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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dd is 23 mo's and knows her letters and letter sounds. She'll frequently find a letter, say its sound and name something that begins with it. She sounded out BAT and CAT when she saw them on a leapfrog box in a store.<br><br>
So.. is there any downside to helping her learn to read at this age? OH, she also pretends to read, and has several books she's memorized and "reads" to us. She can also read Yes, No and her name.<br><br>
Thanks for your input.
 

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Sounds like she's on her way already. I'm not sure that you can stop her.<br><br>
Most very young children who read are sight readers (i.e. they memorize books and thus learn a lot of words they recognize by sight). They tend to infer phonics from that.<br><br>
I'd keep reading with her and follow her lead. Talk about letter sounds, point out oddities like ("S and h together usually say shh....; a can say a like apple but sometimes says a like ate or ah like father) when she encounters them. Occasionally model sounding out simple words, if you want. It certainly won't hurt her. I wouldn't sit her down with 100 Easy Lessons though.
 

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I wanted to read at 20 months. my mother actively refused to teach me; she'd taught my older brother how to read and been chastised thoroughly by teachers for dooming him to be "bored in first grade." For my second birthday, she bought me a set of blocks, from which I learned my letters and their sounds within days. A month later, I was reading independantly and mom gave up and brought my older brother's books down from the attic. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
No, there's absolutely no downside to helping a kid read at 23 months. If you work to prevent it, however, you'll likely breed resentment. If you don't do anything, you'll probably feel a little guilty later but you're unlikely to do any lasting damage. The best course of action is probably to follow her lead. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Sounds like she is all ready teaching herself! My ds1 read around age 2. Once they start you really can't stop them! These are the type of children who read cereal boxes at breakfast just because they like to read. I can't really think of a downside to it, although there may be one.
 

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Find a good library. Have fun. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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We've had versions of this same thread before so you may want to search back a bit.<br><br>
The potential downside I see is if you become invested in her progress and she starts to sense your frustration if it doesn't go as quickly as you expect. Some kids learn their letters or beginning letter sounds YEARS before they are ready to learn to read. The process is really different for different kids and it can become frustrating if she expects (or you expect) it to progress to reading on a certain time table and it doesn't.<br><br>
I've known two year olds who were where you are describing and were reading well six months or a year later. A friend had a son who was similar reading a handful of words, recognizing his beginning letter sounds and at age seven still wasn't reading. I'd keep in mind that range.
 

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I don't think there's any problem with trying, but also-- what Roar said. My DD knew letters and letter sounds before 18 months and was sight-reading a bunch of words before she was two. She also has sounded out simple words from time to time. But she is almost 4 and is still not actively reading. It's sort of a mystery to us why she isn't yet, but she's not. No big thing--I think it will come very fast when it comes.
 

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Just adding my thoughts, as an early reader. If she is hardwired to be an early reader (as some kids are), you won't be able to STOP her from learning to read. She just - will. If she's not, I don't see the point in accelerating the process. It's lovely to be able to read but I do feel that my obsession with reading kind of shut out other experiences that enrich a young child's life. I am not suggesting that most early readers are missing out on something, only that it might not be preferable to actively teach a child that young to read.<br><br>
A literacy-rich environment will do all the "teaching" your dd needs, and it sounds like she already has that. She will do the rest, if she is interested.<br><br>
Also, I agree that children vary *wildly* in their paths to literacy. My dd has known her letters and most of the sounds they make for a long time, and yet I would estimate that she is still years away from truly reading. Unlike your dd, she has no interest in sounding out words, although she sometimes wants to "guess" a word based on its first letter (she has memorized that Nora begins with N, Daddy begins with D, etc.) Whereas there are kids of her age who really are well on their way to true reading.<br><br>
Whichever it is, it is fine, and they will get to the destination on their own timetable. The most important thing is how they *feel* about reading. ITA with a PP that it would be bad for you to show your dd that you are somehow invested in her learning to read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your thoughts. I really appreciate it. I guess I'll just take her lead and see whether it's a year from now or 3 or 4 when she starts to read.
 

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I agree with Roar. Our DS's reading skills advance in fits and starts with months of stagnation (or even regression) in-between. We're teaching him since he wants to learn but I'm not holding my breath. This is the same kid who potty-trained at 2 and then went right back to diapers. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
My mother didn't teach me to read since everybody warned her that that would make 1st grade boring for me. It didn't help. I learned to read in 2 weeks and then the rest of 1st grade was <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/sleeping.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="sleeping">.
 

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I'm not a regular poster, but like others said you won't be able to stop her. I wouldn't teach dd how to read when sge asked a the age of 3, but by 3.5 she was reading. I got criticized for "pushing" her and I just laughed and told them she taught herself.<br><br>
I always read that there are the above average who are taught and the gifted who teach themselves. In this instance dd was gifted in reading. She's five now and it's a challenge finding books for her to read that are challenging in reading skills, but still age appropriate.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mom2reenie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9873123"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I always read that there are the above average who are taught and the gifted who teach themselves.</div>
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This is incorrect. Some gifted kids teach themselves, while others require varying levels of instruction. Reading is only one facet.<br><br>
OP, I think if your child is interested, follow her lead and provide some guidance. I'll ditto previous posters who indicated that the road each child takes is their own, and may be shorter or longer than we anticipate.
 
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