Mothering Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello all. my DD speaks very well at 25 months (10+ word sentences, a vocabulary of probably 1,000 or so words.) however, she still can't make "f" "r" "s" "v" and "x" sounds (f and s come out as "h" sounds, r and v are "w" sounds). i've read that toddlers who can't say s yet will, in a word like "stop", say "top." my DD will say "hop." for an s at the end of a word, she'll use "t" (so, "cups" is "cupt").

the pediatrician wasn't worried at our 2 year visit, but i wonder if she was overly... not dismissive, because she wasn't... just overly impressed by how well she does speak that she didn't give enough weight to what she doesn't say. does anyone think that this could be an issue? if it is, would there be any benefit in perusing it, or should i just give her more time? fwiw, she does use a pacifier still, and i've wondered if it has affected her ability to form certain letter sounds.

thanks in advance for any input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
I think it is probably too early to worry since there are physical maturity issues that may explain her difficulties. However, I would keep a record of what sounds she has difficulty with and when she masters them. I've read somewhere, there is an expected order to sound acquisition, so if she skips some it might indicate an issue. A quick consult with a speech pathologist might reassure you and tell you at what age you should worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by majormajor View Post
hello all. my DD speaks very well at 25 months (10+ word sentences, a vocabulary of probably 1,000 or so words.) however, she still can't make "f" "r" "s" "v" and "x" sounds (f and s come out as "h" sounds, r and v are "w" sounds). i've read that toddlers who can't say s yet will, in a word like "stop", say "top." my DD will say "hop." for an s at the end of a word, she'll use "t" (so, "cups" is "cupt").

the pediatrician wasn't worried at our 2 year visit, but i wonder if she was overly... not dismissive, because she wasn't... just overly impressed by how well she does speak that she didn't give enough weight to what she doesn't say. does anyone think that this could be an issue? if it is, would there be any benefit in perusing it, or should i just give her more time? fwiw, she does use a pacifier still, and i've wondered if it has affected her ability to form certain letter sounds.

thanks in advance for any input!
Your dd sounds fine.

My oldest was diagnosed with severe phonological delay at 2 1/2... at that point her speech was completely unintelligble to anyone and I had to translate everything she said until earlier this year... now I just have to translate some...

THIS
http://members.tripod.com/Caroline_B...quisition.html

is a wonderful link to show how many pronunciation issues are PERFECTLY normal. In fact, most places will not even deal or diagnose a pronunciation issue before 3, unless it is obviously quite severe.

75% can do the /f/ at 3 1/2.
75% can do the /s/ at the age of 4 1/2.
75% can do the /r/ at the age of 5. (yes FIVE)
75% can do the /v/ at the age of 6.

It doesn't mention x, but considering that is a combination of the sounds /c/ and /s/... it might start to come in at the age of 3 when the /c/ comes in, but might not complete until a child is 4 1/2 when the /s/ comes in. (my speculation).

Anyway, as you can see... your pediatrician was not blowing you off. The sounds you are concerned with are ones that generally do not come in until MUCH later.

HTH.
Tammy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Hello. I'm an SLP. Your DD's sound errors sound normal for her age. Watch for changes over time--if her sounds don't develop (the Caroline Bowen chart posted by a previous poster is a good one), then seek an evaluation. Another good sign is that it sounds like your daughter uses the same substitutions consistently--a red flag is when they use all kinds of different substitutions and none of them consistently, which makes speech very hard to decipher.
Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,742 Posts
MIL works with children with various delays, and she's mentioned a couple of times that the speech pathologists there say they're less worried about pronunciation than the previous generation because studies have shown that it tends to correct itself over time with the majority of kids. They suggest always repeating the word back correctly.

I read recently that a stranger should be able to understand 70% of what a child says at age 3, which still seems like a low percentage, so it sounds as if your daughter's fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thank you all so much. i feel much better!

i'm also going to stop worrying about the pacifier now. she's still really comforted by it, and i really don't want to take it away until she's ready (though we do limit it to sleep times and when she needs the comfort).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,067 Posts
I actually called Early Intervention when BooBah was two years old because she had some similar pronunciation issues, and I was concerned that she couldn't hear properly. I felt very silly about it after they sent me some information on speech development in little children; Every single concern that I had was on their lists, but for 5 and 6 year old children.


The real trouble wasn't BooBah or her speech, but the fact that her older brother and the older cousin who spoke sounded like miniature adults at that age (at least, Chibi did within 24 hours of having tubes placed in her ears
). I had these really strange expectations about speech, and had no idea that saying "w" for "l" or "f" for "s" were entirely reasonable in two year olds. She was going to "fweep" and playing on the "fwings" at the park, and I thought there was something wrong with her ears because even if I repeated the words correctly for her, she would continue to mispronounce them.


She's three now, and her pronunciation still isn't perfect but there are fewer errors. She tends to enunciate difficult sounds very precisely ("This dog is veRy FLuffy"), and of course they're not there at all when she's tired ("I need my fwuffy pajamas"). For the most part, though, I'm unconcerned-- she's really doing well and I know that she is *capable* of pronouncing these sounds correctly, even if she doesn't do it all the time. In a few more years, her speech will probably be indistinguishable from Bean's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
I would say the benefit would be if they can help her move faster to where she can have the conversations she wants to have with the people she wants to have them with. If she's not frustrated, and can make herself understood, then I'd leave her.

I'm now wondering if a short course of help would help my nearly 4 yo daughter pronounce her name? It is more and more awkward for her to be asked her name -- it's a difficult name according to the development charts. So while I'm not worried, I wonder if training wouldn't be worth it for her just on her name.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,785 Posts
DD was carrying on long conversations at 2--that you couldn't understand! If you knew what her pattern of sound replacement was, it all made sense. Otherwise, gobbledygook. Since apparently most 2 year olds don't talk at all according to our ped, he didn't see it as a problem. As long as she had attempted to say "mommy" or any other one word, it was within normal ranges and thus not a problem. It was hard for me not to project DS's speech development onto her and see it as a problem, but now I see he was an outlier, and she's just on the lower end of normal WRT articulation.

DD is a few months shy of 3 now, and she seems to have figured out most of the sounds except for the "t" (as in the velar fronting example; thanks for the linguistic chart!). Sometimes she slips into it when she's tired. We didn't work with her that much on it. Every once in a while, when I could tell she was working on a new sound (like the L) I would demonstrate to her how it was made, and have her repeat, off and on over several days until she got it.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top