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I just don't know how to get my ds to do his Saxon Math quicker. He has been doing Saxon math for 4 years now. He was in school up till Oct. I pulled him out at the beginning of the month. He has been taking longer and longer to do his math. He HAS TO DO IT EVERY DAY. He is needs the repetition or else he forgets it. In school he would do the math in the short period the teacher gave. He would get a hw sheet with as many as 20 or more problems and do them in 30 minutes when he came home. How he sits and daydreams, goes to the bathroom, or simply leaves his work to play. Now I am all for my ds being self motivated and choosing when to complete his work, but this is not what is happening.<br><br>
It seems like he thinks that if he takes his time on math, then he won't have to do the rest of his work, because the day is almost over and he knows I am to tired to keep on top of him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Really, what should i do? He can't just do math every day and that is it. I give him only about 2 hours of work every day. He will spend 2 hours alone on the math! Does anyone else have/had this problem? I have tried a timer, rewards for finishing quick. NOTHING works. Does he really need the peer pressure of other children, for him to do his work in a timely manner?<br>
UGG! So frustrated. I want so bad to do fun things, like lapbooking and unit studies, but we can't even finish ONE subject in one day.<br>
Robin
 

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Maybe he needs to deschool. You pulled him out in October? Did you do anything to decompress (AKA do nothing for a while <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> or go on fun field trips, or bake cookies, build a birdhouse...) or did you guys just jump into doing school at home right away?
 

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Have you considered changing to another curriculum? If he forgets so easily, maybe Saxon doesn't take the right approach for him.<br><br>
ZM
 

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We've taken to alternating. My 8yo is working with MUS, and right now he does about 3 pages a week. The other days we reinforce the same concepts with games and activities (like, figuring out how much pancake mix is needed when your only two devices are a 1 cup measure and a TBSP measure, and you also need to half the fraction)<br><br>
He remembers the concepts better this way, I found, since it actually applies to what he's doing.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>robin4kids</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9899520"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Now I am all for my ds being self motivated and choosing when to complete his work, but this is not what is happening.</div>
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I'm not surprised. He just came out of a situation (school) where he had no autonomy and no need to be self-motivated. He was told what to do and when and what his punishment would be if he didn't comply. That's not the way to build self-motivation!<br><br>
If I were you, I would chuck math for a few weeks. No one will die and you will avoid this power struggle. After that I would back off of doing it every day, or let him do half a lesson a day. And I would try going with more of a weekly to-do list than a daily to-do list. If you want him to be self-motivated and responsible, then he needs the opportunity to develop and practice those skills.<br><br>
The beauty of homeschooling is that you don't have to do it like the schools do. You can try different approaches and find ways that work for your child. I don't think you need peers to motivate kids. I think you need things that are important to them to motivate them. How motivated would you be to do 27 Saxon math problems? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
dm
 

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<span>I think the first thing to consider is that most of us have found that just about every child seems to need some serious decompression/deschooling time after leaving school. If he just came home in October, he hasn't had that. Here's a thread that leads to links that have good reading on that:<br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=417993" target="_blank">Decompression/Deschooling</a><br><br>
The story you tell is a very common one. Children outside of the school pressure cooker do tend to drag their feet when they hate something, and it's not even necessarily a question of them thinking that they'll get away with not doing it if they stall, so much as just feeling deflated. But at his stage - coming right out of school, especially if he's had negative experiences there, it's likely that nothing is going to feel like fun yet. It will take time.<br><br>
Another thing to consider is that many children really hate Saxon math - this is something I've been hearing about for many years - and that can put a very negative feeling in their minds for math. I realize it has the repetition, but there are lots of wonderful alternatives today that are working really well for lots of people. You've probably just bought a new textbook, but honestly think it could be a good investment to just pass it on if it's not working for him. There's a math sticky at the top of this forum where people describe all the various programs they're using, and there are lots of good tips there: <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=390281" target="_blank">Let's Talk Math</a>. There are also some fabulous ideas in this thead: <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=631548" target="_blank">math games/manipulatives</a> - it even includes mention of some curricula.<br><br>
It might even seem at times as your son is not cut out for homeschooling - that he isn't going to cooperate and learn what he's going to need in order to go on successfully to other important stages of life, that that he isn't going to get into it the way you've heard of other people's kids doing. It might feel hopeless - like what were you <i>thinking</i> when you came up with the idea that you could homeschool, and ohmygosh, what now? Been there/done that. Those sentiments are what a whole lot of parents feel during the beginning with a child who's been in school for a while, especially when it's been a bad experience there - and some healthy decompression/deschooling can really alleviate a whole lot of that.<br><br>
-Lillian</span>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LilyGrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9899652"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">He remembers the concepts better this way, I found, since it actually applies to what he's doing.</div>
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<span>Yes! I was trying to think of a way to say that earlier. That's the thing - learning that happens in the context of real experience just somehow works in a different way internally. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Lillian<br></span>
 

