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On another parenting board I'm on a mother was complaining because her 8-month-old's circ was adhesed AGAIN (gee, and I thought circs were SO much easier to take care of!). When it happened last time the doctor just pulled it back, but he said he wouldn't be able to keep doing it because he was getting bigger and starting to fight it (uh, yeah, I would too!). The mother was wondering what to do. I told her to just leave it alone, that the adhesions would dissolve on their own just like they do in intact boys, and that repeatedly forcefully retracting it can cause scar tissue. Am I correct? I'm assuming that this is only the second time it has happened, the adhesion wouldn't be so severe that it wouldn't dissolve on its own in time.
 

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`my advice to moms like that is to leave it alone. As they get older, if it still doesn't dissolve, they can use estrogen or steriod cream on it to dissolve the adhesions. I also council them to make SURE to leave their next child INTACT to avoid such pain and suffering.<br><br>
hth<br>
Misty
 

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The danger with adhesions is when it's the scar that's part of the adhesion. If it's on the scar, the adhesion can become permanent. So leave it alone if it's not adhering to the scar, but treat it if it is adhering to the scar.<br><br>
Yeah, right. Cut penises are so much easier to take care of than intact. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">
 

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J Urol. 2001 Mar;165(3):915.<br><br>
Penile adhesions after neonatal circumcision.<br><br>
Ponsky LE, Ross JH, Knipper N, Kay R.<br><br>
Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.<br><br>
“In these groups we noted an adhesion rate of 71%, 28%, 8% and 2%, respectively. The rate of adhesions more severe than grade 1 was 30%, 10% and 0% in boys 12 months old or younger, 13 to 60 and 61 months old or older, respectively. The oldest patient with grade 3 adhesions was 31 months old. Skin bridges in 6 cases involved the circumcision line in 4.”<br><br>
"CONCLUSIONS: Penile adhesions develop after circumcision and the incidence decreases with patient age. Although there is debate on whether to lyse these adhesions manually, our findings suggest that adhesions resolve without treatment. Based on our results we do not recommend lysing penile adhesions, except perhaps those involving the circumcision line."<br><br><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10893633&dopt=Abstract" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract</a><br><br>
“Penile adhesions occur frequently after circumcision. Some physicians advocate manual lysis of the adhesions. This procedure can be painful and traumatic. Penile adhesions are normal in uncircumcised boys and normally resolve without treatment.”<br><br><a href="http://www.kidsgrowth.com/resources/adviceDetail.cfm?id=3420" target="_blank">http://www.kidsgrowth.com/resources/...il.cfm?id=3420</a><br><br>
Gil Fuld, M.D., F.A.A.P.<br><br>
“Sometimes after a routine newborn circumcision, excess foreskin remains. Since newborn circumcision is not medically necessary, it's certainly better to leave a little extra than to take off too much and damage the child's penis.”<br><br>
“So, it's a common occurrence in little boys for adhesions to develop under any remaining foreskin, although it's rarely a problem and practically never requires a repeat circumcision.”<br><br><a href="http://www.medem.com/medlb/article_detaillb_for_printer.cfm?article_ID=ZZZYMEGW1NC&sub_cat=474" target="_blank">http://www.medem.com/medlb/article_d...NC&sub_cat=474</a><br><br>
Vincent Iannelli, M.D.<br><br>
“It isn't really normal, but is a common complication after a circumcision. In a situation like this, penile adhesions form when the skin on the shaft of the penis attaches itself to the glans or head of the penis. In extreme cases, it can look like the child was never even circumcised, leading parents to believe that the child had a 'bad circumcision.'”<br><br>
“If the skin is attached only on the very base of the glans, then your child has a very mild case of penile adhesions and you can likely just leave it alone. It should eventually separate, especially once your child becomes older, and anyway, forcing it apart would be painful.”<br><br><a href="http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weeklyquestion/a/05_pnl_adhesion.htm" target="_blank">http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weekl...l_adhesion.htm</a><br><br>
“The foreskin will almost always detach itself in time as a boy develops. It should not be forcibly retracted. This may lead to scarred adhesions that will not detach without surgery. Penile growth is not usually influenced by adhesion of the foreskin to the glans penis.”<br><br><a href="http://www.henryfordhealth.org/19160.cfm" target="_blank">http://www.henryfordhealth.org/19160.cfm</a>
 

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Ouch! Makes me sick just reading about adhesion. Ds had one very tight adhesion from his circ. When the Ped tore it back he screamed like mad. Poor baby. I never let the ped touch his penis again. We just left it alone. In time it resolved on its own.<br><br>
That's why my grandsons are intact. All three of them! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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