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I'm looking for some resources - haven't been successful with the search, probably did it wrong - I turned 35 last month and became pregnant a few weeks later. This is our second child and before I go to the ob, I want to do some reading about all those tests they make you do when you're 35 and older and pregnant.<br><br>
Does anybody have any recommendations for books or websites?<br><br>
Thanks,<br>
Tanya
 

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Welcome! First, <b><i>they can't MAKE you do any tests</i></b>. At all. YOU are the paying customer! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
I'll be 40 when this one, my 4th, is born. I was 38 with my 3rd. You can betcher bumpkin no one "tested" me - they're very very inaccurate and wouldn't change anything for me anyways.<br><br>
You can do google searches for AFP, triple screen, quad screen, etc., to get the information - and the false "positive" stats.<br><br>
There is also an over 35 board here, I believe.<br><br>
Congratulations, and good luck!
 

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Tanya,<br>
I was 35 when I got pregnant with my first. Before I say anything else, let me stress that they don't MAKE you do any tests. You're in charge of your own health care decisions and if you don't want to take any tests, you don't have to.<br><br>
My husband and I chose for me to undergo a screening test. We did the First trimester screen, which is a blood test coupled with an ultrasound that measures the nuchal translucency (the amount of fluid behind the neck). If I knew then what I know now, I would not have taken the test. The older you are, the more likely it is that you will have a false positive, and then you will have to decide whether you want diagnostic testing (a CVS or amnio). We chose to have CVS when given 1:15 odds that our baby had Down Syndrome. This was a very stressful period in my pregnancy.<br><br>
A lot of women choose to not do testing because the results would not affect their decision to continue the pregnancy. Other women choose to test because they would want to prepare for a special needs child. Other women choose to test because they would not continue their pregnancy. Before deciding one way or the other, you need to figure out what you would do with the information you get.<br><br>
But remember, no one can make you take any of these tests--you can decline everything if that's what you want.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
I'm 42 and planning an unasissted homebirth with NO testing and NO interventions. All of those tests carry some risk and these are not risks I am willing to take. Any OB who tries to bully you is not one you want to hire.<br><br>
There is an active "Pregnant in our 30s" thread here and a lss active "over 40 and pregnant" thread.
 

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<a href="http://www.webmd.com/baby/Chorionic-Villus-Sampling-CVS" target="_blank">http://www.webmd.com/baby/Chorionic-Villus-Sampling-CVS</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Proudmomoftwins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9052040"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Rebecca, can I ask what a CVS test is? I am scheduled for nuchal transparency test next week and didn't realize how unreliable it could be.</div>
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Dena, as Mom2bja posted, CVS is chorionic villus sampling. They take a sample of the placenta, either through the abdomen or through the cervix. The placenta contains your baby's genetic material, and they can test it for chromosomal abnormalities. They can do a CVS at an earlier stage than an amnio, but it's associated with a higher rate of miscarriage. Some women say that it's painful, but I couldn't even feel mine (cervical CVS).<br><br>
The odds of screening positive grow substantially with age. In my age group (35-39), the odds that you will screen positive are 1 in 15. Over all age ranges, if you screen positive, the odds of having an affected pregnancy are 1 in 45. (These numbers are for the blood test + the NT scan--are you having both, or just the scan?) This paper really helped me understand the NT test, and what my results actually meant:<br><a href="http://www.wolfson.qmul.ac.uk/epm/screening/docs/combinfo.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.wolfson.qmul.ac.uk/epm/sc...s/combinfo.pdf</a><br><br>
Good luck! I hope your test goes well...
 

