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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hopefully someone will have some experience or advice with this!

My 2 1/2 month old has been breastfeeding happily and very successfully - enough that he has been gaining a pound a week on average! However, in the last week or so, he will act hungry and give me signals that he wants to eat, then he will start crying when I try to feed him! Sometimes even when I am putting him in position to eat, and I haven't even offered him the breast yet. Other times, he will just eat like normal. It's all very frustrating, but I am trying to be very calm with him and not to act frustrated. But it definitely effects me emotionally, since that has been something that has been so pleasant so far.

One thing I'm wondering is whether he has been eating more than he wants to, and thus the rapid weight gain? Does he want to just suck, and then he has to eat? He needs help to find a finger (keeps his thumb tightly in his fist so far) and he enjoys sucking on that when he does get help. Then, often he gets frustrated and acts like he wants food, then the crying starts when I try to feed him...

Luckily, he does eat very well some of the time, otherwise I'd be concerned that he wasn't getting any food.

I hope someone can help! Thanks!
 

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I experienced exactly what you are describing when my daughter was about the same age, and it was very frustrating. Everything you are talking about, from the pound a week weight gain, to refusing the breast--that happened to us, too.

My problem was oversupply, though I did not know it at the time. I felt like I couldn't "read her signs" because half the time when I thought she wanted to nurse, she would refuse. I now know this is a result of the fact that she was getting too much to eat, but still had the urge to suck. It was difficult for me to diagnose at the time, and left me feeling inadequate as a mom, and a breastfeeder, because my attempts to be responsive to her didn't seem to always work.

I had oversupply issues, and they caused the symptoms you are describing but of course every case is individual, and just because it was the case with me doesn't mean it is so with you. But it doesn't hurt to have information about oversupply, because it is a possible culprit! It is actually a pretty common issue, more common than low supply issues.

Here are some symptoms of oversupply.
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/fast-letdown.html

Other symptoms may include frequent mastitis, milk blisters, or plugged ducts, feeling like baby is "allergic" to your milk or something in it, sore nipples (may include vasospasms, where nipple changes color as baby comes off, or a compression stripe, a white stripe on nipple as baby comes off), mom may have tried an elimination diet, or on the advice of a doctor, eliminated dairy, etc, feeling engorged often, particularly after the first 2-3 mo, baby may have rapid weight gain, up to a pound a week, mom may also ask where she can donate all of her excess milk and regularly be able to pump a lot extra. Of course any given mom may have an oversupply issue and have only some of these symptoms. My symptoms included only some of these issues.

Symptoms in the baby may be loose/explosive stool, green stool, very gassy and upset stomach, spit up. Baby may not comfort nurse, or may be upset during or after letdown when he is trying to comfort nurse, because he doesn't want more milk.

For Katie, it was more a gassiness issue, a general discomfort, lack of comfort nursing and rapid weight gain of a pound a week. My symptoms included frequently feeling engorged, being able to pump a lot, spraying milk during let down, and vasospasms.

A common pattern for oversupply babies is to nurse, spit up, and 10-40 minutes later be hungry again, nurse, spit up a lot, and repeat this cycle often. Mom may feel like baby "cannot possibly be hungry again" and some moms actually question if they have enough milk. (This was not the case with me--Katie had a normal nursing pattern and no spit up issues but still had oversupply problems.)

This is because baby fills up on foremilk, which is not calorie dense, and doesn't get enough calorie dense hindmilk. Per ounce, foremilk and hindmilk have the same amount of lactose, but baby, in order to get enough calories, takes in way too much foremilk, thus too much lactose, instead of a balance. Empty breasts produce hindmilk. Baby never gets satiated because he never gets hindmilk. Babies don't have lactose intolerance in the way we think of it as adults, but too much of it can cause upset tummies.

Some mothers find a solution is to block nurse--see the link, I think it explains it pretty well. Nurse on one side, whenever baby even slightly indicates that they want to nurse, for a block of 2.5-3 hours to start. Pump other side TO COMFORT only, not to empty. This is important as it prevents breast issues, mastitis, etc. There are other solutions if that does not work. Feel free to PM me or respond to this thread if you have any questions about this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
LolaK, Thanks, I did bring this up at a meeting and they taslked about fast letdown and suggested feeding him against gravity, that doesn't always help, though. Once a month isn't often enough for meetings at this stage!


