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<p>we have been home with our adopted daughter for a week now, and I've been the one putting her to bed at night and doing lots of skin time for bonding. Three nights ago she was almost asleep and turned and latched to my breast. I was leaned back in the chair almost asleep myself so it really took me by surprise. Now every night she asks for my breast and she will latch. She doesn't always suck but she falls asleep very quickly and contently.</p>
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<p>I mentioned it to my husband who said 'oh, well I'm sure she wouldn't mind nursing' and thats all he said. My older three kids all nursed well into toddlerhood, she is our second adopted child (our other adopted child was adopted at birth and was breastfed from birth by me, this adoption was international)</p>
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<p>Is this something I should encourage? I haven't breastfed in almost two years and have no milk. I wouldn't mind nursing her but I don't want to get a full milk supply in and have her stop! I'm feeling a bit confused.... to encourage her or tell her no? She seems to have an ok latch... I just don't know what to do.</p>
 

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<p>Wow!  I think that is so wonderful!  I would definitely go with it.  I don't see any reason why she'd get decide abruptly to stop, especially if she's the one who initiated it.  Having been a social worker in adoption and also planning adoption in our future, I would risk having a supply and no nursling if it meant a greater chance of successful bonding.  Out of curiousity, had she been nursed recently by someone else?</p>
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<p>Best of luck!</p>
 

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<p>what a wonderful way to get to bond with your new daughter! I honestly don't think it will matter too much to her whether you have milk or not, since nursing at 3 is mostly a comfort thing for most kids, but since you already have her, I would start offering at other times and just build your supply through her stimulation. that way you won't have a ton more than she wants, but you would know a lot more about how your body re-lactates than I do. </p>
 

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<p>I was able to easily relactate for our child adopted at birth. I did use a pump and an SNS with thawed frozen milk until my supply came in. It took about a month to get a full supply and a couple months until I didn't need the SNS for feedings in the afternoons.</p>
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<p>I offered at naptime and she accepted and fell asleep super fast. Like boob hit her mouth and she was out.</p>
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<p>I don't think she's ever been breastfed, she's been in an orphanage since birth.</p>
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<p>Thank you two for your responses. I've been thinking this over for a couple days and a friend encouraged me to post here. I used to be a member here but haven't posted for a couple years. I forgot my screenname even! And now have two more kids since then! I guess we will just go with it and see what happens. It can't hurt.</p>
 

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<p><span><img alt="love.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/love.gif">  How wonderful for your DD!  What a nice way to become 'attached' to her new Mama.</span> <span><img alt="love.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/love.gif"></span></p>
 

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<p>Wow. I dream of adopting and Bf-ing. That sounds like a special gift. At least it would be to me. If you follow her lead, you aren't likely to end up with oversupply. Blessings as you bond and love another child!</p>
 
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