Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,576 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm doing a critical essay on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and in the essay mention that Mary W gave birth to Shelley at home. My professor made the comment that women at this time typically labored and birthed at home. However I thought I had read tat due to complications she was advised to birth at a hospital? and chose to stay in the quiet of her home.<br><br>
I'm currently look for info regarding typical birth at this time, but can't find anything. Could one of you mamas know about this?<br><br>
Thanks.<br><br>
PS- did you know that Sojourner Truth was born around 1797? It was a good year <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,048 Posts
<a href="http://www.bookrags.com/Obstetrics_and_gynecology" target="_blank">This</a> might be helpful <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I've generally thought it wasn't until the 1800's that childbirth was even seen as something that a physician would "handle." I would totally believe that <i>most</i> women stayed at home to birth during time period <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Good luck with your paper!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,678 Posts
I remember reading about Mary Shelley's homebirth. She started hemorrhaging and her husband put her in an ice bath to stop the bleeding and saved her life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,576 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks. She did have fanny at a type of birthing hospital but refused the forceps commonly used by doctors of the time.<br><br>
She delivered MS prematurely and died from infection (doctor interference) 10 days later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,576 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, since 1797 is well into the 18th century I would think seeing a man-midwife would be common- ha MW not been a feminist.<br><br>
I appreciated that site. Now to find the biographical info I read earlier...
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top