Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my new goal. $100 a week with only one trip to the g-store. Anyone do this? Can it be done? Wise women share your secrets please<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Eat">.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
For how many people?<br><br>
It definitely can be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,237 Posts
I do it but I have to start with a well stocked kitchen and only restock as needed. I can't buy olive oil and baking supplies and butter and bread and pasta and 5 lbs of beans and a 20 lb bag of rice and other non-perishables all in the same week.<br>
I spend about $30-40 on produce, $20-30 on staples and sauces and condiments, and the rest on perishables and snacks. I also like to have at least $10 of my budget for stocking up on a sale item. Like when tofu is only $1 I will buy 4 and freeze two of them. Sometimes produce is expensive and I have to take from that $10 and skip sale items. We go through a lot of produce here. I spent $20 on strawberries, bananas, tomatoes, lettuce, carrots, broccoli, and apples on Saturday and all I have left is 1 lb of strawberries and 1 lb of carrots. I don't count non-food items in this budget like toilet paper and laundry soap. I also break up and freeze overripe bananas or berries and make smoothies or fruit pancakes on weekends.<br>
My family consists of me and 3 kids ages 9,7,5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,214 Posts
<span>$100 is £65.13 so depending on how many your shopping for then yes that is very possible i managed to a 2 week shop for me and my 4 children including nappies, wipes and new tooth brushes, mouthwash and toothpaste for all 4 children plus toothpaste and mouthwash for me for £120 ($184.24)</span>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
34,292 Posts
Yep, I do this for a family of 6. It doesn't include any household stuff or personal care supplies though. I use coupons, stockpile, cook from scratch, and have an Amish-run surplus outlet I shop at. I shop every two weeks, but have to hit multiple stores.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
I'm trying to get there, but this does include all household stuff for our family. It's kind of hard. My husband (I'm a sahm) gets paid once a month unless he has overtime or something. I'm trying to budget so the end of the month isn't so lean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,831 Posts
Depending on your local cost of living, yeah it can be done, $100 is my ideal budget. But realistically, I'm shopping for the five in our house with about $75/ week. Granted I've had a stash of grass-fed beef (that's about to run out) and some other things that I've squirreled away here or there, but with careful planning and attention to ads, flyers, and some memorized prices (or a price book) it sure can be done. We do a fair amount of from-scratch cooking, esp with both of us working.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,595 Posts
It can totally be done. I go every 2 weeks and spend $150ish if I need to really stock up or there's some really good sales.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,948 Posts
I live in a high COL area and spend around $100/week on groceries for 2 adults and a ravenous almost-5yo. I shop sales and use coupons, and have a stockpile of toiletries from couponing at CVS sales.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is inspiring! I wish I could go with all of you in your back pocket to see how you actually do this. I live in northern Colorado, prices are high here. I am also obsessed with nutrition, So I have a REALLY hard time buying crappy meat and non-organic produce.<br>
Would anyone be willing to share their $100 meal plan? TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,307 Posts
I do $75/week for 2 adults (one preggo), and 2 kids, ages almost 2 and almost 4. This includes toiletries and dog food and stuff like toilet paper for us.<br><br>
It's tight, but it's doable. I do hit multiple stores, but I also only shop once a week, if that makes sense. My kids know that if we run out of fresh fruit on Wed night, they might have canned pineapple with lunch on Thursday (I shop on Friday). That's okay with me. We usually also end up with frozen veggies on Thursday night, instead of fresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,595 Posts
This is my meal plan for May (basically, I'll probably move things around a bit).<br><br>
1-spaghetti, salad, bread<br>
2-fried fish, fries, veggie<br>
3-dinner at my mom's<br>
4-paella<br>
5-potato pancakes, bacon, fruit<br>
6-leftovers<br>
7-pizza<br>
8-hamburgers, fries<br>
9-don't know, but I'm not cooking!<br>
10-dinner at my mom's<br>
11-pork chops, potatoes, veggie<br>
12-leftovers<br>
13-meatloaf, mashed potatoes, corn<br>
14-pizza<br>
15-ham, potatoes, green beans<br>
16-ham and pineapple and roasted potatoes for the boys, ham sandwiches for dh and I<br>
