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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wasn't sure where to post this, hope this is the right forum!<br><br>
My ds who will be 5 at the beginning of Dec. is still having trouble learning to count. (I posted about this issue last spring when his teachers brought it up to me.) We worked on it some over the summer, and are now working on this daily with him. He can count to five, and then usually will say six, eleven, eight. I read an article online and it has me wondering if maybe he's dslyexic or something? However, he writes his letters very well. Any thoughts or suggestions for me? TIA!
 

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My son is the same age (5 at end of Dec) and can count accurately up to 15, but in my experience as a K teacher, it is not at all unusual to have student who are not counting at that age.<br>
And, while my ds is counting, he doesn't much draw figures yet, and he rarely writes letter or numbers. I'm not worried, it's a combination of interest and developing in one area before another. The same could be true for your son.<br>
HTH
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>the_dalai_mama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My son is the same age (5 at end of Dec) and can count accurately up to 15, but in my experience as a K teacher, it is not at all unusual to have student who are not counting at that age.<br>
And, while my ds is counting, he doesn't much draw figures yet, and he rarely writes letter or numbers. I'm not worried, it's a combination of interest and developing in one area before another. The same could be true for your son.<br>
HTH</div>
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Same here; only I am not a teacher. Well, we homeschool/unschool but our son learns organically in context of real life; I don't teach him in any formal manner. Our son can count forward and backwards to 15. Add and subtract one digit numbers. Knows all the letters. And draws the letters for his name and some others that he has attempted. Every child is different. We focus on his abilities, not his inabilities. His self-confidence in being able to learn is more important to me than for him to learn on some arbitrary schedule or for him to worry about how he is behind (or ahead) of others. His progress is at his own rate, and according to his own individualized method of processing information.<br><br>
External pressure just makes us lose focus on what we are interally focusing on mastering, imo.<br><br>
Oh, and letters and numbers are the only unidirectional item in our environment. Any other object remains the same object from any dimensional angle. Like a chair is a chair from any angle. But a "B" is only a "B" in one dimensional plane and in one direction. It is totally normal for children to visualize in multi dimensions. We found that just having the letters and numbers in our environment without sequence (in physical multidimensional form) provided opportunites for him to manipulate and recognize them in the same manner as everything else.<br><br>
Pat
 

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I agree with these mamas above; all kids have different rates of development in all areas. Walking, speaking, reading, weaning, counting.... Working with your child is great; keep it playful and try not to feel stressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hopeland</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Is that the only thing he seem to have trouble with?</div>
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Well, he also has trouble with some colors, remembering songs, and sharing his toys. He does well with gross motor stuff, can draw people and other objects, writes his name and other letters well, and can recognize some letters. I know every child develops differently, but I just wonder how I can help him with the things he is struggling with. He is supposed to be going to Kindergarten next fall. If he just needs more time, or if he may have a learning disability and how I can help him.
 

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I have a 5 yo in K right now, and he is one of the oldest. He will be 6 in Jan. Anyway, he still have trouble counting, does the same thing, seven, eleven, twelve, etc...and he still has trouble with green and red. He can recite the alphabet no problem, but he only recognizes 4 or 5 letters. He has a horrible time with letters and the sounds they make, and he isn't very good at drawing either. But he is an extremely bright boy, he could tell you anything you would want to know about bugs, what they do, what they eat, and he will sing songs to you verbatim. He just doesn't have much interest in anything else right now, but I am not worried at all. He has to have interest before he wil want to learn. I try to make fun games out of things, like letters, and sounds, and it is coming along, in fact he really has gained an interest in the past few weeks. I wouldn't worry, all kids are different. It is about learning styles, and finding the fun in learning. Sometimes it take a lot more effort than what was expected. Good luck! But remember, you are not alone, I am right there with you mama!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/luxlove.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="throb">
 

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A couple of other books that comforted me about individual learning rates were John Holt's "Learning All the Time" and "How Children Fail".<br><br>
Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I haven't read those books, I will check them out.<br><br>
I wanted to thank all of you, especially RunningMama as you have put my mind at ease that my ds is 'normal' and he just needs some more time. He is more intrested in running around and playing right now more than anything, and that's how it should be. I've never pushed him or anything, we just try and make things fun and I try and expose him to new things. I just sometimes feel bad like he 'should' know these things and I haven't done my job by teaching them to him, and making sure he knows them by now. Thanks again.
 

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"Typically" dyslexic children have a difficult time with writing as well if he can write his name I would think that it is not dyslexia...also dyslexic children tend to write letters, numbers backwards. Having trouble remembering is a sign but he is still quite young. You might try giving him concrete things to count...like apples, beans etc. Trouble getting along and sharing is perhaps a sign of maturity and boys are a bit later in developing in that manner. Does he have an early birthday or late?
 

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He sopunds like he is doing pretty darn well to me. My somewhat gifted dd is doing only slightly better (but we neglect her education in favor of funner stuff <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">)<br><br>
eleven -seven. i can see where the confusion is there. they sound almost the same. easy mistake.<br><br>
my oldest had similar problems. hers were rooted in sensory integrated disorder. it would be there one day and gone the next. She has grown into it and copes pretty well. she is very smart but slower than snot. when she can consentrate on her work she can do it with almost 100% accuracy. but she was almost 6 before she could count to 30 because she couldn't se the pattern. and we did work with her daily from the time she was 2 (unlike our six year old . . )
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">and he still has trouble with green and red.</td>
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Not sure but is that a vision thing. I remember always being tested at eye dr appts about being able to distinguish between the two?
 

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Another book you might enjoy is The Miseducation of Preschoolers.<br><br>
Your son sounds totally fine to me. And advanced in some things.
 

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There is a form of colorblindness where you get red and green confused.<br><br>
I work in Early Intervention - your son is just fine - no learning disability to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks again everyone for your reasurance and book recomendations!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>PikkuMyy</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">There is a form of colorblindness where you get red and green confused.<br><br>
I work in Early Intervention - your son is just fine - no learning disability to worry about.</div>
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Yes, my step-dad has that (color blindness) where he can't tell red and green. My ds confuses orange and yellow. I've been able to determine that he can see they are different but he just mixes them up.<br><br>
PikkuMyy - What about a 19mo. old who only has 4 words? Would you recommend him for EI/Speech? TIA!
 

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No on speech therapy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Our 2 year old only had about 10-20 (incomprehsible to others) words. And exploded with speech over the next 3-6 months, iirc. We used about 10 baby signs and that probably slowed his need for words too. But boy baby signs made life easier before his words were commonly used. Boys, especially those with older siblings often are delayed in articulation, from what I understand.<br><br>
Now our son talks in 6-10 word sentences, uses verb and adverb tenses correctly, conjugates irregular verbs regularly (occasionaly correctly), etc. And he can parrot multisyllable words after only hearing it one time. No worries. They all develop in their own time.<br><br>
Pat
 

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Ditto on the no to speech eval for your 19 mo old.<br>
Our ds had 4-5 words only until he was 2.5, when he began to speak over a weeks time. His receptive language skills were always good, so I used that as my indication that all was well.<br>
HTH
 
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