Thank you, Keri, I think this is probably my problem as well. I had looked on kellymom's site but hadn't realized that this could be it. It makes sense, though.

I haven't had mastitis or clogged ducts, but sometimes I do have fast letdown sometimes and until very recently I have had engorgement issues, I have just pumped for storage when I do (probably how I have avoided clogged ducts and mastitis). I can often pump 5 ounces from one side when it is fairly engorged. I'll have to look for vasospasms and a compression stripe. I did see a stripe this morning, and I have noticed that sometimes my nipples are lighter right after he finishes nursing, is this vasospasms?

Emerson has had gassiness, green stools (sometimes), explosive/loose stools, and he spits up a few times a day, plus he does tend to pull off several times toward the beginning of a feeding sometimes.

Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
A common pattern for oversupply babies is to nurse, spit up, and 10-40 minutes later be hungry again, nurse, spit up a lot, and repeat this cycle often. Mom may feel like baby "cannot possibly be hungry again" and some moms actually question if they have enough milk.
This sounds VERY familiar. He doesn't always do this, but he does eat very often sometimes (he'll sometimes wait to spit up and then he's hungry right after that). I KNOW I have enough milk, but sometimes I've wondered why he wants to eat so often, and sometimes "snacks" all day. I know sometimes they do that in the evening and that is normal, but all day makes things challenging. I have heard that green poop can come from too much foremilk, so a possible imbalance makes a lot of sense, too.

I will try block feeding and see how that works. I already have been doing that sometimes when he doesn't empty the breast at a feeding, but I'll try to be more deliberate about it.

I do have a question, though - I try to pump for storage periodically (so that DH has something to feed him when I go out to the store), and it's nice being able to pump 4-5 ounces at a sitting (to get it over with), but maybe I should be pumping smaller amounts instead of a full breast, then? I think probably I should, but then won't he be just getting foremilk in the bottle? And is this OK?

Thanks so much for a very helpful and informative reply!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
Thank you, Keri, I think this is probably my problem as well. I had looked on kellymom's site but hadn't realized that this could be it. It makes sense, though.
I only realized that I had such an oversupply issue after attending a seminar on the subject a few weeks ago. I wish someone had mentioned the possibility to me when Katie was 2 or 3 or even 4 months old, so that I could've thought over the symptoms and decided if it sounded like what was going on with us. But oh well. Next baby I will be on the lookout! With Katie, we eventually outgrew the issue when she was 9mo and my period returned when she started solids. She then went about six months and only gained one pound in that time period, and she is now a healthy, chunky toddler. I think it "evened out" in the end, but it probably would have been better for her to gain more steadily. She actually nurses a lot more now than she did when she was a baby (10-12x/day now), and started to comfort nurse after my supply normalized.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
I haven't had mastitis or clogged ducts, but sometimes I do have fast letdown sometimes and until very recently I have had engorgement issues, I have just pumped for storage when I do (probably how I have avoided clogged ducts and mastitis). I can often pump 5 ounces from one side when it is fairly engorged. I'll have to look for vasospasms and a compression stripe. I did see a stripe this morning, and I have noticed that sometimes my nipples are lighter right after he finishes nursing, is this vasospasms?
I always had a stripe on the left side. I was told it was "due to bad latch and she would outgrow it." A number of lactation consultants couldn't find anything wrong with her latch, but when she came off, there would be a white stripe across my nipple. My assumption now is that she was compressing the nipple in order to slow or stop the flow of milk, not so much because it was too fast, but just because it was too much and what she really wanted was to comfort nurse. Vasospasms are often tri-phasic, or bi-phasic, where the nipple changes color from white to purple to red. I would basically see the nipple turn white when she came off the breast sometimes, and I was actually diagnosed with Raynauds because my nipples started turning white at other times (like when I got out of the shower) and I had pain associated with it as well. Here is a link to info on vasospasms: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/...blanching.html

Some mothers have sore nipples for months because baby is constantly trying to slow the flow of milk, and oversupply goes undiagnosed, and practitioners can't figure out what's up--they'll frequently treat for thrush! Interesting, isn't it!
When I pumped, I would have the same result as you, about 5-6 oz per breast. I ended up having 600 extra ounces and donating most of it. I was so paranoid about undersupply issues, that was my biggest fear, to not be "able" to breastfeed. I was reassured by all the extra in the freezer, and by my baby gaining a pound a week, as evidence that I could successfully breastfeed. I never had blocked ducts, milk blisters, or mastitis either, but you can reduce your supply gradually and safely without having these issues.

