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I realize that I don't have to think about this for a good number of years yet as dd is only 10 months.<br><br>
Please don't think that I'm being nasty by asking these questions...I'm just honestly very curious.<br><br>
I had kicked around the idea of homeschooling my kids, but, I just can't help but wonder if they would get a good education from me. How do I know if I would be smart enough to give my kids the education they deserve? How do I know if I am teaching them everything they need to know, that I haven't left anything out? How do you (really meaning myself) know that you are good enough? (I know that sounds really mean, but please know that I ask it in the kindest of ways).<br><br>
How do you deal with a subject that you are not particularly strong in? For instance, in school, I was fairly strong in math, and even more so in science. I hated English, and History. How do you teach your kids something when you didn't really enjoy or just weren't that strong in?<br><br>
I did well in school, I graduated with honors and in college (even though all I have is an Associate's) I graduated with honors as well. I love reading and learning new things. I am not happy with the school system that dd would be going into, and if we are still living in this borough when the time comes, I really will consider homeschooling dd. I guess I probably wouldn't be very good at it b/c I don't have faith in myself. That's probably a big part of it.<br><br>
Like I said, I don't really have to think about this for a couple more years, but it doesn't help to start learning about it now.<br><br>
Thanks for reading and your replies.
 

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It's not to early to start thinking about homeschooling! Learning doesn't just suddenly start at age five or so!<br><br>
What makes me think I'm good enough, smart enough, qualified to teach my children? Well, what makes anyone think public school teachers are? I KNOW for a fact, that the majority of teachers in my local public schools are not who I want educating my children. I took three years of education classes at our local university, made straight A's, and was told by the head of the dept that the administrators of public schools don't hire A students to be teachers, that they are intimidated by them (so I changed my major). The required courses for education majors (at least here) are the easiest, most ridiculous classes you can imagine - AND many of the people taking them complain they are too hard!!!<br>
Anyway, there are loads of materials out there to help you plan curriculum (if that is your approach). You can also get from the state what is required for each grade level.<br>
You can do it!! Honestly, you can learn with your kids as you teach them. I am taking a stab in the dark here, but I'd daresay the reason you didn't do so well in certain subjects was probably because of the methods in which they were taught. At home, you personalize each and every lesson to fit your child's needs.
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I am not happy with the school system that dd would be going into, and if we are still living in this borough when the time comes, I really will consider homeschooling dd. I guess I probably wouldn't be very good at it b/c I don't have faith in myself. That's probably a big part of it.</td>
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Well, there's your answer! Who in the world is more qualified to teach your child(ren) than you?!?!! NOBODY!!!! You will do just fine, better than fine, you will do a terrific job!
 

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I am using the Well Trained Mind as a loose guide to what I should be doing (my son is almost 5 so at this point it really isn't very much) I love the idea of unschooling, but at the same time I like the idea of a bit of structure so I plan on doing both and seeing what my son prefers as his learning style. He has been reading since the summer and he just started learning to print letters, this was all initiated by him. I have no worries that he is at the same point or ahead of the public school system. We also have some workbooks to go through when he feels like it, he thinks it is fun.<br><br>
We had been planning on home schooling since ds was born and I had many of the same fears as you but as he has gotten older I have watched him learn and my confidence that I can do this has grown. Children seem to have a natural desire to learn and pick things up quite quickly when they are ready. Watching him learn is amazing.<br><br>
In school I was strong in English and History while my dh was strong in math and science so that is how we may eventually split up the teaching. However, you will be re-learning along with your child and since you will be learning your way rather then your teacher's way, you may enjoy the subject more. Plus going through a second time at your own speed may boost your interest in the subjects you previously didn't enjoy. that is what I am hoping for as i could really use a math refresher<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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I'd reccommend taking a look at some of John Holt's books like "teach your own" or "learning all the time" He's a former school teacher who became a homeschooling advocate, so he's seen both sides of the equation.<br><br>
Also don't worry about some nebulous future -- the decision to homeschool isn't a once in a life time one. If you can read and balance your check book you can teach a child through the early years of schooling. When they are ready for more advanced stuff -- you'll find a way -- hire a tutor for a particular topic, take a community college corse -- or learn it right along with your kids, or maybe you and they will decide at some point that school is the right decision, and that's ok too.<br><br>
good luck<br><br>
rebecca
 

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Your question is a really common one among people considering homeschooling, so don't feel bad for asking! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
The thing is, it's not YOU that's giving them the information, you are showing them how to get the information. For example, you may not be an expert on Egyptology, but you can take your kids to the library and check out books on the subject, you can visit museums, you can go on the Internet, and you can talk to people at your local university about maybe meeting with a grad student or someone who could tell you more about what an Egyptologist does. That sort of thing...<br><br>
And there are tons of different homeschooling curricula available to purchase. They have guide books for the parents to help you go through it.<br><br>
So you really don't need to be a "teacher" to be a homeschooling parent!
 

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stafl pretty much gave the answer I was going to give...I used to work at a university library in my pre-mom days. The Elementary Ed majors often needed to have their class assignments re-explained to them, needed someone to pretty much take them by the hand and lead them to the books wherein lay the answers, needed someone to open the book to the correct page, needed someone to point to the correct area on the page, needed someone to read the information off the page to them, and, yes, some of them *still* didn't get it. Scarey! I would be silently thinking, "You're not teaching my child -- no way!" Obviously there are clueless students in every major, but El Ed seemed to have an abnormal proportion. I assume the worst of the bunch didn't end up with teaching jobs, but one never knows.<br><br>
Which isn't to say that all teachers are incompetent. I have several friends who are elementary teachers, and they are wonderful, creative people. Some have quit to homeschool their own children, which is a twist worth pondering.<br><br>
English and History are my weakest subjects, too, so I make extra effort in these subjects. Also, I can see from experience how difficult it is to grasp some of the concepts in these areas. Overall, I think these might be the most rewarding subjects to teach.
 

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I could have written this post myself a few years ago when we were trying to decide whether DD would start Kindergarten. In the end it was my mom, a retired public school teacher, who convinced me to give it a try. She gave me an idea of what a typical school day entails, how much wasted time and how little actual learning.<br><br>
After watching how my DD has taught herself things I would never even have thought of I'm completely convinced that it doesn't take any special qualities to teach. She teaches herself, I'm just here to make sure she has the time to do it and the resources.<br><br>
The first book we read was "The Well-Trained Mind" and it gave us a good starting point and lots of reassurance. DH and I have just recently read "Teach Your Own" (by John Holt) and even though we've been homeschooling for a few years now I think it's done more than anything else to give us confidence in ourselves.<br><br>
It's great that you're starting to think about this now. It takes time to unlearn the things that were drilled into us as kids.<br><br>
Oh, and about history, I think I got the worst possible history education in public school and now I have the opportunity to remedy that by learning it alongside my DD. We are having a blast doing it, and I wouldn't trade this experience for anything!
 
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