Mothering Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, some background. I had an emergency c-section with my son, now 20 months old, after an unsuccessful 48-hour induction at 36 weeks due to preeclampsia. I was on mag sulfate, antibiotics, painkillers, etc. And I hadn't eaten solid foods for four days. When he was born the nurses told me that he needed to flush all the drugs out of his system as soon as possible and insisted I give him formula. I was determined to breastfeed and didn't like this, but went with it reluctantly (my other choice, according to them was a tube down his throat to feed him that way!). After the c-section I didn't see him for three hours and then only for a few minutes. They insisted he spend the night in the nursery. The next day I was on delauded (sp?), and so out of it all I could do was sleep. I think I breastfed him some, but it was nowhere near every two hours. Two weeks later, despite almost exclusive breastfeeding (I admit in my inexperience I gave him a few bottles in the middle of the night because I was worried he wasn't getting enough and he was fussy) my ped told me breastfeeding wasn't working and it was time to supplement! He hadn't gained his birthweight back. I have since changed to a breastfeeding supportive pediatrician. Long story short, after two months and using the SNS we FINALLY were exclusively breastfeeding and he is now naturally weaning at 20 months!<br><br>
OK, so now I am pregnant again and due in January. I will be having another c-section because my doctor insists and I really like and trust her otherwise. Soooo... what can I do to ensure that I have a better breastfeeding start this time? I do plan to ask my doctor about having the baby with me as soon as possible (barring any complications) and about using a painkiller that won't make me so sleepy. But what advice do you ladies have for making sure that I don't go through this again. I WILL breastfeed this baby and I hope it is easier this time around because I'm experienced. But I'm most concerned about those first few weeks because that's where I think things went wrong last time. And with a toddler now, pumping and the SNS thing would be SO much harder (and it was hard the first time). Thanks, and sorry this is so long!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
You need to look at the inherent risks of a surgical birth to the nursing relationship and decide how lucky/fated you feel with regard to those risks.<br><br>
The surgery and drugs themselves set up enormous risk of compromised nursing relationship. I'm not talking about sleepiness for the mother now, I'm talking about the host of risks for the newborn and his/her ability to get their bearings after such an violent procedure. It is tough for a newborn, often, to have their sucking ability fully developed when they are removed from the womb prior to when they would emerge without surgery. By definition, they are coming out early and any doctor who assures you that they are 'right on time' with their 'due date' cannot prove that statement whatsoever.<br><br>
It's tough to suck enough to stimulate milk production when one is stoned. Again, I'm talking the newborn here. Further, it's tough to suck when you needed a few more days to practice. And it's tough to suck when you didn't get the chance to have the fluids squeezed out of your lungs while emerging through the birth canal. There are reasons why kids born via surgery have at least a 30% increased risk of respiratory disorders. Kids aren't meant to come out of the womb via surgery.<br><br>
If you feel lucky, then go for it. But if you feel the risks inherent to a surgical birth might be greater than your luck, you might want to find a better doc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,770 Posts
Wow, I am so amazed that you were able to breastfeed your first baby, with all the odds stacked against you! You rock! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banana.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banana"><br><br>
You might also post in the VBAC/I'm Pregnant forum, as lots of mamas have had c-births. I have not had a c-birth myself, but as general advice I would say:<br><br>
1) Don't schedule a c-birth, but go into labor naturally and then get the section if that's the way you decide to go. That way you know baby is ready.<br><br>
2) No separation of baby from you. DH to be in charge of holding baby near you as they sew you up and in recovery. BF as soon as possible, and room in with baby right by you at all times.<br><br>
3) Get help for the post-partum period: a lactation consultant experienced in getting c-birth babies to the breast; family and friends to take care of your ds and all the housework and cooking so that you can focus on nursing.<br><br>
I would also ask your doctor if she will delay cord clamping/cutting, possibly by taking out the placenta and hanging it like an IV so baby gets all the cord blood he needs. Just to give him the best start possible.<br><br>
Good luck, mama!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,308 Posts
The best way to 'flush' out your babe's system is with his or her mama's milk! Any Doctor or Nurse worth his or her salt won't tell you otherwise!<br><br>
IT's often really helpful to have the support of a Doula, even with a C-sec birth. They can be your champion and can spout your birth plan if you or dh are too wiped or wore down to fight back!<br><br>
Congrat's to you on sticking it out and BF'ing your first babe! Lot's of mama's throw in the towel at the least little difficulty and would NEVER endure everything you went thru to persevere. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
Good luck Mama!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,388 Posts
Both of my babies were c-sections and both were successfully breastfed, so I feel a little competent to answer.<br><br>
First, you might want to investigate why a VBAC isn't being recommended for you as it is true that after a c-section its harder. But its not impossible and if a c-section is required, then you can make it work!!!<br><br>
I was lucky that I was in a BF supportive women's hospital. The baby stayed with me in recovery until I was awake enough to BF before they took her to be bathed. It was a 100% rooming in hospital, so after we can back together after her bath and my transport to my room, she never left me again. These definitely both helped. Even here though, I made SURE that all the nurses (pre-op, post-op, recovery, floor nurses) knew that BF was really important to me and nothing was to take precidence over it.<br><br>
I think the other thing that helped with both babies was a lactation consultant. Again, my hospital had them visit new moms as a matter of course, and you could have one paged each and every time you nursed until you felt comfortable with it. What a great thing. If you don't have such support, find one on your own and work with her, maybe even before the birth.<br><br>
I took all my hospital days, despite the fact that I wanted to go home to my little guy. I think this was good for us because we really were stable before I added a preschooler to the mix.<br><br>
Finally, and maybe most importantly, after the surgery I never took any drug stronger than Motrin. A couple of times I would have loved a stronger pain medication, but I wanted to be as clear headed as possible and I didn't want the baby to be getting anything that could make her sleepier. It is possible to get through this on super-strength Motrin only and well worth the pain. That, I think, is the advantage of scheduling that c-section ahead, because you can control the medications they use and make sure you have your own pain management system in place. All that breathing they teach in baby-prep class? Works just as well when you are trying to get up to get to the bathroom!<br><br>
Good luck and stick to your guns!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,388 Posts
it may have been the mag sulfate that screwed you over. there is another mama here, Lisa_Lynn, who just had her baby and hasn't been able to give him breastmilk yet. she was induced and given mag sulfate as well, and it seems as though that stuff is lethal to nursing.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top