Here's the problem with pumping if you have oversupply issues. Your breasts are set up to produce just enough milk for baby, but lots of factors can impact that. The way mothers nurse, such as switching sides a lot to stimulate both breasts, and thus emptying both breasts of milk partially instead of one fully, will stimulate the breasts to produce more milk overall. A full breast sends back the signal to make less in the future--I forget what its called, some kind of "uptake inhibitor." I think I'm getting the term wrong, but basically, the full breast reacts to being full by telling itself to make less milk later. So if a mother has an oversupply problem, she can benefit from her breasts being (comfortably!) full often, until her supply regulates. Stress on comfortably, because with uncomfortably full, the chances for mastitis or blocked ducts increase. So it's important to pump and ounce or two to "take the edge off." It's also important not to pump to empty until the supply is regulated, because it interferes with what the breasts are being told to produce.

Another issue is that babies are not really designed at a young age to drink 5-6 ounces at a feeding. If a baby has to drink that much on one side just to get through to the empty, hindmilk producing breast, then there is possibly going to be a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance. Block nursing can solve that problem, too, because baby will start nursing on a partially emptied breast, hopefully frequently, and the other, full breast, will be sending "slow down production" signals.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
Emerson has had gassiness, green stools (sometimes), explosive/loose stools, and he spits up a few times a day, plus he does tend to pull off several times toward the beginning of a feeding sometimes.
Although rapid weight gain alone does not necessarily mean an oversupply issue, together with not comfort nursing, mom feeling uncomfortably full, and these issues, it does sound like you have many of the main symptoms.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
This sounds VERY familiar. He doesn't always do this, but he does eat very often sometimes (he'll sometimes wait to spit up and then he's hungry right after that). I KNOW I have enough milk, but sometimes I've wondered why he wants to eat so often, and sometimes "snacks" all day. I know sometimes they do that in the evening and that is normal, but all day makes things challenging. I have heard that green poop can come from too much foremilk, so a possible imbalance makes a lot of sense, too.
If he is always nursing from a partially full breast, then he is likely getting more foremilk than he needs. You know when baby is nursing at an "empty" breast, but content? That is when he is getting the most hindmilk. It almost feels like he's not getting any milk, because the breast is empty and the nursing isn't vigourous. This is one of the reasons why it is important to let baby decide when to come off the breast, instead of switching when he seems done.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
I will try block feeding and see how that works. I already have been doing that sometimes when he doesn't empty the breast at a feeding, but I'll try to be more deliberate about it.
Let me know if you need more info on block nursing, and definitely update on how its going! Remember not to push your body too hard, and pump a little on the other side when you are uncomfortable instead of trying to "tough it out" if you know what I mean.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
I do have a question, though - I try to pump for storage periodically (so that DH has something to feed him when I go out to the store), and it's nice being able to pump 4-5 ounces at a sitting (to get it over with), but maybe I should be pumping smaller amounts instead of a full breast, then? I think probably I should, but then won't he be just getting foremilk in the bottle? And is this OK?
I'm not sure about this, in terms of saving the skim milk. When you pump at a completely full breast, and only pump a few ounces, what you get is likely to be foremilk. Pumping to empty when you are trying to regulate your supply won't benefit you in terms of regulation.

I have a few suggestions. Consider pumping right before you go, instead of more in advance, on one side only (maybe the same side he just nursed on, even), and only pump the milk you think dad will need, with an extra few ounces in the freezer just in case. I would just apply the theory of block feeding to pumping as well.

If you have milk saved up, you could pump an equivalent amount of foremilk, and give him the more balanced saved milk and dispose of the foremilk. If you have milk saved up and you think you can be comfortable going without pumping at all, then that might not be a bad choice either.