17-dinner at my mom's<br>
18-fish sandwiches, freis<br>
19-leftovers<br>
20-penne in vodka sauce, salad, bread<br>
21-pizza<br>
22-baked potatoes<br>
23-fried chicken, mashed potatoes, corn<br>
24-dinner at my mom's<br>
25-salmon cakes, pasta, veggie<br>
26-leftovers<br>
27-breakfast<br>
28-pizza<br>
29-paninis, chips, veggie<br>
30-tacos<br>
31-dinner at my mom's<br><br><br>
I don't have to buy meat, we raise our own so I have freezers full of meat. I grow our own veggies and some fruit so the only produce I buy is what's on sale/in season. So apples, carrots, potatoes and cabbage right now.<br><br>
I shop the sales and stock up. I can get 6 packs of bagels on sale for $1 a pack so we buy lots. Same for anything else we use. I don't shop alot of stores, just 2 because I know them, I know how their sales run and I can get everything I need at one or the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
ALYANTAVID--That is so great that you raise your own meat. We have a bee box for honey, and will be getting chickens next year...<br><br>
We are a family of 4...BTW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,237 Posts
We are vegetarian so maybe that makes it easier to stay in my budget.<br>
I generally buy organic sauces and condiments but when it comes to produce, I often buy local rather than organic. I don't buy commercial produce very often but sometimes will get a bag of clementines or avocados or cherub tomatoes. Carrots, potatoes, broccoli, and bananas have to be organic. I can often get local apples, onions, lettuce, tomatoes, cherries, peaches, asparagus...<br><br>
Last night's dinner was veggie fried rice (organic sweet potato cubes, diced organic celery, and organic broccoli) and oven roasted organic tofu strips seasoned with fresh herbs, organic wheat free tamari, and nutrtional yeast. So the herbs and rice were not organic. I buy rice in bulk and the 25 lb bag I bought in December still has at least 2 or 3 lbs left.<br>
I packed lunch for the kids and used Dave's Killer bread, vegenaise, and organic garbanzo beans from a can. Mountain High Raspberry yogurt portioned out into containers. It's not organic but I think it's quality ingredients and affordable. Organic strawberries and 100% tree top apple juice.<br>
For dinner we will likely have enchiladas. I buy locally made white corn tortillas so they are fresh and no preservatives but not organic. I use Tillamook extra sharp cheddar which is also not organic but it is vegetarian and made with milk from hormone-free, antibiotic-free cows. I use the organic enchilada sauce at safeway that is next to all the salsas and around $2. I put organic black beans inside and chopped olives (not organic). We top with fresh squeezed lime and avocado slices (neither are organic). The pan of enchiladas is enough for dinner for the family and lunches the next day. I sometimes serve a side of rice.<br><br>
I also like to soak beans (I buy organic beans in bulk) overnight for chili or bean soup. I can then make big batches and freeze the extra. And make triple batches of pancakes on weekends and freeze the extras for snacks later. I also take advantage of sales on Organic bread and put them in the freezer.<br><br>
Sometimes I compromise when it's the end of the month and money is getting tighter and I'll buy Kirin Ichiban ramen (not top ramen) and then just use the noodles to cook a quick noodle stir fry with whatever veggies I still have. I make a lot of different beans and/or rice dishes from bean and rice burritos to lentil veggie soup and rice or even baked potatoes covered with chili. My son is sensitive to gluten, just not allergic, so we don't do a lot of pasta.<br><br>
Did that give you some ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
We're a family of three (2 adults and a kiddo) and we spend around $100/week at stores. We have chickens for eggs and get milk from a farmer, so those things aren't included in our grocery tabs. We also buy a lot of our meat in bulk from a local farm, so that's not in here either. We don't eat a lot of meat, but we buy the good stuff, so it's not cheap.<br><br>
$100 is definitely doable, especially since you're vegetarian. The thing that would not be doable for us is to do all of our shopping at the same store.<br><br>
We belong to a food co-op where I do a huge trip (usually costs $150 or so) once a month. We get (all organic) rice, pasta, beans, lentils, oatmeal, flour, sugar, tofu, soy milk (DD's allergic to cow's), coffee, cheese, some fruits and veg, spices and a few other things here.<br><br>
We have an Asian market where we get coconut milk, curry paste, nan, and sauces.<br><br>
During nice weather we get our vegetables and fruit at our farmer's market. We're doing a CSA share this year as well, so that will be awesome.<br><br>
We get most of our other food like cereal, chips, condiments, granola bars, fruit, veg, etc. at a regular grocery store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,404 Posts