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I have heard that Saxon does take a long time. So two hours isn't unusual. I would never use it ugg. I would look for a different programe.
 

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It sounds like the current set up isn't working, and it's time to try something else. Maybe something as simple as taking a break from math, to pick up again when he's ready. And maybe try a different math program when you do.<br><br>
If he forgets everything if he's not drilled daily, then IMO it's all a waste of time. When he's interested he'll retain information without any special effort on your part or his.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ruthla</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9904061"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If he forgets everything if he's not drilled daily, then IMO it's all a waste of time.</div>
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<span>Brilliant. That's just makes so much sense. - Lillian<br></span>
 

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27 problems seems kind of overwhelming. I make my son do between 5 and 10 problems, depending on how he seems to be understanding the concept.<br><br>
Maybe you should look at your aproach and see where you can give a little. Do the fun stuff and then just a few math problems. If you do it everyday, he'll remember it. If he knows that there are only a few, he won't shut down about the overwhelming amount of work to do. You might get more out of him with less work.<br><br>
Good luck!<br>
Lisa
 

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<span>Lisa, this took me back to when I was in the 4th grade and had a teacher who loaded us up with math homework each night. I especially remember all the "long division" and multiple digit multiplication - and it took me forever too. My father even phoned the teacher to suggest that it seemed excessive, because it was so exhausting. I've often thought that we could have learned as much by simply being shown how, and doing a few problems at a time on our own. This is what I saw with my son - that he just needed to be shown how and then to try it himself. I realize each child is different, but there are some math programs around these days that make it so much easier to take absorb. - Lillian<br></span>
 

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Sounds like he needs to deschool, probably for 3 or 4 months. (I think it's best to follow 1 month of deschooling per year of school)<br><br>
If you continue to force him to sit and do his math, I worry that he will not only hate homeschooling but he will learn to hate math and not actually learn anything but hate and bitterness towards the entire process. Doesn't sound like much fun to me!
 

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I agree with pretty much what everyone else said. I'll add that real learning happens when one is interested, focused, and open to the information. This is why he's not learning it. Also, on average focus level stays optimum for no more than 20 min. at a pop, 2 hours far and above exceed that time. His focus level may be even shorter (or could be longer, but doesn't sound like it) than that 20 min. average.<br><br>
1. It sounds like you didn't deschool or deschool long enough.<br><br>
2. It sounds like you may bennifit from deschooling yourself.<br><br>
3. It sounds like Saxon isn't the answer for his learning style.<br><br>
Personally as a btdt (pulled our oldest from ps at 11 faced similar issues you are facing), deschool, or re-deschool the whole family, not just the child in question, when you are certain that is done and you still wish for a school at home, deschool some more <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">, no really.<br><br>
Schooling is someone else feeding and deciding for another what, when, how, why and how much is enough information. If that is your goal, you are in for a long haul.<br><br>
The joy of hsing is that your family's education is flexible and is suitable for each individual in the family. NOt everyone learns the same way and can retain as others deem it ought be done.<br><br>
Remember, your child's education isn't about you, it's about him/her. It works best if you support him/her as he/she best learns, not how, what, when, where and why you think it ought to be.<br><br>
How do you learn best? When you are interested in something and it keeps your interest. You find ways that keep your interest while you are learning a topic of interest. If you find something not so interesting, you toss it aside and find a better option to keep your interest up. Why do we expect any less from our children, they are people with their own ideas of interesting and interest perking styles, topics, and ways of doing things. Anything can be fun, exciting and interesting, it's just a matter of finding a way that makes it click for someone.
 

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Robin, how are you doing with this?
 
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