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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've looked at the spinning babies website, but I still have a really hard time telling what position my baby is in. I am only 24 weeks, so I'm sure it's harder now than it will be later, but even with my first two pg's I could never seem to tell. My second baby was frank breech at birth and no one knew (had me and the midwives fooled that he was head down and well engaged, and his birth was a bit traumatic because of the surprise presentation that no one was prepared for). So naturally I have heightened concern about making sure the baby is in a good position when the times comes for his birth.<br><br>
Last Tuesday I had an ultrasound and the baby was breech and posterior, and his legs were straight with his ankles crossed by his face.<br><br>
So...how do I know if high kicks mean he is head down, or if it means he is frank breech with his feet up by his head??<br><br>
When you feel hiccups, are they generally felt more strongly near the head?<br><br>
My placenta is posterior...so if I hear the heartbeat with a stethescope, I am most likely hearing the baby's actual heart and not the placenta, right? So if I hear it low, that should mean baby is head down, correct?? I should not be able to hear the heartbeat with a stethescope somewhere other than near the actual heart, right?<br><br>
Any other good tricks and tips?
 

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Well-informed people, please post! I, too, am curious about ways to tell what position the baby is in. I have a related question, too: during the times I am calm and resting and I DO NOT feel the baby move, is it likely that the baby is just sleeping or is there a chance that the baby is facing my back and when she/he moves her/his arms and legs, they're hitting against my (nerve-less?) organs rather than against my tummy? Do you feel the baby's movements against your organs when the baby is facing your back (is that called posterior?)? If so, at approximately how many weeks of pregnancy?
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:
 

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OK- all of this is based on experience alone.<br>
Hiccups are strongest at the head end, unless baby is transverse when I always felt them all over. IME, when this baby was breech I felt it hiccup a lot less. Danav, this baby was breech for a fortnight, and a frank breech for two days and during those two days I was getting almost NO movement low. Look for a change in movements rather than corresponding to someone else's ideas of what your baby should be doing. A posterior baby has it's back to your back, and so is kicking all out the front. An anterior presentation is when it's back is curved round and is kicking towards your spine, and the movements do feel qualitatively different to me, but it's hard to describe. Also, your bump may change shape according to how baby rotates in the pelvis.<br>
I hope some of this helps
 

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Hi I delivered posterior with dd, and the one thing that sticks out in my mind is that I could really feel her hands on the front of my tummy / pubic area & her kicks were all out front.!!! This time around my babe has been alternating between Rt & left side lying with his feet off to the opposite side. I can tell this because of his kicks and where the HUGE bump or/his back is. Occasionally he will center himself in the anterior position ( his back against my belly & feet kicking toward my back ) however I only really feel his back pressing outward when he is in this position rather then his kicks ( if that makes any sense (?) )<br><br>
This being my second time around I am much more aware of positionioning then the first time, just cause I have felt it before, but I think that I really was able to tell wich end was what at about 30 weeks & even then there is so much room in there that they can flip all around still <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/upsidedown.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="upsidedown"><br><br>
I hope that wasn't too confusing! Spinning babies site is great ! As a person that labored with back pain of a posterior babe i highly recommend doing the excercises to avoid it!!! I have been doing them religously from about 32 weeks every night! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Quite honestly, I found the belly mapping exercises on Spinning Baby to be utterly useless. I have had more luck palpating my belly--but you have to be pretty firm with it, just patting yourself a little bit won't work. You have to push against your uterus pretty strongly. You will be able to get a feel for which part is which.<br><br>
What someone said on my DD board is true--the <i>strongest</i> thumps are where the feet are. What was said on this thread is also true, I assume, because although I've never had a frank breech I've got a vertex baby for the first time ever, and the baby's head does move quite a bit. So if you've got good movement from something that feels big down below and at the same time strong thumps up top, that's going to be a pretty good sign your baby has moved to head down.<br><br>
But, trust intuition before anything. I was told repeatedly in my first pregnancy that my footling breech baby was head-down. Nevermind that I could feel her little feet stomping on my cervix, she was head down. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes"> This time around, I knew the baby is head down because, well, it feels totally different than before.
 

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I asked my dr. about this just last week, because I've *never* been able to figure out baby's position. When I asked if she could tell me for certain if the baby was posterior or not, she said to be completely accurate you'd need an ultrasound. However, she did say that since we can feel a hard mass right in the middle of the top of my belly she assumes that's his bottom so theoretically he's facing the right way. If he was posterior than that area would be soft.<br><br>
She did mention that you have to feel comfortable to let "your fingers do the walking" (palpation as another poster mentioned) and reminded me that that's what everyone had to do before ultrasound came along, anyway. She's been feeling him in head-down position since week 33 (I had pre-term labor) and has to be pretty firm about it. Dh was able to feel his head that way as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the advice ladies! I don't think the baby is posterior anymore, because the last few days I've frequently felt a very distinct "back" along the left side of my belly. I've been feeling kicks mainly in the lower half of my uterus, but also feeling a few hiccups there. So who knows!<br><br>
Sagesgirl - Noah had us ALL fooled, myself and the midwives! I found out he was breech at 35 weeks by ultrasound, and did all the tricks to get him to flip that weekend. By Monday, things felt VERY different - I didn't actually feel him flip over, but the immense pressure I had been having low in my pelvis was gone, and my belly just didn't feel quite the same, so I believed he was vertex. Midwives examined me and were fully convinced they could feel his head very well engaged (like 0 station) the following week. Boy, were we all stunned when his little bottom started "crowning"! So, I don't know if he just really had us all fooled and was breech the whole time, or somehow even after being engaged SO low he was able to flip again during labor.
 

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I feel the same as you - hiccups and kicks way down low. And even though I attended a workshop *in person* with the spinning babies MW, I still cant use the belly mapping to figure this out! There is no map on her site for what I feel! Go figure.<br><br>
I can only assume I have a head down babe (MWs guess this a well) with a solid back along either left or right side, nice firm butt up at the top and feet extended down towards his/her head. But all of the belly mapping stuff has the kicks opposite the head, with bent legs. I guess we have babies with flexible hamstring muscles! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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