We are a family of three (2 adults and an always hungry, high metabolism, eats more than me every day child) and we spend $335 per month (averaged over the year) for all purchased food (not dining out and not household supplies). Plus, we feed our cat a raw food diet and her food comes out of the $335 every month, too.<br><br>
I have to give kudos to my DH. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> He does most of the cooking and most of the food shopping. He goes into the store and gets what he needs and gets out of the store. He is far faster and more efficient than I am with groceries. (I excel with non-food shopping.) He also goes along with my desires to better our food quality as long as I initiate the changes and do the research for him...basically make it easy for him to get into a store, buy the stuff we need, and get out....same routine for him, just a different place and different quality food.<br><br>
The key for us staying in budget (and still eating healthy) is to shop at different stores for different things. DH generally goes grocery shopping once a week and his max is two stores and they must be near each other. It isn't the same 1-2 stores each week and that is how we get the various foods at the best prices.<br><br>
We also have a year-round CSA (organic, local produce) that I pick up once every two weeks and split with another family. That cost is included in the $335 per month average. We pay once a quarter, so that month is over $335 which means other months must be under $335.<br><br>
Most of our veggies and some of our fruit now come from the CSA and we fill in at our local hfs and farmer's markets, as needed (specific veggies for certain meals or if we run out or if we just want something not grown at the farm). We also grow a bit of our food (three varieties of lettuces, broccoli, beets, blueberries, and random other things--mostly herbs). We have a teeny, tiny townhome yard that is more like a large patio with two small garden areas, we also trade with neighbors and friends who grow organically.<br><br>
We buy fish and dairy and eggs mostly at Trader Joe's. Some convenience frozen food (just a few very specific items). Other random things, too, including certain snacks and canned food (not much of either of these which is why I lumped them in with random things).<br><br>
Rice and beans typically come from our local hfs in the bulk bins.<br><br>
DH does 90% of the above shopping. I may be in the store with him, but he is on his own agenda and I either follow along or focus on the non-food items at break-neck speed to finish at his pace! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Mostly, though, I use these times for researching our best options (quality/price points). DD almost always goes with DH whereas I opt to do something else about half the time. It is good daddy-daughter time. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> I do the above shopping 10% of the time on my own or with DD, as needed, when I am running other errands.<br><br>
We buy most of our meat (for us and the cat) and cheese at Costco and a few random other food items (along with some non-food items and nearly all gas for the cars). We also get our bread and tortillas here (locally made). It is almost always a family "event" due to location. The closest Costco (5 miles away) has Ikea, Lowes, and a great library in the same parking lot. Another Costco is in a general area where we can get nearly all our shopping done in a short period of time. (It is 10 miles away in the opposite direction, but saves gas overall because we can go to a dozen places -- including a library in a different system, as needed, in one swoop.)<br><br>
We buy baking soda, vinegar, syrup, toilet paper, and paper towels at Smart & Final due to price. Every time I price it out, S&F comes out the lowest per unit price on these items and the highest quality for most (the vinegar is for cleaning, so I don't care if it is the best). Well, syrup is because of the brand and DH simply likes that particular brand and I don't care either way. We never see it elsewhere, so price comparison is not possible. We only need these items a few times a year, so this store gets worked into rotation as needed. I will pick up frozen raw fish for the cat here, too.<br><br>
We will stop into either of our neighborhood typical grocery stores for certain things or if we need something in a hurry (both are walking distance and one or the other is on the way home no matter which direction we come into our neighborhood). One store has better meat and DH will find random reduced-for-quick-sale meat for the kitty and/or us once in awhile. These places have sales around the clock on <i>something,</i> so if we're having a party I choose from the sale items before meal planning and filling in elsewhere.<br><br>
