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I'm scratching my head. I just read this article: <a href="http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081013/ap_on_he_me/med_vitamin_d_kids" target="_blank">http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081013/...vitamin_d_kids</a><br><br>
When we asked our pediatrician about vitamin D supplementation once before, when DS was still EBF, he just rolled his eyes and made it clear that he thought vitamin D supplementation was a crock of @&%@, but while I read this article I was all ready to ask him if there was any reason to change our stance based on this new research... but then I got to the last sentence of the article.<br><br>
How annoying! Why do reporters give us a story quoting all of this new research, in the process uncovering the fact that the experts involved in these new recommendations are very likely motivated by ties to the formula and vitamin supplementation makers, and then leave it at that??? Isn't that just crappy journalism?
 

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Personally I take a cod liver oil/butter oil combo every day and try to remember to give it to DS (once he started eating solids). Regardless of the current studies or MD recommendations, cod liver oil has been around a long time and I think it's a good preventative measure.
 

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I agree, interesting final sentence to the story, and then just leaving it at that.<br><br>
Pardon my naivete here, but do infants get vitamin D from the sun?
 

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Yes, but in this day of "OMG the sun gives you teh CANCER!" many people aren't getting adequate exposure. I don't know anyone that takes their baby out in the sun without sunscreen and a bonnet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does sunscreen use prevent vitamin D absorption from the sun though? I'm unclear on how much / what quality exposure is needed... but it sounds like it's a whole lot easier to get your vitamin D from sun exposure than it is to get it from dietary sources?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hrsmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12376551"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Pardon my naivete here, but do infants get vitamin D from the sun?</div>
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Depends where you live. In Canada (even in the south) no matter how much sun you get from Nov to May it isn't the right wavelength to make vit D.<br><br>
If mom has good vit D levels and passed good levels on during pregnancy, then baby should be OK with the amount in breastmilk... but it seems that many Candians are vit D deficient. I'd still rather see mom take a supplement than an exclusively breastfed baby.
 

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so if I make sure to get lots of vit D will my ebf babe get some?<br><br>
esp w/me off milk now I am scared to go into my 4 mo apt--not knowing what to say- we arent starting solids yet
 

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hey...at least they added the last line.<br><br>
it still seems irresponsible to leave it till the end...but at least it's in there. that's one of the first times i've even seen them admit that the people coducting the study MIGHT be biased.
 

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I read an article about this today, too-- on cnn.com. It was enough to send me back to kellymom to look up their recommendations again. (Of course, they still say 200 IU for an infant...that study just came out, so I assume they haven't had time to revise it yet).<br><br>
I asked our local "vitamin expert" at the health food store for his take on the issue (he's the one who steered me to taking New Chapter prenatals and is quite knowledgeable). Prior to that conversation, I was unaware that there are different types of vit D, and the type most easily used by our bodies (and closest to sunlight) is D3. Apparently D2 is common in supplements, so if you are going to supplement yourself or your baby, look for the D3. I opted to supplement myself with 2000 IU for the winter, since we don't get outside as much.<br><br>
The most effective way to get vitamin D is the sun...I live in the South, so we get more effective sunlight than you Canadians. There is evidence-based info on this on kellymom, even detailing minimum exposures for infants to receive the proper amount. For us, it's about 20 minutes a day with only the face exposed, or about 5 minutes if stripped down to the diaper.<br><br>
I have been mindful all summer of exposing DD enough for a good dose of D without actually getting a sunburn. HTH.
 

