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<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">I'm foster mother to a 9mo boy who is unable to eat solids. If he were breastfed I wouldn't be concerned as I'd know he was getting the best possible source of nutrition, but because he's a ward of the state he is formula fed (nursed for comfort, but I'm not making milk). I am taking him to a mainstream pediatrician Monday (required) and want to be prepared for what I might hear there.</span></span></p>
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<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">He is gaining well and in fact is a big baby toward the top of the growth charts. His caseworker is concerned that he still gags on even really liquidy solids, so I am compelled to pursue this.</span></span></p>
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<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">At 6 months I tried some very soupy baby cereal. He ate a bit the first time, but very little since. He just gags on it — as if his newborn gag reflex is still firmly in place. I've tried every few weeks since. Most recently I pureed a banana and added lots of water, avoiding any fibrous pieces on the spoon at all. Same.</span></span></p>
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<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">He is delayed in his development overall, so I wonder if he's just not ready for solids just as he wasn't ready to crawl until this week. He doesn't really show all the solids readiness signs. He didn't sit up well on his own til maybe 7 months and he doesn't seem any more interested in my food than he'd be if I had a toy on my plate.</span></span></p>
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<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">I guess I just want to hear stories from others whose babies still had the gag reflex at 9 months so I can tell his caseworker it's not that unusual. Or if it does sound like a problem I'd feel more confident in pursuing it. He does have trouble with coordinating his muscles so I suppose it's possible there's truly a swallowing problem or something. With his delays one might consider him to be a baby with special needs. So should I be concerned or just continue to monitor his growth?</span></span></p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>IncompetentHousewife</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284399/9mo-still-gags-on-solids-should-i-worry-or-chill#post_16103311"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">I'm foster mother to a 9mo boy who is unable to eat solids. If he were breastfed I wouldn't be concerned as I'd know he was getting the best possible source of nutrition, but because he's a ward of the state he is formula fed (nursed for comfort, but I'm not making milk). I am taking him to a mainstream pediatrician Monday (required) and want to be prepared for what I might hear there.</span></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">He is gaining well and in fact is a big baby toward the top of the growth charts. His caseworker is concerned that he still gags on even really liquidy solids, so I am compelled to pursue this.</span></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">At 6 months I tried some very soupy baby cereal. He ate a bit the first time, but very little since. He just gags on it — as if his newborn gag reflex is still firmly in place. I've tried every few weeks since. Most recently I pureed a banana and added lots of water, avoiding any fibrous pieces on the spoon at all. Same.</span></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">He is delayed in his development overall, so I wonder if he's just not ready for solids just as he wasn't ready to crawl until this week. He doesn't really show all the solids readiness signs. He didn't sit up well on his own til maybe 7 months and he doesn't seem any more interested in my food than he'd be if I had a toy on my plate.</span></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:10pt;"><span style="font-family:tahoma, sans-serif;">I guess I just want to hear stories from others whose babies still had the gag reflex at 9 months so I can tell his caseworker it's not that unusual. Or if it does sound like a problem I'd feel more confident in pursuing it. He does have trouble with coordinating his muscles so I suppose it's possible there's truly a swallowing problem or something. With his delays one might consider him to be a baby with special needs. So should I be concerned or just continue to monitor his growth?</span></span></p>
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<p>It sounds like he has some other special needs so it doesn't seem so unusual that he's not accepting solids. That's not to say it's normal, but more to say it's be expected. I don't know that babies are supposed to have a tongue thrust reflex at 9 months. I'd say it warrents looking into. I mean, a baby can't be on a liquid diet forever, eventually he's going to need to start eating, so I'd look into it further.</p>
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<p>The only other thing I would suggest is trying some other feeding methods. Perhaps try BLW so he can pick up a chunk of banana (roll it in baby cereal if its hard for him to pick up) and mush it in his mouth. Maybe he just doesn't like purees. Then maybe try a mesh feeder. Try not doing the cereal at all and just doing the mushed banana. But if nothing at all is going in, I'd say that warrants being checked out.<br>
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<p>Also maybe try a food other than banana. I personally am allergic to bananas and I want to vomit when I even just smell them. I agree to try a little BLW or a mesh feeder, and give a different food a try, like maybe avocado.</p>
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<p>edit: Just wanted to add that your username cracks me up to no end! I tell everyone when they ask that I am a SAHM because I'm certainly no housewife. :wink</p>
 

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I have a teenager who was a gagger in his early life and boy do I wish I knew then what I know now. Since he has an appointment with the ped also see if you can get a referral to early intervention. They will come out and do an evaluation and he will either be able to access services or if he is still in the range of typical, they might give you some more ideas. My ds gagged on almost everything until he was about 2 and we just muddled through. Now at 14 although completely neuro-typical has some really strong food/texture aversions
 
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