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Congratulations on your pregnancy!!! I am 42 and pregnant with my 4th baby. We are using a MW and chose not to do any testing. The results of the tests would have made no difference to us. As others have said, do not let anyone bully you into testing.<br>
Good luck!!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2">
 

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I was nearly 35 when I conceived my DS. I was about to turn 37 when I conceived the baby I am now carrying.<br><br>
The only test that I took (and it was my choice) was the ultrasound and blood test for the first trimester screening.<br><br>
Had my results had come back for a high chance of a baby with downs, I would have refused CVS or amnio as I didn't want to chance a miscarriage and aborting would not have been a choice for me.<br><br>
Some women choose not to have the first trimester screening at all because it wouldn't affect their decision one way or the other but I wanted it.<br><br>
I also had an anatomy ultrasound at 19 weeks. Again this is a personal choice to make as there are pros and cons about ultrasounds. For me the pros outway the cons. My DH's side of the family there is a family history of heart defects and I have a friend whose son had kidney problems which was picked up by ultrasound.<br><br>
Being 35 or older shouldn't automatically make it so that our baby's won't be born normal and healthy.
 

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The Sears' Pregnancy Book, Mothering Mag's Having a baby Naturally, Ina Mae Gaskin books, and of course Mothering magazine... When I found out I was pregnant everyone freaked out saying I am high risk because I am so old. So kind... I was told a midwife would never take me, wrong, I love my midwife, she doesn't think I am old!!! The only thing she asked me to do was have a dating US done 3 weeks ago because I have very wacky cycles and my size didn't match my cycle dates!!! I'm glad I did, there was a 3 week difference!!!
 

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I'm 37 (36 when I got pregnant) and am pretty sure 35 isn't considered old anymore. I did get the nuchal translucency test, and felt great about seeing the baby at 11.5 weeks on the ultrasound. I don't like the idea of recreational ultrasounds, but the usual screening tests are fine by me. I don't think they gave me any other recommendations on account of my age.
 

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I haven't read any books, but a few years ago an OB explained to me why they recommend an amnio (and now you have the choice of other things, like the CVS, etc.) over the age of 35. The risk of miscarriage due to an amnio is not dependent on age ... I don't know what the percentage is, so we'll call it A%. No matter how old you are, your risk is A%. If you think visually (like me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">), imagine a graph where the x-axis is age (getting older as you move to the right), and the y-axis is risk. There would be a straight, horizontal line on this graph representing the risk of m/c when you have an amnio -- always the same, regardless of age.<br><br>
Now, consider the risk of genetic defect. This IS dependent on age. The older you get, the higher the risk -- and the faster that risk goes up. So if you plot that line on the graph, it will look kind of like the right half of a capital "U". Low when your age is low, and going higher as you get older.<br><br>
If you look at the age of 35 on that graph, it's where these two lines cross. Below 35, the risk of m/c from the amnio is higher than the risk of genetic defect. From 35 and on, the risk of genetic defect is higher than the risk of m/c from the amnio. That is the only reason they recommend an amnio starting at 35. Or at least, that's how it was explained to me.<br><br>
I am 35, and just found out I'm pg. At this point, I think it is highly unlikely I will do any testing at all.
 

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my homebirth midwife did not have me do any additional testing, I will be 35 at the time of the birth. The radiologist that did my ultrasound told me wht he recommended, but that he wasnt my doctor, so he was just informing me of what others would be doing if they saw an OB.<br><br>
There is a slight percentage rise each year, starting from in your 20s, as far as risk of baby having a genetic issue. It is hardly any higher tahn when I was preg 2 yrs ago, and wont be much higher if I got preg 2 yrs from now.<br><br>
I think many women are under the impression that some magic switch gets thrown when you hit 35, and its just not true.<br><br>
I hope you are able to decline very many of the tests that you find to be not worthwhile. Do some reading and researching to see what YOU want done, if anything <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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My babies were born when I was 34, 37 and 41.<br>
With each pg I chose not to do any testing because I knew that it wouldn't change my desire to take each pregnancy to term.<br><br>
I did have a strong feeling by the last pg that I would know if something were wrong with her.<br><br>
I think that I would be grateful for the information if I were carrying a 'special needs' child, so that I could do my research. But I didn't wish to rely on technology to tell me if there was a problem. The simple fact is that at my age there would almost surely be an indication of a problem, since the results are 'age-weighted.'<br><br>
blessings, mama,
 
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