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I haven't used sunscreen yet on my babe (I am not a big fan on loading up on it anyhow and she is too little), and I make sure she gets some sun on our walks (I do cover her up too to make sure she doesn't get fried).<br><br>
It is so wrong that news stations are broadcasting this and not mentioning the research bias.<br><br>
Anyhow...yeah, vit D does not get transferred through breastmilk and I would be really hesitant about giving a supplement (especially fish based) to my babe. I think I will stick with mother-natures approach...getting a little sunlight on us.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>~patty</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12380456"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Anyhow...yeah, vit D does not get transferred through breastmilk.</div>
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Actually, it does! Breastmilk is amazing. There have been a couple of research studies that supplemented mothers of low vit D babies, and the babies' vit D levels increased. The moms had to be on a high dose, but the babies were low to start with.<br><br>
It makes sense if we think about northern cultures. The Inuit traditionally eat diets high in vit D (they don't get enough of the right sunshine living so far north) and it has only been recently (I'm guessing as the diet has gone away from traditional to more mainstream Canadian) that breastfed babies have developed ricketts. I'd love to see more research done on this rather than just having a blanket recommendation to supplement breastfed babies.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>PatioGardener</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12380598"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Actually, it does! Breastmilk is amazing. There have been a couple of research studies that supplemented mothers of low vit D babies, and the babies' vit D levels increased. The moms had to be on a high dose, but the babies were low to start with.</div>
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To add on to PatioGardener's thought--they increased the recommended amount for kids and teenagers because studies show so many are low. Adults are low too, and nursing moms low in D will have babies low in D and will make milk low in D.<br><br>
For moms, a good-quality cod liver oil is a nice supplement for A and D (not saying to avoid the sun or avoid foods that are good sources, but as an add-on esp depending on your location/circumstances).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>PatioGardener</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12380598"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Actually, it does! Breastmilk is amazing. There have been a couple of research studies that supplemented mothers of low vit D babies, and the babies' vit D levels increased. The moms had to be on a high dose, but the babies were low to start with.<br><br>
It makes sense if we think about northern cultures. The Inuit traditionally eat diets high in vit D (they don't get enough of the right sunshine living so far north) and it has only been recently (I'm guessing as the diet has gone away from traditional to more mainstream Canadian) that breastfed babies have developed ricketts. I'd love to see more research done on this rather than just having a blanket recommendation to supplement breastfed babies.</div>
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<br>
Any ideas or links to show how much a breastfeeding mother should be taking? I'm taking 2000 I.U., two times/day of D3 but I'm wondering if this is enough to pass along to baby?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Proud2BeAnAmerican</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12383130"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Any ideas or links to show how much a breastfeeding mother should be taking? I'm taking 2000 I.U., two times/day of D3 but I'm wondering if this is enough to pass along to baby?</div>
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I think all nursing mothers need to read this!!!<br><br><span style="font-size:medium;"><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Assessment of dietary vitamin D requirements during pregnancy and lactation1,2</span></b> Bruce W Hollis and Carol L Wagner</span><br><a href="http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/5/717" target="_blank">http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/5/717</a><br><br><span>I take 4000-6000iu a day of a combo Carlson D3 and high vitamin cod liver oil (in the summer I lay out in a bikini midday and I am in the sun a lot so I skip vitamin D in the summer) Your body will burn through your stores at the rate of 3,000-4,000iu a day in the winter. I read a study that showed women needed 6,000iu to pass along enough in breastmilk.<br><br></span>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Even for women in the southern United States, however, <b>"we've found that lactating women need about 6,000 IU a day to transfer enough vitamin D into their milk to supply adequate amounts to a nursing infant,"</b> says Bruce W. Hollis of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.</td>
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<span>From:Canadians Advocate Boosting Vitamin D in PregnancyBy Janet Raloff<br><br>
Another article--<br><a href="http://www.lewrockwell.com/******/miller25.html" target="_blank">http://www.lewrockwell.com/******/miller25.html</a><br><br><br><span style="font-size:medium;">Vitamin D is so important</span>. It is not a conspiracy!!! Some places your body can onlt synthesize Vitamin D form the sun a few months of the year and you need mostof your body exposed in the midday sun. Just getting some sun on your hands all year is not adequate. Research is finding vitamin D defiency associated with cancer and autoimmune diseases so it is important to take in enough.<br><br>
Jennifer</span>
 

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Thanks!<br><br><i><b>These same investigators repeated a similar study with 2000 IU (50 µg) vitamin D/d and found that the vitamin D status of the breastfeeding infants improved significantly (92). Our group recently performed similar studies, supplementing lactating women with 2000 or 4000 IU vitamin D/d for 3 mo (38). We found that high-dose maternal vitamin D supplementation not only improves the nutritional vitamin D status of breastfeeding infants but also elevates the maternal concentrations into the mid-normal range. Thus, a dual benefit is achieved from high-dose maternal supplementation</b></i><br><a href="http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/5/717#SEC18" target="_blank">http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/5/717#SEC18</a><br><br>
It also appears you don't want to over do it either so I'm glad to see what the recommendations look like.
 

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My ped does follow AAP for most things, but told us right off that he strongly disagrees with their reccomendation for vitamin D for all breastfed infants. He told me that he's seen studies where too much vitamin D caused problems. Though I read what they said was the max amount, I still wonder if that's for an adult and how much it's really been tested. We live in the southeast and are about as pale as they come, so I'm not concerned at all about vitamin D. I don't agree with vitamin D supplement being a blanket recommendation.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>KurumiSophia</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12384421"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So how do you find out if you're in a latitude that gets enough quality sunlight?</div>
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<b><i>In fact, it is impossible to get the requisite amount in cities north of 37 degrees latitude for as many as 6 months out of the year. That includes cities like Richmond, VA, St. Louis, MO, and Sacramento, CA, and all cities farther north.</i></b><br>
I'm finding this info cited in numerous places including <a href="http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/95982.php" target="_blank">http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/95982.php</a>
 
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