Bottom line, trust your instincts and do what you think is best!

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
Thanks so much for a very helpful and informative reply!
You're welcome
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
I only realized that I had such an oversupply issue after attending a seminar on the subject a few weeks ago. I wish someone had mentioned the possibility to me when Katie was 2 or 3 or even 4 months old, so that I could've thought over the symptoms and decided if it sounded like what was going on with us. But oh well. Next baby I will be on the lookout!
Well, I'm so glad I asked and that you were here to help!

Actually, the white stripe was across my areola, so I'm not sure if that's the same thing - maybe? I read about vasospasms and that doesn't sound like what I have experienced unless it is very mild. I don't have any pain associated with the slight color change, and it's not a huge change (just lighter "milky" pink). I'll keep an eye on this, though. I do sometimes notice a similar color change when I get out of the shower (usually when I'm leaking milk, also!


The compression lines are a good reminder that babies are amazingly smarter than anyone gives them credit for!


Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
When I pumped, I would have the same result as you, about 5-6 oz per breast. I ended up having 600 extra ounces and donating most of it. I was so paranoid about undersupply issues, that was my biggest fear, to not be "able" to breastfeed. I was reassured by all the extra in the freezer, and by my baby gaining a pound a week, as evidence that I could successfully breastfeed. I never had blocked ducts, milk blisters, or mastitis either, but you can reduce your supply gradually and safely without having these issues.
Well, that's great that you were able to donate so much, though I suppose next time you won't have so much extra knowing what you do now! I wasn't too worried about having enough milk, but the pound a week thing has alleviated any potential worries about that!

Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
Here's the problem with pumping if you have oversupply issues. Your breasts are set up to produce just enough milk for baby, but lots of factors can impact that. The way mothers nurse, such as switching sides a lot to stimulate both breasts, and thus emptying both breasts of milk partially instead of one fully, will stimulate the breasts to produce more milk overall. A full breast sends back the signal to make less in the future--I forget what its called, some kind of "uptake inhibitor." I think I'm getting the term wrong, but basically, the full breast reacts to being full by telling itself to make less milk later. So if a mother has an oversupply problem, she can benefit from her breasts being (comfortably!) full often, until her supply regulates. Stress on comfortably, because with uncomfortably full, the chances for mastitis or blocked ducts increase. So it's important to pump and ounce or two to "take the edge off." It's also important not to pump to empty until the supply is regulated, because it interferes with what the breasts are being told to produce.
Wow, that's really interesting! So by carefully switching sides each time we may be setting ourselves up for trouble!

One thing I have noticed in my experimentation today is that I kept him on one side for 4 hours and I still don't think he emptied it completely! Maybe I should pump to empty it and add that to my frozen supply? OTOH, then I might be telling my body to produce more milk... I didn't feel a need to pump any to avoid pain, but maybe it would be good to help him get some of the foremilk out of the way so he can get to the hindmilk easier? But then, pumping stimulates the breasts, kind of a catch-22.

Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
You know when baby is nursing at an "empty" breast, but content? That is when he is getting the most hindmilk. It almost feels like he's not getting any milk, because the breast is empty and the nursing isn't vigourous. This is one of the reasons why it is important to let baby decide when to come off the breast, instead of switching when he seems done.
He tends to do this when he's falling asleep for naps or especially at night. I let him stay on there as long as he wants, and he pretty much always pops off himself before he goes to sleep anyways. Glad to know he's getting some good stuff out of that!

Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
Let me know if you need more info on block nursing, and definitely update on how its going! Remember not to push your body too hard, and pump a little on the other side when you are uncomfortable instead of trying to "tough it out" if you know what I mean.
I'll try doing 4 hour chunks since less than that just doesn't seem long enough. That seems to be a good amount of time nap-wise, too - he ends up at the "end" of a breast right before sleeping which should allow him to sleep a little longer. This also makes me wonder - he sometimes sleeps for very short segments at night and maybe that is due to the same thing! We have had some (3 so far) good nights with a 4-5 hour chunk and then a 3 hour chunk as his 2 main sleep times, but most of the time we are lucky to have one chunk of sleep more than 2 1/2 hours (and most are less than 2 hours). It would be great if dealing with this makes his longer sleep chunks more consistent!

