic child.

to add to the stories - before my ds went on preventative inhaled steroids (which he is on fall-spring), he was hospitalized for symptoms like you were describing. he was ten months old, crawling around like a banshee - and breathing rapidly and wheezing. repeated doses of albuterol did nothing. to the er we go - and his oxygen saturation is ridiculously low. you would NOT have known it. it was rather frightening to see er staff in a near panic as they read the numbers.

our asthma specialist also recommended that we start ds back on the pulmicort at the first sign of a cold. even though ds is a little runny in the nose, it's staying out of his chest.

my advice - find an allergy/asthma specialist who will listen to you and answer your questions conprehensively. we're as crunchy as they come with most things, but i am not willing to mess around with ds's breathing. yes, he probably is a little smaller than he would be without this for the third winter in a row, and yes, he can get hyper and have some meltdowns - but in terms of that, i don't think it is necessarily worse than your average 2 yr old, or worse than he is over the summer when he is not on a steroid, or worse than just normal sick-grumpiness. hth
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#26 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 12:56 AM
 
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I understand not wanting to do a daily med. But I suggest that you really think about singulair.
It has meant we hardly ever use our nebulizer. When we (foolishly) weaned off he began having attacks and we were using the nebulizer daily, sometimes multiple times.
We put him back on and he's back to using it maybe once a month.

Our integrative medicine doctor said in some ways singulair is more like a supplement than a medication (I have no clue; I just know he was perfectly comfortable with it and he is an alternative practioner).

Rachelle, mommy to 8 year old boys! 

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#27 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 01:03 AM
 
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"The days are long, but the years are short."
Sharon! I live by this with my kids. I've never seen anyone else with such a siggy. Thank you for the reminder.
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#28 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 05:56 PM
 
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UUmom - I need to keep reminding myself of it....

OP, here's an asthma thread that might be helpful for you...
https://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=740402

~*The days are long, but the years are short.*~
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#29 of 156 Old 10-11-2007, 07:16 PM
 
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My personal call, as I sit here with a not life-threatening viral-induced patch of asthma, feeling like I'm gasping for breath every single time, and wanting to cry because of it, and having real difficulty stopping coughing, and not looking AT ALL like I'm as distressed as I am, is give him the drugs!!!

Seriously, it's a horrendous horrendous feeling, and my breathing is not really any faster than normal. If I were non-verbal no-one would know how horrible it feels.
My thoughts exactly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeBeans View Post
No no no!

Do NOT hold off on a nebulizer treatment!

As a severe asthmatic and a former paramedic I can tell you that is absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

Kids crash FAST, much faster than adults. They can be fine, fine, fine, fine, DEAD. If you don't get that nebulizer going while they are still breathing well enough to inhale the medication, VERY ugly things can happen.
VERY UGLY!


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Originally Posted by lexapurple View Post
:

When I have an asthma attack, nobody but my dad who is an ashtmatic and my Smom who lived with my dad for 15years, could tell whats going on. I feel much worse than I look.
Thsta how I feel.

Doing what I can to make better choices every day!
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#30 of 156 Old 10-12-2007, 03:46 AM
 
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I went and got a new inhaler today
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