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i've posted here before that i'm not going to worry about her because she seems very normal. she gestures a lot and communicates with us totally. it's just that her vocabulary is not as extensive as a lot of other kids. she says "yes" a lot and the usual "momma" "dad" and a few others. she is picking up words but mispronounces a lot. lately when i read her a book i leave off the last word on a page, and she fills it in. does this sound normal to you?<br><br>
my mother has been nagging me about it. she started nagging awhile ago that the TV would teach the baby to talk. i held off and held off, finally around 18 months i started letting her watch Mickey Mouse Club (my husband had a lot to do with it, he really wanted her to watch TV, too). a word of warning to others: a little TV is a slipperly slope, but that's off topic.<br><br>
whenever i've discussed this with others, i get a litany of questions, ranging from is her hearing OK (yes) to do you talk to her throughout the day (yes, of course). it's kind of hard on me. any BTDT advice?
 

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Your daughter sounds a lot like mine at that age. Now, at 27 months, she speaks full sentences and can read the English and Arabic alphabet. She had a major language explosion just after she turned two. I was getting a little worried about her but things turned out just fine and she communicates beautifully in a verbal way now.<br><br>
The mispronouncing is totally normal and should resolve eventually.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> Sounds like she might be talking more than my 25 month old. I just produce late talkers <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I also have a 4yo who really hasn't stopped talking since she took off with it around 2.5. Seriously.Will.Not.Stop. And I know that very very soon it will be two of them constantly chattering away <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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my son is 21 months old (5/24/06) and i am also concerned about his speech. i have a first steps (our public intervention) assessment scheduled just to see what they say. every state has something like this, they have different names though, if you are very worried.
 

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i was so relieved to see this topic posted! my son is going to be 2 on sunday, and is taking his sweet time getting beyond "mama", "dada", and "yeah". i know everything happens in it's own time, but it gets kind of frustrating that he still screams at me to let me know that he needs something. we speak to him very clearly, read to him, and even sing to him. at least i know we're not alone in this matter.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ElliesMomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10702375"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">it's just that her vocabulary is not as extensive as a lot of other kids. she says "yes" a lot and the usual "momma" "dad" and a few others. she is picking up words but mispronounces a lot. lately when i read her a book i leave off the last word on a page, and she fills it in. does this sound normal to you?</div>
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Yes. I teach this subject, and she sounds completely typical to me.<br><br>
How many words does she have? Take a notebook and make a list over the course of a week. If it's more than 10 but fewer than 30, I'd take a "wait and see" approach. If she doesn't seem to be learning a lot of new words in the next 2-3 months, I'd have her evaluated. If it's more than 30 and less than 50, I'd keep an eye on how many new words she's learning, but not worry. If it's more than 50, I wouldn't worry at all. If it's fewer than 10, I'd worry.<br><br>
When you count words include:<br>
sound effects (vroom, moo)<br>
words that aren't correctly pronounced, but are relatively consistent (my ds' word for garbage truck at this age was 'gagaga')<br>
and of course, words that are pronounced correctly.<br><br>
To the other posters who are worried: If your child is 2 and has only 3 words, it's time for an evaluation. Contact early intervention services (Early Intervention, Birth to 3, First Steps are all common names). Contact your school district and they can direct you.<br><br>
Essentially we are looking for about 10 words by 18 months and 50-100 words by 24 months. Two word phrases 'should' begin by 26 months. Before about 2 1/2 we're not so worried about pronunciation. Family should be able to understand about 50% at age 2, 75% at age 3.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10702938"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Essentially we are looking for about 10 words by 18 months and 50-100 words by 24 months. Two word phrases 'should' begin by 26 months. Before about 2 1/2 we're not so worried about pronunciation. Family should be able to understand about 50% at age 2, 75% at age 3.</div>
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What if your 25 month old was understood by family about 10-15% of the time and was becoming frustrated by your inability to understand his desires? That's my ds. I think his vocabulary is within range (probably 20-30) and he started occasionally combining two words just this past weekend. It's the frustration (b/c it takes us so long to figure out what he wants) that bothers me. I mentioned this to our doctor at a 2 year visit and he recommended a hearing exam by a pediatric audiologist, does that sound right? He said First Steps wouldn't want to see him until they knew if there was a hearing issue.<br><br>
Also, my husband required speech therapy up until the middle of elementary school - are there genetic links to this sort of issue?
 