Quote:

Originally Posted by katies_mama
I have a few suggestions. Consider pumping right before you go, instead of more in advance, on one side only (maybe the same side he just nursed on, even), and only pump the milk you think dad will need, with an extra few ounces in the freezer just in case. I would just apply the theory of block feeding to pumping as well.

If you have milk saved up, you could pump an equivalent amount of foremilk, and give him the more balanced saved milk and dispose of the foremilk. If you have milk saved up and you think you can be comfortable going without pumping at all, then that might not be a bad choice either.
GREAT ideas, I definitely don't NEED to start with a full breast to pump! DOH! I need to increase my freezer supply, I only have 4 oz in there right now - DH went through a bunch recently. I'll try to do it slowly, though, so I don't confuse my body too much! I feel a little pressure to pump since my stored milk is so low. Once I have more than 12 oz or so in there, I'll try just pumping each time DH uses some of the milk.

Thanks again for the ideas!
 

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Keri, Thank you so much for chiming in here with such helpful information. I have an almost 8-week-old that is crying also when I bring her to the breast. My son never did this and I just called my LLL leader to ask about it but she did not mention oversupply as a possible cause. I also called her because my left breast was VERY tender (for the third time in eight weeks!).

Reading your post makes me realize that I started offering both breasts at every feeding, just a few days ago. I have no idea why... I will read the link at kellymom to see if that might be what's going.
 

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I have just read the information on the Kellymom page you linked us to, Keri, and this is definitely it for my poor girl. I am soooo glad I clicked on this thread. Thank you all for this important information!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
Actually, the white stripe was across my areola, so I'm not sure if that's the same thing - maybe? I read about vasospasms and that doesn't sound like what I have experienced unless it is very mild. I don't have any pain associated with the slight color change, and it's not a huge change (just lighter "milky" pink). I'll keep an eye on this, though. I do sometimes notice a similar color change when I get out of the shower (usually when I'm leaking milk, also!

I wouldn't worry about it particularly. If it isn't causing you pain, then it's not a problem!

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
Well, that's great that you were able to donate so much, though I suppose next time you won't have so much extra knowing what you do now! I wasn't too worried about having enough milk, but the pound a week thing has alleviated any potential worries about that!
I think next time I'm going to try to not pump at all next time around, except to alleviate discomfort if neccesary, and if I do, I'll integrate it into the schedule the same day I'm going somewhere, with only fourish ounces in the freezer. I very infrequently go anywhere without Katie anyway, so I assume it will be the same with any new babes. Now, when I go out, I nurse then go, and she eats solids so its not an issue. I can't remember the last time I pumped. . . and I sure don't miss it!
I'm proud of myself for pumping and donating, but I think it harmed my breastfeeding relationship and caused Katie to be extremely uncomfortable and gassy for months.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
One thing I have noticed in my experimentation today is that I kept him on one side for 4 hours and I still don't think he emptied it completely! Maybe I should pump to empty it and add that to my frozen supply? OTOH, then I might be telling my body to produce more milk... I didn't feel a need to pump any to avoid pain, but maybe it would be good to help him get some of the foremilk out of the way so he can get to the hindmilk easier? But then, pumping stimulates the breasts, kind of a catch-22.
You got it exactly, it is a catch-22. But it sounds like the block nursing will be successful for you, and relatively smooth. You're not going to see improvements on the first day, but over time, you should see some lessening of supply, and feel more empty.

