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I just wanted to start following this as this is the same issue (seriously, I could have written this post word-for-word) I'm having with my son who will be 3 in early October. I suspect in part our issue began because my husband is at home with him during the day and is a non-cooking carb junkie :(. But he literally eats the exact same foods you listed and won't eat the ones you listed :(. Just keeping an eye on this!

EDIT:
I've read the comments now and see that there are multiple who mention not worrying if they're hitting milestones. I'm not sure about the OP, but my personal main concern is the inadequate level of nutrition my child is receiving. His diet is far far from balanced and doesn't level itself off over the course of the week -- he's missing some nutrients and I can't even get him to chew a multi.
 

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I agree, just because a kid's hitting milestones doesn't mean there are no causes for concern. Malnutrition can cause a lot of problems, and if a kid isn't willing to eat a rounded diet or isn't growing, and both is worse, there's likely something very wrong. I know first-hand that you can't always realize just how much damage has been done to your health until you start fixing it and look back. There were a lot of things that we thought was just the way our baby was that turns out to have been caused by gluten. I'm darn well going to be worried about something that makes my baby suffer so much!

Your kid won't chew a multi- have you tried a liquid one? I'm lucky that kiddo has so far been willing to drink any supplement when I put it in milk, it's worth a try.
 

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I really hesitate to post this because it's so unusual and I don't want to cause fear, but my god-daughter had unexplained weight loss, refusal of food, vomiting/reflux and it turned out she had a brain tumor. The diagnoses was completely missed, because everyone was focusing on the GI issues and she was hitting milestone. A complete neuro work up and a CT scan would have caught it much earlier. Incredibly rare, but important to know about just in case.
 
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Hello everyone!

This is one thing that has been weighing on my mind for … let's see … too long now.

We had a very very rough start with solid foods with my daughter. And it just continued and continues … it's never really gotten good, just slightly better. At this point, she eats all meals a day, just usually very tiny portions and only specific things (you won't see her eating any veggies or meat - she's only into carbs and some fruit, and she loves yogurt, but doesn't really drink much milk).

On top of that, she started falling from one growth curve to another and now is at about 3% growth wise and 4% weight wise.

We've been to specialists, but the specialists fail at finding anything or finding a solution for us. Our gastroenterologist pretty much just shrugged (after a few visits and tests) and said that she will simply just be a small girl (which doesn't worry me, it's just the fact she's so darn tiny now and looks about 1-1.5 years younger than kids her age - she even hardly has any hair, still and is very pale).

I've seen two different nutritionists and those basically just told me everything I already knew and none of it helped me. In the end they prescribed my daughter some 'nutritional drinks,' which my daughter unfortunately won't drink, plus she doesn't drink smoothies, so we can't even mix it into anything.

I've been at the end of my rope with her non eating and non-growing already several times and have posted in many places, but nobody seems to have an answer for us … so I'm thinking of trying one more time here …

I wonder if any of you are struggling with a similar problem and whether you've found something that helped?

My daughter is 3 years old now (just turned) and weighs 12kg (26lbs and 7 oz) and measures only 87.5cm (c/a 2 feet and 10 inches, like an average two year old). When she was born - all the way until she was about 1 year old, she was on the 50% percentile, now she's barely on a 3rd one … :frown: I breastfed her until she was 14 months old. Exclusively only until about 10 months, then I got literally yelled at by her doctor telling me she *HAS* to eat solids now (that's pretty much when our troubles started - with stressed out me).

Any advice will be deeply appreciated.

Btw, I'm 5'3" and my husband is 6'1", so we're not exactly tiny either of us.
My 19 month old weighs around 24-25 lbs, hardly eats anything. He was 9 lbs at birth, and ever since then he has not gained too much. He is so so picky. Doesn't want meat , veggies, mainly only will eat pasta, breadsticks,cheese/ chesse sticks, some fruit( apples, sometimes cantaloupe and sonetimes banana) he likes yogurt and applesauce. Very very picky, so I feel ya. He will drink one pediasure a day, and occasionally a smoothie I make with peanut butter, banana and yogurt. I know it's frustrating. Bi make so many meals a day trying to get my little guy to eat. And I pray and pray. But he is full of energy and happy and healthy. :grin:
 

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My 19 month old weighs around 24-25 lbs, hardly eats anything. He was 9 lbs at birth, and ever since then he has not gained too much. He is so so picky. Doesn't want meat , veggies, mainly only will eat pasta, breadsticks,cheese/ chesse sticks, some fruit( apples, sometimes cantaloupe and sonetimes banana) he likes yogurt and applesauce. Very very picky, so I feel ya. He will drink one pediasure a day, and occasionally a smoothie I make with peanut butter, banana and yogurt. I know it's frustrating. Bi make so many meals a day trying to get my little guy to eat. And I pray and pray. But he is full of energy and happy and healthy. :grin:
Oh and I bfed until he was 17 months. Now he chugs whole milk.
 

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I just wanted to update this thread.

We've seen GI specialists multiple times now (three different ones within the same hospital) and an endocrinologist specialist as well.

According to the endocrinologist, DD is absolutely fine. She's small, but she is growing and she is following her own little curve. She grew even despite not gaining weight, which, according to him is a great proof that there is absolutely nothing wrong with her hormonally. He believes, however, we should have her get a gastroscopy (with a biopsy) to make sure she's not a celiac (even though the repeated blood tests are coming out negative).

The GI specialists think it's just not enough calories consumed and her being super picky. However, the nutritionist we saw said she does eat enough calories - just sometimes a little less and sometimes more than she needs, but it averages out pretty well.

So, why is she not gaining? Nobody knows.

Now, it's off to a child psychologist and hopefully to a learn-to-eat clinic.

