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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just had my second trimester scan at 25 weeks (little late, I know), and they said I had complete placenta previa. Knowing someone who had this before, I was already aware of what I may be in for. The doctor didn't seem to indicate that there was much of a chance of it moving out of the way enough for me to avoid a c-section, and I'll go back at 32 weeks for a recheck and then we'll go from there. Seeing as I was using a midwife, she correctly assumed I was going for a natural delivery, she did tell me that I needed to prepare myself for a c-section.

But now I'm not sure where to go from here. I was about to hire our doula (she just called me back yesterday to confirm she could take us and I just hadn't been able to call her back yet) and signing us up for a natural birth class is at the top of my to-do list. But, should I be going the c-section route, I won't really need those things. I certainly want to remain hopeful that it may change by 32 weeks, but at the same point in time, I don't want to proceed with these things only to not need them.

Anyone have experience with this? Thoughts? Advice? I'm really not sure what to do.
 

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Did the doctor give you any sense of how closely the placenta was centered on the cervix? That might help you think through probabilities more clearly.

My concern about the natural birth classes isn't that the information on natural birth will necessarily be useless, but the class I took in my non-previa pregnancy was really negative about birth interventions. IVs were bad, hospital johnnys were meh at best, npo orders were evil, and c-sections were treated like a personal and moral failing. This kind of thing is never really good, but if you know you have a potentially serious complication, it's a whole head trip that will screw with you bad. But the breathing, relaxation, counterpressure, visualization, and hanging out with other pregnant women would be great. I don't know what the middle ground is. I did not find it while i had previa, and have not stumbled on it since.

But you know what I would have loved to have? An understanding doula. Someone i had met before to tell me it was very likely I'd be having a c-section tonight (it was obvious to everyone but me). Someone to hold my hand after dh went to the NICU. Someone to bring me cell phone pics of the baby while I was in recovery. Someone to get a wheelchair from the nurse's station in post-partum and wheel me to the NICU even when the nurses were busy. Someone to help me hook up the industrial breast pump, and move recliner chairs around the NICU, and tell the cleaning staff not to bug me when I was napping. Can your doula sign on for that? If so, she would be very well worth having.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MeepyCat, it's pretty much dead center, so that's why I think she wanted me to prepare for the likely fact that it won't move enough to avoid a c-section.

I was doing the birth class more for the second part of what you mentioned. :) I understand that at certain times, medical intervention is necessary, and that's fine with me, as long as it's really needed. Sadly though, I know that many times procedures could have been avoided if they just let nature take it's course, and that's more what I'm trying to avoid.

And I have my mom, who is going to be present, as long as she is allowed to be, so I think she could kind do many of the things you mentioned, but that is a good thought, as I had not thought of those things.
 

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I was diagnosed with a complete previa with twin A this pregnancy at 20 weeks. I was also told mine was less likely to move, because of being a twin. I was really bummed, but kept positive, and it helped to have an excellent trust relationship with my OB, because I know if I need a section, I actually NEED one.

Anyway, at my ultrasound a couple of weeks ago (growth scan and to check placental position) it had moved FAR away from the cervix, and kind of surprised us all. My OB has cleared me for another VBA2C, as long as baby A stays head down.

It can happen, and as MeepyCat stated, it has a lot to do with the position/placement to begin with. If it's complete because it's sitting as a bowl above the cervix, it is less likely to move. If it extends all the way over the cervix, it will still be classified as a previa, even if it's just one of the far ends that covers: and that scenario is more likely to move up and away. Mine was a posterior placement, with the entire frontal portion covering like a bowl, but still attached to the back if that makes sense.

I really think her suggestions about a doula are wonderful ones. As a mama who has had several differing birth experiences, two of c-sections (one due to transverse lie and another unnecessary repeat due to a hospital VBAC ban), I can tell you that it could make all the difference in the world to your birth experience!

Hoping things go well for you!
 

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I was diagnosed with a complete previa with twin A this pregnancy at 20 weeks. I was also told mine was less likely to move, because of being a twin. I was really bummed, but kept positive, and it helped to have an excellent trust relationship with my OB, because I know if I need a section, I actually NEED one.

Anyway, at my ultrasound a couple of weeks ago (growth scan and to check placental position) it had moved FAR away from the cervix, and kind of surprised us all. My OB has cleared me for another VBA2C, as long as baby A stays head down.

It can happen, and as MeepyCat stated, it has a lot to do with the position/placement to begin with. If it's complete because it's sitting as a bowl above the cervix, it is less likely to move. If it extends all the way over the cervix, it will still be classified as a previa, even if it's just one of the far ends that covers: and that scenario is more likely to move up and away. Mine was a posterior placement, with the entire frontal portion covering like a bowl, but still attached to the back if that makes sense.

I really think her suggestions about a doula are wonderful ones. As a mama who has had several differing birth experiences, two of c-sections (one due to transverse lie and another unnecessary repeat due to a hospital VBAC ban), I can tell you that it could make all the difference in the world to your birth experience!

Hoping things go well for you!
You have no idea how much hope this post has given me. I was just now praying to have faith that my placenta (also posterior) could move a lot... Mine sounds positioned just like yours was and all I have read is that those are much less likely to move. I was diagnosed at 22 weeks. How many weeks were you at the most recent check? Baby #9 and my first complication. <3 Seriously. Thank you
 

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Never give up hope!!!