I get most of our random organic foods (and non-food items) from a local discount store at the best prices in this area usually (I keep track in my head), which is located near the Costco 10 miles away and across the street from a great hfs and more... Whenever I need to run a bunch of errands, I almost always choose to drive this direction and hit the discount store FIRST and then fill in with the other dozen+ places nearby (including two thrift stores to drop off and/or browse). The catch is you never know what they will have, so you cannot rely on them to have anything specific. I call it treasure hunting and enjoy it once a month. I typically check the website for coupons and specials the night before I go and try to only go the last week of the month (so I know how much of our budget I have to work with) as soon as they open (because the good stuff goes fast). Nothing there is refrigerated or frozen, so it works well to have it be the first stop even if I have a lot of other shopping to do. DH has only been here once (with me). It doesn't work well for his way of shopping.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
Well Boulder is like the "Berkeley, CA" of Colorado if that helps anyone visualize costs and "vibe". <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br><br><br><br>
Do you shop at the Sunflower Market? I find they are like a Vitamin Cottage/King Soopers/Whole Foods mix. Wednesday's are double ad day where last weeks and this weeks sales are good. Also keep up with the King Soopers specials.<br><br><br>
Whole Foods and Safeway are the most expensive there.<br><br><br>
The farmers markets will be starting soon, check to see if hitting the one in Golden might get better prices if the Boulder ones seem to be marking them up for the area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Thystle</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371165"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well Boulder is like the "Berkeley, CA" of Colorado if that helps anyone visualize costs and "vibe". <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br><br><br><br>
Do you shop at the Sunflower Market? I find they are like a Vitamin Cottage/King Soopers/Whole Foods mix. Wednesday's are double ad day where last weeks and this weeks sales are good. Also keep up with the King Soopers specials.<br><br><br>
Whole Foods and Safeway are the most expensive there.<br><br><br>
The farmers markets will be starting soon, check to see if hitting the one in Golden might get better prices if the Boulder ones seem to be marking them up for the area.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thank you Thystle! You hit the nail on the head there with the prices!<br><br>
I have a, like a lot/ not like at all feelings towards Sunflower FM, but yea some good deals have been found there. I Loath Safeway! I have found ways to shop @ WFM, but still I want to save more $$.<br><br>
Oh yes the farmers market, it can be like therapy to me, until I spend $40 on spinach...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,172 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>herbmama3-7</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371540"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thank you Thystle! You hit the nail on the head there with the prices!<br><br>
I have a, like a lot/ not like at all feelings towards Sunflower FM, but yea some good deals have been found there. I Loath Safeway! I have found ways to shop @ WFM, but still I want to save more $$.<br><br>
Oh yes the farmers market, it can be like therapy to me, until I spend $40 on spinach...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
ITA your location is going to make it difficult, but maybe focusing the resource (i.e. the bulk bin at whole foods) that you do have. Also learning how to bake bread, ect. could be helpful.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
Any chance you can garden where you are? Even maybe a few pots to grow said $$$ spinach in? That would be VERY easy to do! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br><br>
Maybe a CSA?<br><br><br>
Sunflower is a weird mix but has awesome deals usually each week, and a not horrid organic selection if you are trying to save money. Each store is a bit different, and you can try the "Sprouts" store too which are similar.<br><br><br>
Occasionaly shopping in Denver might save you some money as Boulder is marked up.<br><br><br>
Costco has alot more organics than Sam's Club, but it also has alot more "luxury" and marked up items. But if you can stay true and not buy a little of this and that it could help for some bulk purchases.<br><br><br><br>
And definately watch Vitamin Cottage for their specials and check out their marked down fruits and veggies (usually in bags marked about $1 under the stands) and the clearance rack.<br><br><br>
Email every company you buy organics/naturals/anything from and ask for coupons. And join online the Mambo Sprouts thingy from Whole Foods as they will send you more coupons too!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top