DD is horribly picky and WON'T try new things no matter how hard I try. It's all bread, butter, cheese, yogurt, pasta and a little bit of meat thrown in there for a good measure - but mostly sausages and cold cuts and ready-made meatballs. She eats maybe one little broccoli piece a week, and that's all for veggies. Oh, yeah, she eats raisins, bananas, pears, raspberries and sometimes even apples, but that is seriously IT.

Her BMI is falling and she's starting to look skinny ... but I'm trying not to worry.

The endocrinologist said an interesting thing to me: Maybe she's taking after her great-grandmother (she's not even 150cm) - that generation didn't suffer with such prevalence with heart disease and they even ate less than we do - and they were way shorter than we are - maybe we're not supposed to stuff our children the way we do today, maybe the amount of food that your daughter eats really is enough FOR HER and she's just going to be small. There's nothing wrong with that. I'm paraphrasing here and translating from Swedish :grin:

Besides that he said that it's obvious that she's got delayed bone growth - he told me there's no need for wrist x-ray as he can just see it with his bare eyes. So it's going to be late period and longer growth period for her - she'll probably catch up with other girls growth wise in high school.
 

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Thanks for the update!

And my 8yo daughter eats fewer things than that. But she will try one crumb of something (I'm not exaggerating--one crumb), if it promises to be sweet. So as far as variety goes, that's really good for a picky 3yo.
 

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Thanks for the update!

And my 8yo daughter eats fewer things than that. But she will try one crumb of something (I'm not exaggerating--one crumb), if it promises to be sweet. So as far as variety goes, that's really good for a picky 3yo.
:yeah

Her diet doesn't sound that bad to me--she's getting carbs, dairy, meat and fruit which is pretty balanced. Sure, she could be eating better than she is, but that is true for a lot of people. I wouldn't stress so much about her lack of veggies, that is very common among little kids. You could try giving her a gummy vitamin that has veggie juice powder included or make spinach or kale smoothies (yogurt, strawberries or blueberries, a handful or two of spinach or kale, orange juice, maybe a banana and voila--these are awesome because you don't really taste nor see the greens but they are definitely there).

Again, I don't think you should worry so much, everyone grows at their own rate. I've known kids who didn't eat as much (or not as much variety) as your DD and they grew slowly, too, but in the long run they are just fine. Also, your stress about her eating could very well rub off on her, which is certainly not helpful. Healthy eating habits includes a relaxed, easygoing behavior about eating otherwise an eating disorder could manifest over time.

ETA: I just read through the rest of the comments. My advice is probably sucky then since she said she doesn't like smoothies or multi vitamins. I wish I had more advice. Also, I see that you are doing your best to be relaxed about it, but it's amazing how much kids often pick up on what we are feeling and experiencing (even if we don't say it). I would be frightened, too, if my DD was steadily losing weight. If it were my DD I would keep trying different recipes and include nutrient dense foods as much as possible. Also, the fact that the tests you've had done on her have come back negative I see as a positive sign. If she starts to have health problems due to the weight loss, like anemia, frequent colds or other illnesses, sensitivity to cold weather, etc then I would be more concerned.
 

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Wilhelmina, you mentioned celiac possibility. A friend of the family, who is a registered nurse, her husband an MD, their son was not growing well for years. It turned out he has celiac, undiagnosed all through the years despite various specialists. Finally she put two and two together, and did a food trial. I don't know many details. Now he is growing and developing better on the proper diet. The mom, the RN, also has it. She said that she never really thought twice about the gastro pain she felt after eating certain foods, she was just accustomed to it. Then she realized it was gluten. They are both gluten free now.
 

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If you have only done blood panel for celiac, it might be time for a biopsy. A negative blood test is not definitive no matter how many times you take it. A positive blood test can be considered definitive, though following up at that point could be a good idea.

If you think you will need to take the more invasive test (and I would recommend it at this point if you still suspect and your GI doc is willing) then DO NOT GIVE UP GLUTEN BEFORE THE TEST. Do *not* do a food trial, because if you want the results to be accurate your daughter must be consuming gluten for at least a month.
 

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I don't see the point of a celiac diagnosis with a young child. There's no treatment, the end result is "stop eating gluten". Even if it's not celiac's there can still be gluten sensitivities that aren't diagnosable beyond "stop eating it and see how you feel". Personally, the invasive test just seems really unpleasant for kids to have to go through, and it may come back negative, your kid is still sensitive to gluten, so you'll end up with the same answer of "stop feeding your kid gluten" that you suspected before putting them through it.

Given how vital nutrition is in little kids, I'd also be hesitant to spend even a few days feeding them a food I suspect is damaging them- and it can take weeks or months to get tests scheduled and sorted out. If you've got an awesome doctor who can schedule it tomorrow, that'd be one thing, but leaving your child on a food you think is a problem for weeks or months just to be told "yeah, stop feeding it to them" makes no sense to me.

I know some parents/people will take it more seriously if you can say "it's celiac's", but if you just take a gluten sensitivity as seriously as celiac's then that's not an issue. I also know that some schools will take it more seriosuly, but if you prove through an elimination diet that your child is gluten sensitive and get the doctor to agree with it, then the schools should respect that. A food sensitivity is just as legitimate as something with a fancy name.
 

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There is also a less invasive genetic blood test if it's the more invasive test that wants to be avoided. I should have specified which blood test, perhaps OP has had the genetic one.

The "usual" test looks for gluten-specific antibodies in the blood. Even celiac positive people can have negative blood results for this test. Since celiac is genetic, the other test looks for genetic markers. If there are none, then you don't have it, won't have it, but it doesn't preclude sensitivities to gluten. Unlike a negative blood test for antigens (? I'm blanking out on the proper term), a negative genetic test is definitive. If you are positive for this test, it means that you could have active celiac.
 
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