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<p>Hi all,</p>
<p>Here's the situation: I'm having my second homebirth soon, sometime in January, and hoping to have some kind of plan or way to prevent the absolute heck that I go through with waiting days for even colostrum to come in, while my newborn nurses constantly but grows increasingly frustrated and hungry, finally screaming all the time and switching breasts... it is unbearable.</p>
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<p>With my first, a 38 week induction-turned-cesarean, I figured (reasonably) that the hypothyroid I had to fight to get diagnosed and treated, along with the major abdominal surgery, were the sole reasons why no matter what I did, I couldn't keep her from going hungry... that resolved with thyroid pills, SNS and hospital pumping, and Domperidone, and she weaned at 2 1/2.</p>
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<p>With my son, the HBAC, I was never separated from him, was a seasoned breastfeeding mama, had my thyroid dosage where it needed to be, hadn't had another surgery, totally natural labor and birth, AND consumed my placenta (which REALLY helped me physically and psychologically!)...and the first week still ended up unmitigated hell, with a baby increasingly hungry and miserable, and no one, not even my homebirth midwife, taking seriously my report that there REALLY wasn't even colostrum, 3 days into it! I finally broke down at that point and gave him boiled sugar water, thinking better that than formula (both my kids so far were pretty much born allergic to dairy and soy), and it made an immediate difference, and got us both through with survival, til finally I did produce.</p>
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<p>But that experience, and the most aggravating experience of being not taken seriously AGAIN, and dismissed AGAIN as just being overly worried and imagining things (grrrr!) has made me feel pretty desperate for answers this time, for some plan of action, for someone who knows what I can take or eat or drink or do, to improve the hormone issues associated with PCOS and elevated androgens, that may be at the root of this.</p>
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<p>I don't think insufficient glandular tissue is the problem because once I finally do get going, whereas I never have "abundant" or "too much" milk, I seem to have enough, and my 10 lb son grew really well thereafter, so long as my thyroid levels were monitored and kept up with.</p>
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<p>But I live in a "medically underserved" area, and am sick to death of trying to get help from local docs and everyone who is supposed to know, and hearing over and over the same stupid placations about how "It's all just supply and demand!" and that I must either not be doing it right, or else I am just a typical nervous mother who doesn't get breastfeeding and is seeing problems that aren't there.</p>
<p>Or else just a flat recommendation to formula with quizzical looks at why I value breastfeeding so highly if I am obviously having trouble.</p>
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<p>So, PCOS and getting colostrum and milk to come in, in a reasonable enough time to hopefully avoid a screaming, miserable, starving first week this time? It really is impossible to enjoy nesting in and feel wonderful things when your baby is not getting what she or he needs, and your body isn't just magically doing what it's supposed to do, and looking down the barrel of a first week like that again makes me want to run and hide, and cry.</p>
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<p>Any insights and advice on PCOS, elevated androgens or whatnot, and getting milk to come in sooner, are much needed.</p>
 

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<p>First of all, hugs.  That sound incredibly frustrating.</p>
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<p>For the advice about pcos, I would find a lactation consultant now and talk to her, even if you have to travel farther or talk on the phone.  I know a good one in NC if that would help.</p>
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<p>Are you taking alfalfa?  My homebirth midwife suggested it for increased hemoglobin during pregnancy, but I found out later that it also increases milk supply.</p>
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<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;">I would also find a list of all the galactagogues and start eating all of those that you know are safe for pregnancy (like oatmeal), drinking lots of water, and generally taking care of yourself.</p>
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<p>For getting supply up quickly, you probably already know the benefits of skin-to-skin contact, co-sleeping, and nursing all the time.  I used the technique described at the following website, too.</p>
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<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;"><a href="http://www.biologicalnurturing.com/pages/recipe.html%C2%A0" target="_blank">http://www.biologicalnurturing.com/pages/recipe.html </a></p>
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<p>If I were you, I would spend the first 3 days in bed with my shirt off and my newborn on my chest.  I also know that is easier said than done when you have older kids...</p>
 

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<p><span><img alt="hug2.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/hug2.gif"></span></p>
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<p><span>Some random thoughts...</span></p>
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<p><span>have you thought about metformin?  I have heard it helps some moms with PCOS to make more milk - not sure about bringing in milk faster though.</span></p>
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<p><span>Do you have a friend who would donate some milk?  If it</span> gets really awful during the wait for your milk (if it is a week like before) then you could give small amounts by sns instead of sugar water and it may help baby to stay calm and keep nursing.</p>
 

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<p>If you  have the opportunity the leading book on increasing supply due to hormonal or other issues is Diane West's Making More Milk that came out in 2009 or 2010. She specifically addresses PCOS and galactogues to target it. If you have a bookstore and an hour to read, it may be worth the time!</p>
 
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