I think I was 24 or 25 weeks when we found it had moved. My OB just did a really fast in office looksie a week ago, to ensure babies had enough fluid, and I would have been 33 1/2 weeks, and the placenta is way out of the way, and posterior.

I know it is difficult experiencing something like this..I know you have a lot of children, and therefore the gravity of what a c-section means for recovery with children and possible impact on future fertility/birth is a BIG deal . Well, I won't put words in your mouth, but those are my concerns ;)

I will pray that your placenta moves clear out of the way so you have nothing impeding a natural vaginal birth!

Blessings!
 

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Never give up hope!!!

I think I was 24 or 25 weeks when we found it had moved. My OB just did a really fast in office looksie a week ago, to ensure babies had enough fluid, and I would have been 33 1/2 weeks, and the placenta is way out of the way, and posterior.

I know it is difficult experiencing something like this..I know you have a lot of children, and therefore the gravity of what a c-section means for recovery with children and possible impact on future fertility/birth is a BIG deal . Well, I won't put words in your mouth, but those are my concerns ;)

I will pray that your placenta moves clear out of the way so you have nothing impeding a natural vaginal birth!

Blessings!
Thank you! And yes... those are real concerns. You likely understand better than most. ;) I appreciate the prayers.
 

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I had previa with my last pregnancy, though I'm not sure the severity. The ultrasound technician neglected to take the measurement, so I just went for the follow up appointment that was needed regardless. It did move out of the way, and I was able to have a completely natural birth.

Less likely doesn't mean impossible. Don't give up until the ship has sailed. Just be upfront with your doula in your consultation interview. Ask her what she can and is willing to do in her role given the circumstances. Mine wouldn't have done what a previous poster described, that's family's responsibility, but that doesn't mean yours won't. Also ask her what her refund policy is. Perhaps you could hire her, and if things are still looking sour by your 32 week follow up you could be refunded for services not rendered.
 

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ust be upfront with your doula in your consultation interview. Ask her what she can and is willing to do in her role given the circumstances. Mine wouldn't have done what a previous poster described, that's family's responsibility
That's a giant bummer. Having a doula refer to certain parts of supporting a new mom as "family's responsibility" is really disheartening - after all, supporting a woman through labor could be considered a family's responsibility. Not everyone has family available to do this stuff, or is comfortable with the family they have doing it.
 

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Meepycat that's my definition of a family's responsibilities, and not my doula's words. She wouldn't act as a replacement for the family unless nobody was there. I don't see that as disappointing at all. I believe it's respectful. A doula's job is not to replace your family or care providers. Some of the things noted should also be done by your care provider. That's why I suggested talking about it. I don't know who is going to be there for the original poster's delivery.
 

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I had complete placenta previa and mine moved out of the way and I was able to have a vaginal birth. I would recommend going ahead with hiring the doula and attending the birth classes. I think it is best to be prepared for anything. A doula can attend a c-section birth with you. Many hospitals will only allow 1 person in the operating room at a time so your partner can be there for the birth and if the baby is taken to the nursery, they can go with the baby and the doula can come in to be with you while they finish up and when you go to recovery. The doula can help you get started with breastfeeding and also generally keep you calm as you go through the whole process.
I know a couple who was told the woman would need a c-section due to placenta previa so they stopped going to childbirth classes. When they went in for 1 last ultrasound before the birth, the technician saw there was no placenta previa so they went ahead with a vaginal birth. The last minute change and lack of preparation really threw them off and they didn't have the kind of birth they wanted so that's why I say it's best to prepare for anything. Good luck!
 

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Meepycat that's my definition of a family's responsibilities, and not my doula's words. She wouldn't act as a replacement for the family unless nobody was there. I don't see that as disappointing at all. I believe it's respectful. A doula's job is not to replace your family or care providers. Some of the things noted should also be done by your care provider. That's why I suggested talking about it. I don't know who is going to be there for the original poster's delivery.
Families are not all the same, and their needs aren't either. There were many situations surrounding my daughter's birth where my husband and I had no choice but to leave one of us twisting in the wind - DH almost missed the birth because he had to stay with our son and wait for a sitter, no one recapped DD's immediate post-partum medical care for me until she'd been in the hospital for over a week, there was no one who could update me while I was in surgical recovery because dh was in the NICU, holding down that foet. friends and family were available in the evening, and the day shift nurses were too busy to take me upstairs to the NICU. Suggesting that new parents shouldn't need help is a poor way to respect them.
 

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Families are not all the same, and their needs aren't either. There were many situations surrounding my daughter's birth where my husband and I had no choice but to leave one of us twisting in the wind - DH almost missed the birth because he had to stay with our son and wait for a sitter, no one recapped DD's immediate post-partum medical care for me until she'd been in the hospital for over a week, there was no one who could update me while I was in surgical recovery because dh was in the NICU, holding down that foet. friends and family were available in the evening, and the day shift nurses were too busy to take me upstairs to the NICU. Suggesting that new parents shouldn't need help is a poor way to respect them.
I think you are missing the entire point of my posts, because I'm largely agreeing with what you're saying. My advice to the OP was to speak with her doula & see what she could do, and I implied (using my situation as an example) that circumstances may be different. If that doesn't clarify for you I'm honestly at a loss...
 
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