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OK cracking myself up with the title, there. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
The little one has been a night owl since the day she was born. She was born at 5 am and frequently would be up and down all night until that hour when she was a newborn. After 5 am, she's always slept beautifully and soundly. We've had various ups and downs since then, especially around teething, but it has worked out fairly well since dh and I are night owls too. We're comfortable going to bed at midnight, and later isn't so bad if necessary.<br><br>
However, lately she has taken to fighting sleep and things are getting pretty ugly as far as sleep deprivation goes. She takes good naps during the day but night time is ridiculous. She'll go to sleep at 11 pm, but inevitably will wake up at 1 and stay up until 4 or 5. So I thought ok, maybe she thinks the 11 o'clock sleep is a nap, so I'll keep her up through it. No difference. In fact, there seems to be no pattern at all to when she naps vs when she goes to bed. She wants to go to bed at 4:30 am, and even if she is EXHAUSTED and has been up for 7 hours, she will kick and scream and fight to keep herself awake until then.<br><br>
We've tried nursing in bed, nursing in a chair, nursing and then pacing, nursing then pacing with daddy, pacing with daddy then nursing, sitting and staring into space...in each case she will start to fall asleep, then literally start slapping herself and me to wake up.<br><br>
I'm sure it's just a phase, but any tips on making it a short phase???
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BelgianSheepDog</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7930732"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We've tried nursing in bed, nursing in a chair, nursing and then pacing, nursing then pacing with daddy, pacing with daddy then nursing, sitting and staring into space...in each case she will start to fall asleep, then literally start slapping herself and me to wake up.</div>
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I'm thinking that she is actually not wanting to be awake, just needing more help to stay asleep. My LO (10 mos) does the slapping thing when she is falling asleep. I don't know what it is, but I have definitely found it to be right before she falls asleep. She also does a smacking sound with her mouth that she will do in the day also, but when she awakens at night as well (and goes right back to sleep).<br><br>
It is hard to recognize when they are trying to wake up and when they actually need to be put back to sleep. Lots of times DD will cry and sit up in bed, so DH gets her up and says "she was wide awake". But if I go in and nurse her, she goes right back to sleep. My guideline is the clock and what I know to be her normal sleep patterns. If she has only been in bed for an hour or so (for example), I never assume she wants to get up, and 99% of the time, she goes back to sleep.<br><br>
I would just say to stay calm and keep nursing when she does these things. Even if it seems that she is wide awake, try assuming that she is actually not waking up, but trying to fall back asleep. I'm not sure the best way to explain it. But definitely DON'T: start talking, turn on the light, make sudden movements, etc. Stay in "going to sleep" mode as long as it takes, if you know she is tired.<br><br>
On the other hand, if it is close to her bedtime but she is fighting it, sometimes a change of scenery helps. Go in another room for 1/2 hour or so, then try again. (I find this especially true if we have been playing in DD's room. It's hard to transition from play to sleep when you're in the same room. She needs more of a "marker" to tell her it's time to go to bed.) Play soothing music, read a story, anything to help her think about sleep. And try to be somewhat consistent.<br><br>
Hopefully someone else will have more suggestions. That is just my hunch.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
No advice, just sympathy. All three of mine were/are nightowls. I once complained and my dh once sarcastically said, "I have no idea who they get that from!" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/Sheepish.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Sheepish">:<br><br>
Have you ever read Mary Sheedy Kurcinka's Sleepless in America? It's a great read for everyone, IMO <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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That doesn't sound like fun at all, but I am really impressed that you were able to put a funny title on it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I think leila1213 is right on. I would also add that when my dd fights sleep (and she does, including hitting herself and me, and more recently, holding one eye open with her fingers!) but really needs to go to sleep, the only way I have found is to basically physically restrain her. If we are nursing, I wrap my legs around hers and hold her hands still. If that doesn't work or if we are not nursing, I wear her in the wrap (seems to be the most restrictive carrier IMO), tuck her hands under each of my arms, and pace. If worst comes to worst, I pull out the Dustbuster (softer white noise like a fan sometimes doesn't do it).
 
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