In block nursing him, even though he is never nursing to empty, he IS getting hindmilk. Here is a nice explanation. http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/fo...-hindmilk.html Eventually, as you continue to block nurse, you will nurse to empty--that's how you'll be able to tell that it is working. Don't worry that he is not getting the hindmilk that he needs. In nursing him this way, he is getting more hindmilk than ever before, and he was healthy and thriving yesterday and last week when he was getting less, right? Think of it as a gradual process. Pumping will only slow down your progress. Pump if you need to only for your own comfort, and be reassured that he is getting the calories and fat he needs, and over time, the balance will be perfect as your supply regulates.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
I'll try doing 4 hour chunks since less than that just doesn't seem long enough. That seems to be a good amount of time nap-wise, too - he ends up at the "end" of a breast right before sleeping which should allow him to sleep a little longer. This also makes me wonder - he sometimes sleeps for very short segments at night and maybe that is due to the same thing! We have had some (3 so far) good nights with a 4-5 hour chunk and then a 3 hour chunk as his 2 main sleep times, but most of the time we are lucky to have one chunk of sleep more than 2 1/2 hours (and most are less than 2 hours). It would be great if dealing with this makes his longer sleep chunks more consistent!
It sounds like you're following your instincts with this and that's perfect! As far as sleep time goes, the "normal" breastfed baby can vary tremendously no matter what they are eating. If he is more comfortable and less gassy, it may improve his sleep. But if it doesn't, it doesn't mean this isn't working for him, know what I mean? You'll have a lot of mamas on MDC who can tell you that their breastfed on demand babies and toddlers never sleep more than 2 or 3 hours, and that is a very normal, healthy breastfed baby pattern---and then there are some that do sleep more, and that is also normal and healthy! My personal experience is that when Katie was younger, she slept quite well, and went through a period at 4 to 6 months old where she only woke once a night. Now, at 16mo, I consider only waking to nurse three times a good night! But, I'm really okay with that. I got into the groove of it and don't feel so sleep deprived anymore. For me, this happened when she was about 11mo, and of course cosleeping does wonders.

Quote:

Originally Posted by L'lee
GREAT ideas, I definitely don't NEED to start with a full breast to pump! DOH! I need to increase my freezer supply, I only have 4 oz in there right now - DH went through a bunch recently. I'll try to do it slowly, though, so I don't confuse my body too much! I feel a little pressure to pump since my stored milk is so low. Once I have more than 12 oz or so in there, I'll try just pumping each time DH uses some of the milk.
Thanks again for the ideas!

You should do what makes you comfortable. It is hard to be uneasy with a lack of freezer supply. But for now, I'd recommend doing the bare minimum.

And you're welcome. I've had fun talking to you! LolaK emailed me the thread, actually, and asked me to help out--so it's really because of her that I am here at all
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by luv2eatamango
I have just read the information on the Kellymom page you linked us to, Keri, and this is definitely it for my poor girl. I am soooo glad I clicked on this thread. Thank you all for this important information!
Hi Marta! I'm glad that this information helped you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I figured I'd submit an update, in case people have this same problem in the future and want to know what happened...

After about a week of block nursing, I noticed a difference, and I noticed that DS was actually emptying my breasts by the time he went to bed! At 2 weeks later, we are doing pretty well. DS still sometimes refuses to nurse when he's obviously hungry, and I have discovered that sometimes If I take him in the bedroom and lie down with him, he will eat there happily. Not sure that this has anything to do with the overproduction, but it may, since he can dribble milk onto the bed if it is coming out too fast (I have a rubberized waterproof pad under us so that I can save the sheets from having to be changed all of the time.) His poops are much more solid, and often darker than they were before, I guess I'd call them light brown in color - sometimes more yellow or some green, too, but mostly light brown and thicker than before. My breasts are somewhat engorged in the morning, but nothing like they were before. I only had to express milk a couple of times, and mostly because DS was having trouble latching, not out of my own discomfort (I tend to leak before reaching that point, anyways). I am hoping to get DS weighed this week since he is 3 mos as of Wed, so I'll get to see if he has slowed down in the weight gain - I suspect he has, and maybe that was actually the cause of the overproduction - he was trying to slow down and then wasn't eating enough to get the hindmilk. I think he also wants to suck more than he needs to to eat, so I am hoping that he is able to find that thumb soon!
 

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I'm so glad I found this thread - not for me, but for a fellow LLL mom. She asked about greenish stools at our last meeting, and nobody had a good answer for her...she also mentioned her oversupply problem later, but nobody apparently knew they could be connected - thanks! I sent this thread along to her & my LLL leader, too.
 

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I also had oversupply issue and one sided feedings saved me.
I also found another source of fussing at the breast was that my baby needed to burp. Sometimes I would forget about that.
 
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