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I didn't talk much until over 2 years old. My grandma was worried I was deaf. It was only mama, dada, train, moon...no phrases or two words together.<br><br>
Then one day my mom said everything turned into "Mama, can I have a cookie please?" and "I am going to read a book now." I have always been grammar obsessed, and we joke that I wasn't going to talk until I could do it correctly.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>april77</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10703274"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What if your 25 month old was understood by family about 10-15% of the time and <i><b>was becoming frustrated by your inability to understand his desires?</b></i> That's my ds. I think his vocabulary is within range (probably 20-30) and he started occasionally combining two words just this past weekend. It's the frustration (b/c it takes us so long to figure out what he wants) that bothers me. I mentioned this to our doctor at a 2 year visit and he recommended a hearing exam by a pediatric audiologist, does that sound right? He said First Steps wouldn't want to see him until they knew if there was a hearing issue.<br><br>
Also, my husband required speech therapy up until the middle of elementary school - are there genetic links to this sort of issue?</div>
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The bold is mine -- if a child is becoming frustrated by his inability to communicate/my inability to understand, I think an evaluation is in order. A hearing test is the first step, and then an eval by a speech language pathologist.<br><br>
Language delays/disorders do run in families, so it's possible that your son is more at risk for issues because your dh was. But a lot of it depends on why your dh was in therapy -- was it one or two sounds, or a larger range of things.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sk8ermaiden</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10703532"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I didn't talk much until over 2 years old. My grandma was worried I was deaf. It was only mama, dada, train, moon...no phrases or two words together.<br><br>
Then one day my mom said everything turned into "Mama, can I have a cookie please?" and "I am going to read a book now." I have always been grammar obsessed, and we joke that I wasn't going to talk until I could do it correctly.</div>
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That's exactly what my little brother was like. He was almost 3 and not talking at all. My parents were starting to consider getting him evaluated, then he started talking in full sentences. We always said the same thing -- he was just a perfectionist and didn't want to monkey around with this experimental baby-talk stuff. He wanted to wait until he had it ALL figured out first.<br><br>
Now my DS was an early talker, but DD is now nearly 15mo and has not a single word yet, no sound effects, no mispronounciations, no 'mama'. She has quite a few signs now, thankfully, but she was even later than "average" for that.<br><br>
We're not worried. Her dad was a late talker (14-15mo he started) and of course, there's my brother as an example.<br><br>
This is SUCH a common concern on this board. I wish the common-knowledge guidelines were more accurate about the NORMAL range of speech development.
 

