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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://commonground.ca/2016/05/pharmas-predatory-scare-tactics/

Last month, while giving a public lecture at the University of Victoria, I spotted a glossy poster entitled, “Reasons Why You Should Help Protect Yourself Against HPV.” It featured a man and two women staring provocatively into the camera. Since consumer-directed advertising of pharmaceuticals is illegal in Canada, I wondered what this drug ad was doing on a university bulletin board.
Universities have done this more than once. Isn't this sort of weird?
 

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I love Alan Cassels column. It's the main reason I pick up the Common Ground publication.
This is the first time I've read him, and I'm quite impressed. He has a point and he presents it effectively.
 

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Why are colleges advertising/selling pharma products to their students in Canada?

Could they be getting kickbacks of some sort?
 

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Yeah - couldn't be that they want to protect them from cancer..... That'd be too wierd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah - couldn't be that they want to protect them from cancer..... That'd be too wierd.
Law in Canada. No ads for pharmaceuticals.

They can offer the vaccine at the clinic. They can run an article in the student newspaper saying it is available and even that it will save money. Putting up posters produced by Merck = crossing the line.

Think about it.

Did you read the other examples?
 

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I get its against the law. I don't like pharmaceutical ads either. Just pointing out that the motivations of the university may have been good.

If you believe HPV vaccine protects against cancers (which is this opinion with actual scientific evidence) then you might like to encourage young people in your care to get vaccinated. That alone isn't pharmaceutical advertising.

Posting ads for a specific HPV vaccine made by a specific pharma company was not a good way to achieve the above goals.
 
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I get its against the law. I don't like pharmaceutical ads either. Just pointing out that the motivations of the university may have been good.

If you believe HPV vaccine protects against cancers (which is this opinion with actual scientific evidence) then you might like to encourage young people in your care to get vaccinated. That alone isn't pharmaceutical advertising.

Posting ads for a specific HPV vaccine made by a specific pharma company was not a good way to achieve the above goals.
We mostly agree. I just have some doubts about the actual scientific evidence. So far, no drop in cervical cancer rates. Lesions from types of HPV in the vaccine have dropped, but lesions from other types of HPV in the vaccinated have increased, according to one study. So I don't think this science is based on absolutely irrefutable evidence.

Thanks for clarifying! And I'm sorry I took your first comment the wrong way.
 

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My son goes to University in Canada. There are ads everywhere for safe sex, and about consent. There is a condom fairy. The attitudes towards sex are very liberal. My suspicion is that this is an extension of that, but that someone dropped the ball in using a pharmaceutical poster as opposed to an information poster, such as this one:
http://www.immunize.ca/uploads/hpv/hpv_2016_e.pdf

Alternately, they did not drop the ball, and it there is a kickback/COI of some sort involved.

I don't suppose we will ever know.
 

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You are allowed to advertise certain drugs in Canada, with pre-approval from Health Canada.

From: http://www.iclg.co.uk/practice-area...tising/pharmaceutical-advertising-2015/canada

There is a prohibition against advertising drugs on the Prescription Drug List to the general public as a treatment, preventative or cure for any of the diseases, disorders or abnormal physical states referred to in Schedule A of the FDA, which includes a broad list of conditions deemed sufficiently serious as to warrant this exclusion (including acute anxiety state, asthma, cancer, congestive heart failure, depression, diabetes and hypertension). There is also a prohibition against advertising the following drugs to the general public as a treatment or cure for any Schedule A condition (but unlike the case for Prescription Drug List drugs, preventative claims are allowed in each case by special exemption Regulations under the FDA):

• “Schedule D” drugs (i.e., “biologics” manufactured from animals or microorganisms which include vaccines/immunising agents, blood and blood components, and gene therapies);
From an article regarding advertising in Canada -

Although advertising of prescription medicines to the public is generally banned in Canada on public health grounds, shifts in administrative policy have allowed two types of ads since late 2000: "reminder" ads that mention a brand name, but make no health claims; and "help-seeking" ads that mention a condition, but do not state a brand or company name.
Health Canada Regulations - http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/pubs/medeff/_fs-if/2011-advert-publicite/index-eng.php
 

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