Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
he spends a long time just hanging out on the breast, but only drinks for what seems like a couple of mintues then seems to fall asleep.<br><br>
I dont know if his latch is correct...I have almost no coloration to my areola so saying his mouth should cover most of it doesnt really help me.<br><br>
He is gaining fine. He was 7lbs 10 oz at birth and at 1 month he was 9lbs 6oz.<br><br>
He was having problems with bright green poops, so I have been letting him hang out on one breast per feeding and that seems to be helping, but he really only eats for a very short period of time.<br><br>
Now he has started fussing at the breast in the evenings.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,520 Posts
Hmmm well it sounds like your sweet baby is getting too much foremilk (green poo is a tell tell sign) which can happen if you have lots of milk. You could pump off the foremilk and let him have the fattier hind milk, but honestly pumping can be a chore and if it's not causing him obvious pain, you might just wait it out a few more weeks and it might fix itself when your supply regulates itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
I am going to have respectfully disagree. That information that fore milk and hind milk hold different fat content has been dis proven by new evidence. It is now known that fat content varies through out a feeding and therefore, mothers shouldn't feel they need to pump off the fore milk to get to the hind milk.<br><br>
Green poop is a sign of over supply. Therefore, block feeding is the best method for helping to slow down your supply. You do not want to pump because that will only make more milk. If your breast become engorged, the best things is to stand in the shower with hot water streaming over them and let them drain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,520 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>goodygumdrops</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15361960"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am going to have respectfully disagree. That information that fore milk and hind milk hold different fat content has been dis proven by new evidence. It is now known that fat content varies through out a feeding and therefore, mothers shouldn't feel they need to pump off the fore milk to get to the hind milk.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'd love to read the new study re the foremilk. I know from my own experience, pumping for a few minutes before feeding produced almost clear milk (with almost no fat rising to the top when cooled), but pumping after a feeding produced creamy white milk, with a thick layer of fat when cooled. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Green poop is a sign of over supply.</td>
</tr></table></div>
You mean oversupply of foremilk, the carbohydrate (lactose) loaded foremilk? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br><br>
OP, just keep doing what you're already doing, feeding on one side per feeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Previously, LC's believed that there were differences in the levels of lactose and fat content varying between fore milk and hind milk. Now, current evidence has shown us that there are no nutritional differences between either. One comes before the other, that is the only difference. Therefore, previous notions of hind milk/fore milk are not accurate. The lactose content and fat vary throughout the feed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,242 Posts
I would try some breast compression - see <a href="http://www.drjacknewman.com" target="_blank">www.drjacknewman.com</a> and click on videos for a good example of breast compression, and also some block nursing - nursing 2 or 3 times on the same breast - you can pump or hand express off the other breast to comfort if needed.<br><br>
No matter what all the studies say it is well-known that when the baby is block nursed or that the mother pumps off some milk to begin with, this helps with the myriad of problems that arise with an oversupply, and it's the mothers choice to decide what she would like to do; give the possibilities but let her decide - IMO there is no 'one' solution to this problem we have to work out what works for us - the mothers, even if it isn't what the textbooks say.<br><br>
So, what we do know is the milk towards the end of the nursing session - in most cases - is the milk which helps combat the liquidy milk at the beginning which in oversupply causes the problems - it doesn't really matter what we call it.<br><br>
As for position you can do the classic route of the cradle hold, ear, shoulder and hip in a straight line, tummy to tummy and pulled in close, or something that I really like which is <a href="http://www.biologicalnurturing.com" target="_blank">www.biologicalnurturing.com</a> run by a London based IBCLC and LLL Leader Susan Colson - really great and knowledgable woman, it's easier for you to look at the site than for me to explain - but when I suggest this position to mothers with newborns or older babes it seems to work miracles - hope that this has helped some - keep us posted with how you are getting on - good luck.<br><br>
It's completely normal for babes to be fussy in the evening and do some cluster sessions which can be very tiring and difficult especially when you have other children to look after, maybe using a sling or wrap would help you in this situation - the wrap especially will keep baby in an upright position - much easier for digesting all that good bm and massage the tummy at the same time just in case there is tummy/gas pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
Yup, advice that the baby's mouth should cover most of the areola is outdated and unhelpful - areolas come in all sorts of sizes!<br><br>
It is not uncommon for babies to lose interest in staying at the breast past the initial let-down around 6 weeks - when mum's milk supply typically has regulated - for a couple of reasons. One of these reasons is if they haven't had to work hard to get milk earlier (e.g. because of oversupply - which it sounds as if you may have had).<br><br>
I second ewe+lamb's advice. Breast compressions can keep a baby actively feeding - interested in the breast - for longer. And "laid-back" nursing positions such as the ones described on the Biological Nurturing site she mentioned have been found fabulously helpful by many mums and babies in terms of ensuring a good latch and efficient milk transfer. There's a lovely sample video there, as well as a "how-to" section with photos.<br><br>
The very best of luck, and let us know how you get on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks mamas. I will check out the resources you gave me. Would it make sense to nurse him on one breast, not for a specific period of time, but rather until I get the feeling that it is 'empty'? My left breast produces what seems like a lot more milk than my right.<br><br>
Also, I will be returning to work in about 2 weeks (for 3 days a week) and will be pumping while I am away from him. Is that going to make this worse?<br><br>
I need to get a lactation consultant to check our latch. It's probably not great. I want so much to nurse him for a long time. I gave up with my first around 6 weeks and I regretted it so much. I really want it to work out (and be healthy for him) this time.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top