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Early intervention is free. They come to your house, do an evaluation that is play for your baby and help figure out if your baby has a delay or not. We did this for our son at 8 months. Before they come to the house they ask some questions on the phone to see if it is possible your baby is delayed or not. If your baby does have a delay (our son did) the therapist comes to your house and teaches you how to play with your baby so that it gets the therapy it needs. All of this is free.<br><br>
If you have concerns, I'd call your local early intervention center. If they have concerns they'll come out. If they're not concerned, it was just a phone call and you can rest easy.<br><br>
My understanding is babies cannot learn language from TV. To them a TV is just noise. They need the interactions between them and a real person to learn language. Studies are showing language delays in babies who were sat in front of the Einstein or similar videos that are supposedly meant to teach language.<br><br>
Here is an article about TV in children under 2:<br><a href="http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/217262" target="_blank">http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/217262</a><br><br>
Since you now have to sign in (for free) to read the story, here is the part that is most applicable to this thread:<br><br>
"Too much TV is bad for all ages, from preschoolers to old couch potatoes, but in children younger than 2, TV actually can change the structure of their brain in troubling ways.<br>
The wiring of the developing brain starts at the back where vision is processed and proceeds to the front of the brain where the frontal lobes are. These big frontal lobes are where we store working memory, the memory we hold long enough to finish a task like dialing a new phone number. Young babies aren't wired to do this yet, so when they watch television, every sound bite is like a new story. So what, you might ask? Well, what happens is the baby's brain gets wired up for short-attention-span use.<br>
Hmmm, what disorder characterized by attention problems are we seeing in increasing numbers in children? That's right, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The data are not yet in that can prove early TV causes ADHD, but one study showed that for every hour per day of TV watched before age 3, the child is 10 percent more likely to have ADHD symptoms by age 7.<br>
If I had a baby younger than 2, I would follow the AAP guidelines and avoid television like the plague."
 

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your child speaks way more than my 21 month old. Her vocab is mamma/papa/hannah/mikah/baby<br>
she signs a few words but that is it.She grunts alot<br><br>
no one seems worried though<br><br>
nak
 

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Post 8 on this thread has some good info on this subject!<br><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=836598" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=836598</a>
 

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All of my kids have been late talkers, my son especially seems to be later. Though he clearly has understood us from very early on 14 months or so....and he DRIVES me bonkers with his unfortunate understanding of how to undo everything and get through all the child safety locks....so I'm not worried about his lack of language use. Of course, he uses signs, and has the ability to get his needs understood.<br><br>
(another discussion entirely, we're thinking he's fairly mechanically minded at this point...my second DD is like this as well, it may come from me)
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Essentially we are looking for about 10 words by 18 months and 50-100 words by 24 months.</td>
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Well crap, my 17 1/2 month old has 2 "sort of" words. "Keee" for Kitty and "Dit-do" for diaper.
 

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Wow, this makes me feel much better! My 20 month old has said several things, but not regularly. Right now he pretty much says mama, dada, Dayday, sit and up. He did put a couple words together in the last few days but that's it.
 

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I just went ahead and had the eval with my then 20 month old. Now I have something to tell his ped and others who are so worried about it.<br><br>
He only had a few words but I knew his receptive language was good, his dad didn't talk until he was over 3 yo, I was sure his hearing was fine, etc. Even with his less than 5 words he tested at 19 months which = 5% delay which isn't even statistically significant. He has a few more words now but will not be anywhere near 50-100 by 2 yo. The speech therapist said that is fine and she isn't concerned about him catching up in time.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10704006"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The bold is mine -- if a child is becoming frustrated by his inability to communicate/my inability to understand, I think an evaluation is in order. A hearing test is the first step, and then an eval by a speech language pathologist.<br>
Language delays/disorders do run in families, so it's possible that your son is more at risk for issues because your dh was. But a lot of it depends on why your dh was in therapy -- was it one or two sounds, or a larger range of things.</div>
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Thanks!! We got lucky and the audiologist had a cancellation this morning. She said his ears are filled with fluid - he failed the vibration test and she said the the sound booth test results went along with the fluid issue. We're going back in 6 weeks to see if the fluid drains on its own and she went ahead and gave us a First Steps referral, just to see how far behind he is on language. She said with the possible hearing issues she would rather get the speech evaluated ASAP.
 

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Definatly make a list. I <i>thought</i> that ds only had about 10-15 words but when I wrote them all down, it turned out he has about 60 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
I wasn't really that worried, but now I'm even less worried <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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my 21 month old JUST started saying mama dada and a handful of other words but no more than 15 words and thats pushing it, she is in Early intervention- they give me some good ideas to help promote learning, and its nice that they come right to your house.<br><br><br>
Okay i just made a list she says 11 word and does 13 signs ( but usually only when promted) only does 3-4 signs w/ o being promted
 
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