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I was talking with another mama today and about our kids that are about 27 months old now. She was telling me she was a little concerned about her DS not always getting the color right when they asked him to identify different colors. Often he says things are blue or yellow. With my DD she doesn't always get it right either, but I get mixed responses. Sometimes I think she really does know her colors and then other times it seems she doesn't. Sometimes I think she just doesn't want to "perform" either when I prompt her.

How early can you tell if someone is color-blind and at this age how often should a child be identifying the right color anyway?
 

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Sounds way too early to worry about it. Most of the time my 30 month old can pick out the red block or the blue block if I ask him to, but the other way around, asking him to tell me what color a block is when pointing to it, is hit or miss.
 

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My husband is color blind (red/green) and his parents didn't know till he was about seven or maybe older. They just thought he couldn't get the hang of identifing colors.
My dd is 27 mos too and she knows all her colors, but I'm not sure if that's a reasonable expectation universally. I think that's just her intrest. But for some reason I was told that if it was genetic it's only boys that have it. So I never worried about it. But still, I'd tell her to give it a while longer before she worries. And if he is color blind, no biggie, he's just colorblind.
 

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I think color blindness is only red-green confusion. I would guess that it's still early. I know of some 3 yr olds who don't know their colors, and I know of some kids who knew them at 18 mo. It really varies like any other skill.

With DS, I know one day he just got it. I noticed he was matching objects based on color, and he could tell me their name 100% of the time.
 

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My DS is 27 months and knows his colors, and will tell you what color something is when asked, but his speech suffers in other ways and I don't think he's typical. For example, he'll want something that's on top of the fridge, but can't tell me what. But I can ask him what color it is, and he's say "OOnph" which means the orange object. And his pronunciation is adorably off. Red is "hair", Blue is "beeyoo", Green is "geem", yellow is "oh-yee", brown is "bowm", white is "hot", black is "cack", orange is "oonph", purple is "pur", and pink is pink!
If you ask him about something that is a tangerine color, he will tell you it's yellow and orange.

I don't think colors are typical at all at this age though. I would not worry about colorblindness. As I recall some kids learn the colors in kindegarten.
 

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My dd is 28 months, and has been consistently identifying colours for a very long time, and has consistently said the colour names for at least 4 months now. I have no idea what the average is though/
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MotherWhimsey
My husband is color blind (red/green) and his parents didn't know till he was about seven or maybe older. They just thought he couldn't get the hang of identifing colors.
My dd is 27 mos too and she knows all her colors, but I'm not sure if that's a reasonable expectation universally. I think that's just her intrest. But for some reason I was told that if it was genetic it's only boys that have it. So I never worried about it. But still, I'd tell her to give it a while longer before she worries. And if he is color blind, no biggie, he's just colorblind.
Because colorblindness is recessive, and is carried on the X chromosome, men are much more likely to get it.
Essentially, your DH has an X and a Y chromosome. You have XX. If you get one "bad" X chromosome with the colorblindness gene, and one "good" one, the good one will override it. You will not be colorblind but you will be a carrier. Since males only get one X chromosome, if it's one with the colorblindness gene, there is no other X chromosome to override it. So they will always be colorblind.

Assume Xis the bad chromosome.
If you (XX) and your DH (XY, have kids, here are the possible variations:
XX (Daughter, not colorblind, but a carrier.)
XY (Son, not colorblind and not a carrier.)
Since your sons can ONLY get their X genes from you, the mom, they have no chance of being colorblind.
However, your daughters will carry the gene, which would mean they could have colorblind kids.

If a female carrier (XX) and a male non-carrier (XY) have kids, they can be as follows:
XX (Daughter, carrier but not colorblind)
XX (Daughter, not a carrier)
XY (Son, not a carrier)
XY (Son, colorblind.)

If both parents carry the gene, it goes as follows:
XX (mom) and XY (dad) have:
XX (daughter, colorblind. All of her sons will be colorblind)
XX (daughter, carrier)
XY (son, colorblind)

That is a simplification of course, but hope it makes sense. Basically, in order for you to have colorblind kids, you, the mother, must carry the gene. If your DH carries the gene but you don't, your kids won't be colorblind but your grandkids might.
 

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I just read a developmental chart that said kids should know at least 1 color by name at 36 months. Having said that, my 19 month old can identify green. I also think she can identify yellow and red, but I'm not sure because it might depend on how the question is asked. Still-- I met a really smart 3 year old who didn't know her colors, but knew a whole lot of other, more important stuff-- like how to treat people and play nicely, and how to mother her dolls and smaller kids. So if you find that your child can't identify colors yet and it's important to you-- then work on it through songs and play, and see if you can bring it about. Otherwise, the knowledge will probably come in time.

Faith
 

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Thank you for this post. My son is almost 27 months and I have been wondering the same thing. He can tell the names of many colors, but evertime I show him something red he says it is blue. I was going to do some research on color blindness because I thought he would think the red was green instead of blue. Well anyways, thanks to this thread I don't think I have anything to worry about.
 

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I was just reading how colour identification at this age is not important also, and that being able to express needs is a much more useful skill.
 

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I agree that it's way too early to worry, but...mamas always worry about something!


If it's just a question of color blindness (there are different types, red-green is the most common) there is a really easy way to figure it out. Your friend can ask her ped for a pediatric test sheet, or find a site on the internet and print the sheet out on a color printer. The sheets are actually a lot of fun...often the entire page is covered with small colored circles. Some of the circles are green and others are red (same tone and intensity) with one of the colors making up an image. If the child can see the image then they are not color blind. If they only see a page of dots then more testing would be in order.

hth

edited to add= this isn't a child test, but http://www.toledo-bend.com/colorblind/Ishihara.html will give you the idea and http://colorvisiontesting.com/online%20test.htm is a bit more kid friendly
 
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