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So, about a year ago we started to get the idea ds was a bit different- the intensity, the language, math skills, heightened interest in EVERYTHING, etc. Over the past year, we've been seeing much more and realizing that "Hey- not every 2 year old writes his name! Not every 2 year old talks about having "half" of a cup and knows his phone number and can sight read a bit and can give directions all over the city!". We smiled and said- he's bright. That's nice...<br><br>
We had a language assessment for a stutter and some of the other professionals in the room also knew things were different with him, but for reasons of the goal of their organization, didn't want to go too deep into it. But now we are seeing a speech pathologist for a stutter and she recognized immediately that ds has other things going on and said that off-hand, she would put his spoken language at 6 years and his receptive language higher than that. That is about 4 years beyond his chronological age for spoken and as many as 6 years beyond for receptive language. It hit me. This is no cutesy thing. This is not just "Oh, he's smart! Great!" These "little things" he's been doing are more than just fun stories to tell the grandparents. This has the potential to be a very real force in his life- not because we make it that way, but because we now must look at things from a very different point of view. I realized (with guilt) that I have said things I shouldn't have in front of him, not knowing that he was grasping so much of it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> . I realized that it must be hard for him to have a 6 or 7 year old world being squeezed through a toddler filter and trying to make sense of it. I also think the frustration and intensity of it all is coming out in a stutter and in potty issues (posted here in another thread), which makes me sad because he is frustrated and ultimately hurting himself.<br><br>
I don't know. My husband says "Be happy! It certainly could be worse!" But when she said she'd put his speech at a 6 year old and some areas more and to "look for gifted toddler resources", I actually felt sad and overwhelmed (which I then promptly felt guilty for, because I know there are lots of other people who would love to be in my shoes...). I just kind of felt that I was starting down a much longer and harder road than I had anticipated.<br><br>
We knew <i>something</i> was happening and that he was probably gifted, but hearing it confirmed and sharing tales of our day and ds's understandings with a professional who actually said "That's amazing" hit home. I was also kind of relieved- I wasn't just seeing things or "bragging" and this is an important piece of the puzzle and fits.<br><br>
So, anyone, when hearing for the first time from a professional 3rd party that their child was gifted, felt overhwhelmed? Not particularly jumping for joy at that moment? Any words of wisdom that it will all work out <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy"> ? A bit of encouragement <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> ?
 

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So did they recommend therapy for the stutter? If it helps I will mention I've known more than one gifted boy who struggled with the brain faster than the mouth thing as preschoolers. I think it is probably pretty common.<br><br>
My overall advice is the same I'd say to a parent of a child who was just diagnosed with a developmental delay: he's the same kid as he was the day before he got that evaluation. Take the parts of what you've heard that better help you understand what he needs and leave the rest. And, overall just appreciate the ways in which he is doing well.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Roar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7916149"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My overall advice is the same I'd say to a parent of a child who was just diagnosed with a developmental delay: he's the same kid as he was the day before he got that evaluation. Take the parts of what you've heard that better help you understand what he needs and leave the rest. And, overall just appreciate the ways in which he is doing well.</div>
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That's exactly what I was thinking. You know your child better than anyone giving a diagnosis, and that will be true for quite some time.<br><br>
If there's one thing I think parents of gifted children need to make sure they are doing it is finding areas where their children do NOT naturally excel, and helping them explore what it is like to work hard and practice in order to get better, and push through the frustration of things not coming easily. Whether it is art, sports, social stuff, math, whatever.
 

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I understand what you're getting at. It can be disorienting and a little scary, especially if you are planning to public-school. I'd say check out <a href="http://www.hoagiesgifted.com/" target="_blank">http://www.hoagiesgifted.com/</a> and do some reading, and just wade in slowly.
 

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Thinking about all the decisions that go into raising any child is intimidating. When you add any kind of special qualifier on it, something that may make it off the normal track, then it can be overwhelming -especially if you let yourself get caught up in the "if we make this decision, will this happen in 10 yrs" cycle. And what alot of people don't realize is that there are special challenges and concerns that come with raising gifted children. But that doesn't mean it can't be done, and that doesn't mean YOU can't do a great job at it! Take it a piece at a time, you'll do just fine, I promise!<br><br>
K.
 

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in november, when my 2.5 year old ds saw a gifted child pscyhologist for the first time, she told us he was goign to test in the high to profound gifted range. it felt so overwhelming and scary to me. i had just thought he was a little above the curve...when i was told that our school district really didn't have the resources to accomodate him, i cried. i just didn't realize how much i took for granted the life i thought my babe was going to lead. i could see him maybe as a valedictorian, but too gifted to even go to school...the psychologist recommended giving myself time to grieve--not because it was a horrible situation--but just not the life i expected. i worked on processing my feelings and 6 months later i feel a lot more ready to handle the crazy road we're on. i think the hardest part is just wanting to have a friend that can relate. my kid can literally read just about anything, figured out multiplication on his own a month or so ago...i'm not bragging i'm just saying it feels isolating sometimes, like this little boy is so many different ages at one time...i hope i didn't vent my own feelings too much, i just want to emphatically agree that it can very much feel overwhelming.
 
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