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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're going to visit DH's parents over Thanksgiving. They live in CO, we're in IL. I was reading in "What to Expect..." about traveling. They said traveling in the 2nd tri was fine, just "avoid high altitudes." Wonderful.

So... anyone have experience with this? How common is it? How are the symptoms different from just getting sick? Any precautions I can take? What can it do to me/Bun? Am I worrying over nothing?

DH already told his parents that if I start getting sick, we will be leaving early. I've never really had any problems adjusting to altitude, but I'm a constant worrier.
 

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I think that it will mostly depend on the altitude where you are visiting. . . . But I wouldn't think that it would be that much of a problem. Drinking a ton of water will definitely help to keep anything at bay as you will dehydrate faster, and not over-extending yourself. Then again, who moves after eating thanksgiving dinner?
 

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That's why I dont read that book...it just makes you totally paranoid


Seriously -- I have climbed up to about 17,500 ft. and have seen altitude sickness firsthand. If you are a worrier, the best thing you can do is just educate yourself on the symptoms of altitude sickness -- so go on a climbing/hiking website and do your homework.

Drink lots of water and do preventative maintenance (black cherry juice, prunes) for constipation -- dehydration and constipation are probably the two things you most need to worry about at high altitude. You wont think you are that thirsty but you really really just need to drink a lot more water when at higher alt.
 

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Yeah, my DS and I lived in the Andes (about 12000-13000 ft) for 10 months and the effect on us was the desire to sleep sleep sleep. 7 p.m. felt like 11p.m. for months. But don't you already want to sleep?
 

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Not from your DDC but have lots of experience in this realm, so maybe I can help...

You may notice a few minor symptoms of altitude change... like shortness of breath, a little trouble sleeping the first few nights, heachache, etc. But you really don't have anything major to worry about, even pregnant. My husband and I work in the Andes and I spent the first 3 months of my pregnancy above 15,000ft. I didn't feel too glorious but there was no real harm to me or the baby. The elevations in Colorado should be safe for you and your baby.

The best thing you can do for yourself is stay really hydrated (if you think you are already hydrated, drink even more) and take it easy for the first few days. And of course don't forget to enjoy the scenery! Happy early Turkey Day!
 

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I went to the mountains outside of Denver when I was pregnant with dd. Make sure you drink LOTS of water and be sure to rest when ever you can because you'll be sleepy.
 

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I grew up in Colorado, half way up Pikes Peak so about 7,500 ft. As the other pp's said dehydration is the biggest concern. When I go home to visit I try to double if not triple my water intake. As the gym at my college in Colorado Springs says, "Breathe Deep".
Enjoy, I miss CO!!!
 

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Honestly, my advice would be to throw out "What to Expect...."

You know I am not in favor of banning books, but I wouldn't mind at all seeing that one gone from the shelves....
:
 

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Quote:
Honestly, my advice would be to throw out "What to Expect...."
I agree 100%. With my first pregnancy, that book freaked me out and caused me so much anxiety over every single little ache and sensation that I had to stop reading it. In hindsight, I should have just thrown it out!
 

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Originally Posted by mbro View Post
I agree 100%. With my first pregnancy, that book freaked me out and caused me so much anxiety over every single little ache and sensation that I had to stop reading it. In hindsight, I should have just thrown it out!
I don't read it a whole lot. It seems really ambiguous about a lot of things. I've already talked to my doctor (way back in 1st tri) and he didn't seem concerned, though he never seems concerned about anything, which concerns me a little
)
All the pregnancy magazines I've been getting talk about traveling like your biggest concern is blood clots and not being near your regular doctor/mw/etc if something should happen. None of them even mention altitude, but I figured there had to be a reason it was in WTE.
I told Paul we're going to have to stop at just about every rest stop we see because 1 - I'm going to have to pee, 2 - I'm going to be super uncomfortable because I can't sit for more than an hour without my ribs hurting, and 3 - the blood clot thing.
I am so excited for this trip. I love his family and I love Colorado. Last year I felt great the whole time, I hope this year is the same. (Plus I'm looking forward to getting some more Izze sparkling juice because I can't get it around here.)
Thanks for your encouragement, it helps a lot.
 
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